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danitiwa
07-09-07, 14:20
I'm currently using this tutorial that Ashnar told me about,
http://mree.deviantart.com/art/Coloring-Hair-in-Photoshop-29613234

Pay less attention to the face, I want to know how I did on the hair... I know it's pretty crappy, but it's a start! :p

http://i7.************/4mtwy0m.jpg

star girl
07-09-07, 14:24
nice for a start :tmb:

If you would tie up her hair back and then let loose some strands here and there then it'll look AWESOME! ;)

danitiwa
07-09-07, 14:51
nice for a start :tmb:

If you would tie up her hair back and then let loose some strands here and there then it'll look AWESOME! ;)

What annoys me is that it looks like yarn. >.< Maybe I should draw straighter lines?

Dakaruch
07-09-07, 14:54
What annoys me is that it looks like yarn. >.< Maybe I should draw straighter lines?

yes i think you should!
that would make her hair a lot better and more real;)
great first try, i know that mine would be a lot worse XD

Marija_Croft
07-09-07, 15:05
Looks great Dani! :tmb:

Apofiss
07-09-07, 15:49
It's good to begin with rough/blured strands as for different tones, imo it's the easiest way.

Quasimodo
07-09-07, 16:08
What I did with my Lara makeover entries was first sketch out the hair using a brush that looks like a big cluster of tiny dots, but looks like a lock of hair when you drag it to make a line.

Use a fairly dark color but not as dark as the shadows you'll be adding next. Use a smaller version of the same brush to suggest some shadows(with the darkest color you want to use),

then decrease your brush opacity to around 60%, choose a highlight color and start layering it on where you think light would fall on the hair With a really tiny bright brush you can add in stray strands and frizzies, etc.

Next, you can use the blur tool to smooth out the transitions from light to shadow. Now, a trick to make it all look magically more realistic is to use the filter called "Paint Daubs" - play around with the brush size and sharpness until you like what you see in the preview window. Ta-da! Gorgeous photoshop hair :)

Your art is improving a lot already :tmb:

danitiwa
07-09-07, 16:18
What I did with my Lara makeover entries was first sketch out the hair using a brush that looks like a big cluster of tiny dots, but looks like a lock of hair when you drag it to make a line.

Use a fairly dark color but not as dark as the shadows you'll be adding next. Use a smaller version of the same brush to suggest some shadows(with the darkest color you want to use),

then decrease your brush opacity to around 60%, choose a highlight color and start layering it on where you think light would fall on the hair With a really tiny bright brush you can add in stray strands and frizzies, etc.

Next, you can use the blur tool to smooth out the transitions from light to shadow. Now, a trick to make it all look magically more realistic is to use the filter called "Paint Daubs" - play around with the brush size and sharpness until you like what you see in the preview window. Ta-da! Gorgeous photoshop hair :)

Your art is improving a lot already :tmb:

Thanks Quasi! :hug:

Little-Lara
07-09-07, 23:06
Its very good, Dani. U're off to a great start. Next u can try doing the shading and smoothing out the highlights. PS. its always a good idea to experiment with brushes. :tmb:

Rynn
08-09-07, 07:42
Also one advice I can give you is that it is always useful to start of with a digital painting atleast twice the size you want the final result to be. This way you got a lot more area to work with and add detail. I usualy put a sharpen filter on my work before I resize it so that I get a nice smooth look. But that is just something you got to play around with, and see what gives you nice results. If you can, start off even bigger. The bigger your canvas, the more detail you can add, and the better your final result will be.
Also, practise, practise, practise. If you see stunning artwork with hair that looks so real that you want to run your hand through it, then concider all of the practise that went into getting that good. Also look around you, observe peoples hair, how does it float in the wind, how does it move, etc. Knowing the subject you are about to paint, analising it, is the first step in creating beautiful artwork. :)

Some more tutorials:
http://www.creativedust.com/tutorials.htm
http://www.tascha.ch/?page_id=86
Also check the other tutorials on this artists website, they are all very usefull -> http://www.tascha.ch/?page_id=21
http://div.dyndns.org/EK/tutorial/updo/
http://forums.cgsociety.org/showthread.php?threadid=259468

I hope this can help you out a bit. I'll see if I can make some renders with hairless poser people for you to practise hair painting on.

Editing to add another tutorial I found. I'm checking the websites of my favourite digital artists. *gasp* what a wealth of tutorials they provide!
http://www.henningludvigsen.com/wordpress/?page_id=24
This next tutorial is not for digital art, it's for pencil art but perhaps you can find some useful info in it: http://www.rebekahlynn.com/free/tutorial/hair_tutorial.html She also posted two sketches that you can use to practise hair painting on.

danitiwa
08-09-07, 09:59
Thanks Rynn! That first one looks really helpfull. :tmb:

Rynn
08-09-07, 10:49
I set up the render for hair painting practise, but I'll have to let it render over night I think, it'll take several hours to render. I'll give you the link tomorrow. :)

danitiwa
08-09-07, 10:53
I set up the render for hair painting practise, but I'll have to let it render over night I think, it'll take several hours to render. I'll give you the link tomorrow. :)

You made that?!? WOW You ARE GOOD! :yik:

Rynn
08-09-07, 10:59
Errrr, I think I'm getting credit here for something I shouldn't get credit for. :eek: I have nothing to do with the tutorials I posted here, they are all made by people I admire. :)

Some more explanation about the render I wrote about. I just used poser and vue esprit to make a scene, which I'll render large enough so it can be used by anyone who wants to practise hair painting. This way, you don't have to worry about painting a face etc. You can only focus on the painting of hair. The person in the first link I posted uses renders too, and then she paints on hair and clothing and corrects any faults the render might have had. I hope that explains it a bit. :D

danitiwa
08-09-07, 11:00
Aah ok. ;)

Rynn
08-09-07, 11:05
http://www.silentinspiration.com/gallery/afterescape.jpg
This is something I did, lol. Not that great at all! But you can see here, everything is done in 3D, only the hair is painted on by me. *gasp* I did this 4 years ago! :eek:

george_croft
08-09-07, 21:46
That's very nice Dani! :)