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Dingaling
07-09-07, 18:57
Would it make any difference if a person was to do 6 ten minutes worth of excercise vs. one hour (all at once) worth of excerise? Would a person get more out of the one hour or more out of the 6 ten minutes? Would 2 half hours be better? 4 fifteen minute blocks?

Ta :).

star girl
07-09-07, 18:59
It would be better IMHO if you'd do it in one hour straight... It doesn't break the flow :wve:

SamReeves
07-09-07, 19:09
A walk a day keeps the doctor away. :)

Assassino
07-09-07, 19:27
Go swimming!
30mins of swimming is the equivalent of 45mins of exercise on land because of the drag of the water:)

Dingaling
07-09-07, 19:31
I can't swim unfortunately and I'm too body conscious to do it. Y'know, having a big belly and all :p. So I'd have to be slimmer before even contemplating learning to swim in the first place :/.

It would be better IMHO if you'd do it in one hour straight... It doesn't break the flow

I hope I don't sound rude saying this but is this only just your thought or do you have some inside knowledge I don't know about? :mis:

A walk a day keeps the doctor away. :)

I already walk every day and excercise on a bike so it's not as if I'm sitting on my bum all day. I was just wondering if it was more effective to do it in "blocks" or all at once. Sometimes my legs are really sore after so many minutes and I'd like to stop but the thought of 'if I stop now it means it won't be effective' comes to mind.

Delakandak
07-09-07, 19:33
A break would do fine, lets say a break after thirty minutes.

danitiwa
07-09-07, 19:34
Jog, you can listen to music. And once you get good it's very relaxing. Plus it's a great feeling when you improve at it. ;)

A break would do fine, lets say a break after thirty minutes.
Hmm perhaps to get a drink, but I wouldn't stop just then that's when you're only warmed up. :wve:

star girl
07-09-07, 19:37
I hope I don't sound rude saying this but is this only just your thought or do you have some inside knowledge I don't know about? :mis:

.

I exercise and I have experience.. :wve: It aslways worked for me, getting my iPod, climbing onto the jogging machine and only getting off to have a small 2-minute water break... :wve:

danitiwa
07-09-07, 19:38
I exercise and I have experience.. :wve: It aslways worked for me, getting my iPod, climbing onto the jogging machine and only getting off to have a small 2-minute water break... :wve:

Exactly, except I jog in the woods. :p I'll be out for about an hour, run a mile or so, come back, flop down on the couch.

Dingaling
07-09-07, 19:40
Ta guys :). I assume the ache-y pain in my legs after so many minutes (sometime 20, sometimes 30) is a bad sign though? :P.

star girl
07-09-07, 19:41
Exactly, except I jog in the woods. :p I'll be out for about an hour, run a mile or so, come back, flop down on the couch.

I exercise for as much as I can take.. I work, I travel around and I keep up with everything else ... If I CAN exercise, then it's all well and good, but if I can't then I go "to hell with it!" :D

EDIT = Dingaling, start exercising slowly.. In the end you would have enough stamina to exercise for a whole hour without any breaks :wve:

Dingaling
07-09-07, 19:47
EDIT = Dingaling, start exercising slowly.. In the end you would have enough stamina to exercise for a whole hour without any breaks :wve:


Do you know how long it would take for me to build up that stamina? Or a good "excercise plan"? I know it sounds if I want this over and done with but I really don't mind excercising once I've got into the thought pattern like I am just now. I have a time set out for when I've to excercise which in my unorganised, laziness (:p) is amazingly brilliant.

star girl
07-09-07, 19:49
It usually differs.. I was able to build stamina quickly last year than this one....

Also the speed on which you're exercising also matters... SO I cant really give you an exact figure, but my guesses are around 2 weeks :wve:

Dingaling
07-09-07, 19:52
Thanks star_girl :). I'll probably be 5 months down the line and not be able to make 30 minutes! :vlol:. Well, hopefully I'll build up stamina and then no belly sexiness. :gay:

myrmaad
07-09-07, 20:00
Studies have shown that small sets of exercise are as beneficial as exercise done straight through, and sometimes they are better depending on the person: for example if you only have time to do 10 minutes twice a day as opposed to squeezing in just one 10 minute set, then obviously two or three ten minute sets are better.

The most important thing is to get your heart rate up for a total of 200 minutes of cardio per week. I would highly recommend getting in weight training on top of the cardio for 3 additional times a week. With weight training you should train to exhaustion before quitting, and build upon your results always striving to lift more weight.

Diet is the most important factor in building muscle.

BtoFu
07-09-07, 21:28
Depends entirely on what goal you have in mind. Losing weight or building muscle. In all my experience I'd say it's an extremely difficult task for both to take maximum effect at the same time since even combinations of cardio and strength training contradict each others input. For example you can't expect the best outcome from 5-10 sets of weights and then hopping out on a thirty minute jog - the muscle fibres you've just broken down will only burn more through an aerobic-based strain on your body. So I reckon the first thng to do is identify what you want out of the time you put in. And it goes without saying really but start slow and steady, over-exertion only leads to those pain receptors shutting your whole body down and then there's NO work gonna get done.

Legends
07-09-07, 21:31
You need to keep exorcise regularly to get any results, and I don't think 4 minutes per day would make much of a difference. One hour + per day, and you are getting somewhere.

Admles
07-09-07, 22:48
It all depends on your goals and your fitness levels.

To start with, if you can't handle the long evercise periods then breaking it up until you build up to it would be beneficial..

That said, however, there are some High Intensity techniques, usually used by professional fighters, where you can get an extremely intense workout done in a short amount of time, such as Tabata interval training. Keep in mind those are used by experienced atheletes; I use them myself.

If you are in reasonable shape, then the trick is to do more work in less time. Circuit training, taking lest rest breaks, working out faster are all methods you can do to get your workout in less time.

myrmaad
07-09-07, 23:02
You need to keep exorcise regularly to get any results, and I don't think 4 minutes per day would make much of a difference. One hour + per day, and you are getting somewhere.

BtoFu is on the right track! But Legends, what you've said here is not quite right.

When you have a person who is either obese, or has never exercised consistently, starting at with 5 minutes is encouraged by experts. For such a person to attempt an hour of vigorous exercise, the next day they would be so sore that they would most likely never attempt it again.

BtoFu's important point is that you do not want to do cardio immediately after weight training to exhaustion. (the right way)

There are personal trainers who do not follow this, but if you are attempting to tear down or "rip up" the muscle which you must do to rebuild it stronger, it is best to do a cardio warmup first, or simply alternate days.

The reasoning behind doing the weight training first and then cardio is to make sure you exert all of your energy on the weight training. I just don't think it's as effective.

My totally ripped girlfriend I've posted pics of here, swears by a 5 day split, working one muscle group at a time: Arms | Legs | Back | Shoulders | Traps
then two days off from weights. Cardio for 20 to 30 is done separately giving muscles the chance to repair/build

My personal trainer recommended CORE stability work on the floor then weights then cardio, but I never got the kind of results from working with him that my girlfriend is able to get following her program.

Again diet is the most important factor to creating a ripped body like her, followed closely by working the muscles to exhaustion.

http://i26.photobucket.com/albums/c117/SeaBlossom/Workoutbkgrnd-2.jpg

Admles
07-09-07, 23:11
Myrmaad is quite correct; DIET is the key.

Whether you are looking to build muscle, or slim down, DIET is the word you need to know.

Remember the basic formula of CALORIES IN vs CALORIES OUT.

If you are taking in more than you use, you will put on weight. If you are using up more than you take in, you will lose it.

Remember there is no one program that will work for everyone. If you want faster results, take up a form of resistance training; cardio doesn't really burn as much fat as people think, its more for conditioning your heart and lungs to work more effeciently. Resistance training will increase your metabolism, thus increasing the rate at which your body burns calories. DO NOT use machines / cables when starting out, concentrate on multi-joint free weight basic movements, and do go training with tiny little weights that you could blow over, use something to challenge you.

However, to reiterate, DIET is the key.

BtoFu
07-09-07, 23:56
Remember the basic formula of CALORIES IN vs CALORIES OUT.


Personally I'm of the opinion that calories matter a great deal, but I don't believe in skimping on meals or even on what the sweet tooth wants. When I first started training seriously I dropped about 20lbs through limiting the food groups - short term solution which works fine until you put on 15lbs in muscle and revert to a more balanced (and beneficial) diet. You body feels inclined to stick on more weight to accompany the muscle growth. The problem I have with calorie counting is that once you get the desired effect it's very easy to let up on it and see the hard work go to pot. It seems counter-intuitive to be eating all day but it's what I do and have been able to maintain 7% body fat for a couple of years now. As far as food limitations are concerned, what's worked for me (surely not everyone but..) is just making sure I let off the carbs at night and knocking up the protein count in the afternoon/early evening. Being too hard on yourself on intake just makes you one cranky ****er in my experience. :D

Admles
08-09-07, 00:18
They do matter a great deal, which is what I was saying.

The old saying "you are what you eat" is so true. You are correct that eating small meals more regularly is the way to go; people seem to think that its over eating but its not, and its taking advantage of your metabolism and speeding it up.

Eating clean and exercising hard, you'd be surprised at how much food you can put away and still look damned good!

myrmaad
08-09-07, 00:22
Sorry but I protein count, I don't calorie count. My goal is 100 grams of protein a day, easier said then done. I do keep track of carbs but I don't do drastic carb restriction, I watch for healthy carbs vs empty carbs, but this is more than I want to get into on this forum. Suffice to say the best attitude is to eat for nutrition rather than as event.

Admles
08-09-07, 03:45
Sorry, when I say CALORIES IN VS CALORIES OUT, I don't mean counting calories as such; I'm just saying if you eat more than you use, you'll gain, and vice versa you lose.

I don't bother counting anything at all; I tweak my diet going by how I look and feel.

Suffice to say the best attitude is to eat for nutrition rather than as event.

Beautifully said. Food is fuel for the body, not entertainment.

I follow the 90% rule. Eat 90% of your meals as good meals, eat what you want for the other 10%. So if you eat 5 meals a day, thats 35 a week, letting you have 3-4 cheat meals.

myrmaad
08-09-07, 03:59
Yes, deprivation is a bad strategy! I didn't mean to sound as if I was criticizing. You've got the handle on it.

Twilight
08-09-07, 04:04
a quick tip that has to do with health: make sure u eat when ur hungry, ur body will keep fat around the stomach so it could hav energy, if u eat meals when ur hungry, u tell ur body that u dont need the fat and theres enough food, thus a flat stomach.
which is probly why skinny ppl say "i dont kno why im skinny, i eat all day!" exactly.

and the food has to be healthy

Admles
08-09-07, 04:31
Skinny people are skinny because they have a high metabolism. Whenever I meet a skinny person who says they eat a lot, I have a look at their diet, and they are NOT eating a lot. If you want to see eating a lot of food, look up the Dave Tate project sometime.

Also, your body does not store fat around the stomach to have energy. Your body takes fat from all over the body when it needs energy, not just from the stomach. Your body has a pre-determined order of locations from which it stores and retrieves fat; you can't choose it.

Twilight
08-09-07, 04:32
still, depriving yourself of food doesnt make u skinny or healthy.

Admles
08-09-07, 04:37
Noone said that it did.

Dingaling
08-09-07, 15:06
Thank you for all the help everyone. I'd just like to say that I am trying to lose weight just now, not trying to gain any muscle. Pardon my ignorance here but what is resistance training? I'm assuming it has nothing to do with shooting aliens in Manchester cathedral? :D

Admles
08-09-07, 22:03
Resistance training is things like weight training and bodyweight exercises such as pushups, pullups etc.

Basically where you work the muscles against a resistance, whether that be a weight, your own bodyweight etc.

If you are trying to lose weight, gaining muscle will help you do it faster than not trying to gain muscle; gaining muscle increases your metabolism and helps you burn calories a lot faster.

Don't be put off by the thought of building muscle; a lot of women avoid it because they worry they'll end up looking like a man. Keep in mind that women produce about 1/7th the testosterone of men, and can't build muscle nearly as fast, or easily. You'll just get stronger and better shaped; it would take you years of VERY heaving training, a special diet (and maybe some 'roids) to look like a man.

A shame we live so far apart; I'd be more than happy to get you started.

just croft
08-09-07, 22:06
IMHO... I would go every time with my way, when ever there is a test there is a long afternoon and a long night of studing without breaks. Except stupid subjects that are so easy and so random they should just be BANNED from schools

mathew9r
08-09-07, 22:13
I can't swim unfortunately and I'm too body conscious to do it. Y'know, having a 1) big belly and all :p. So I'd have to be slimmer before even contemplating learning to swim in the first place :/.



I hope I don't sound rude saying this but is this only just your thought or do you have some inside knowledge I don't know about? :mis:



I already walk every day and excercise on a bike so it's not as if I'm sitting on my bum all day. I was just wondering if it was more effective to do it in "blocks" or all at once. Sometimes my legs are really sore after so many minutes and I'd like to stop but the thought of 'if I stop now it means it won't be effective' comes to mind.
me got big belly too :o

im going to walk everyday for 1 hour so i can lose more (whate)

() me cant spell that good :(

[walking is much better than running for lossing more (whate)]

Admles
08-09-07, 22:31
Actually the notion that walking is better for losing more weight has been disproven many times. The reason people thought that is because it is easier to walk for a long period because it is a LOT less stressful on the body, and people can stick to it for longer.

Jogging / running is hard, hard work, it can be hard on the joints, on the cardio, and difficult on the mind. A good way to build up to it is to jog for a bit, then go back to walking until you recover, then jog some more, then back to walking. Repeat for the duration of your walk, and as you get fitter increase the amount of jogging.

All exercise is beneficial. Its all about conditioning your body, especially your heart and lungs. For losing weight you will get MUCH better results by adjusting your diet.

Walking everyday for one hour you may get bored quickly, I would suggest choosing a handful of activities and choosing a different one every day. That way your body will not adapt to it as quickly.

Oh and you can throw out notions like "1/2 hour of swimming is equivalent to an hour of jogging" and "10 mins of skipping is like 1/2 hour of jogging" - thats all rubbish, they are completely different.