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Earthcane
18-01-08, 13:37
Hey guys.

One of my many New Year's resolutions was to take up reading
a Fantasy book this year.

Fantasy, Sci/fi, Action-adventure- anything that falls into these categories.
I'm looking preferably for a 'sword-n-sorcery' epic or a space opera.

So, any recommendations??

Help much appreciated.

:tmb:

Necromanser
18-01-08, 13:38
The Amber Chronicles by Roger Zelazny.
Quite a long read but enjoying nevertheless.

Earthcane
18-01-08, 13:48
The Amber Chronicles by Roger Zelazny.
Quite a long read but enjoying nevertheless.
Heya Nec.

(*Wiki's Amber Chronicles*)

Sounds like true fantasy, Will look into it.

I guess I also have to take into accont the whole price factor,
since many of thse fantasy sagas go on and on, book after book of material.

I tried to get into Robert Jordan's Wheel of Time a couple of years back,
but I felt the book took too long to really get started and kinda put me off.

Necromanser
18-01-08, 13:49
Try Dune then.It's quite cheap now.It's a very good read.

Earthcane
18-01-08, 13:52
Hee heh, I knew you'd get around to Dune at some stage :jmp:

There are a couple of different versions in my nearest Waterstones.
A hardback special edition (which looks realy cool) and a number of
smaller versions, although few of theses are abridged.

BTW, is Dune a stand-alone novel, or part of a series?

Necromanser
18-01-08, 13:53
A Huuuuge series.But you can stop after reading the first book because it doesn't have a cliffhanger ending.

Earthcane
18-01-08, 14:02
Oh right. The author's Herbert, right?

Is he one of those authors that get majorly wrapped up in their own fiction and
keep on going?? :jmp:

Will get a copy of Dune, the reviews it got are some of the best I've read.

So that's one book down, anyone know any others?

Preferably Sword-and-Sorcery this time, rooted in the same vein as LOTR etc :tmb:

Necromanser
18-01-08, 14:03
Yeah he's that type of author,his son is continuing his series.I think he finished the last one in Autumn 2007.

Earthcane
18-01-08, 14:07
I like novels that incorporate a mythology that draws heavily on realism
and human-nature. I'm a huge fan of typical High-fantasy, (LOTR being
my all-time fave book) but I like a fantasy to be rooted to a world we
can recognise.

Necromanser
18-01-08, 14:11
Actually it is a reflection of our world.Each great house represents a country in the real world.I've been working out which country is represented by which great house.Most of the time I read I think I'm reading about the real world.

Geck-o-Lizard
18-01-08, 14:12
Anything by Iain M. Banks will satisfy your hunger for widescreen space opera. :)

"The Night Watch" by Sergei Lukyanenko is part 1 of a Russian vampire/fantasy trilogy I'm reading atm. I'd definitely reccommend it; it's great. Better than the movie, and the movie rocked my socks off.

The Redwall series by Brian Jacques, which is about anthropomorphic woodland animals in a quasi-Medieval setting. Alright, they're really kids' books, but it doesn't get much more swashbuckling than this.

Welkin Weasels trilogies by Gary Kilworth. More anthropomorphic critters (mainly weasels and stoats) in a world where humans aren't the most important species. The first trilogy is set in Medieval times; the second trilogy (a Sherlock Holmes parody) is a few generations later in Victorian/steampunk years. They're really humourous, and have lots of references to classic literature that you only pick up if you're not a kid.

Earthcane
18-01-08, 14:24
No I'm not a kid :mis: :p

But thanks Geck-O-Lizard, will check 'em out.

Of course I've heard of Nighwatch- I'm a sucker for a good vampire epic :jmp:
Might look into it.


Havent seen either of the movies but am planning to :tmb:

the second trilogy (a Sherlock Holmes parody) is a few generations later in Victorian/steampunk years.

I have to admit I have a softspot for Steampunk.

I avsolutely loved Alan Moore's League Of Extraordinary Gentlemen,
the references to the victorian-era decadence novels were a real treat if
you knew where to find them.

Even my own 'Clockwork' fiction is an amalgam of a steampunk setting. :tmb:

Thanks, Geck-O-lizard.

Necromanser
18-01-08, 14:28
As Geck pointed out Night watch is also a really good novel.It's basically about the struggle between good and evil and one day a boy will be born and whichever side he chooses will win.And there are three watches,the Night watch(watches the dark side),day watch(watches the light side) and the Shadow(tr?) watch which observes both sides.Watch the film after you read the book,it's also pretty good.

Geck-o-Lizard
18-01-08, 14:29
Oh you might like "The Difference Engine" by William Gibson and Bruce Sterling then. :)

Earthcane
18-01-08, 14:30
I thought the third in the triology was 'Duskwatch?'

@ Nec: the forum censor doesnt like Nigh****ch :D

(*Googles The Difference Engine*)

Trigger_happy
18-01-08, 14:30
I don't know if you'd like it, but I can recommend the "Old Kingdom" series by Garth Nix. They are a trilogy of 3 books, well written and gripping, with clear, and not so clear parallels to our world.

Earthcane
18-01-08, 14:34
Heya, Trigger happy. Hmmm, I was waiting for someone to mention Garth Nix.

He wrote Sabriel aswell, didnt he?

Trigger_happy
18-01-08, 14:47
Heya, Trigger happy. Hmmm, I was waiting for someone to mention Garth Nix.

He wrote Sabriel aswell, didnt he?

Yeap! He's got 2 more books in that series coming out-thought they come out in 2010 and 2012.

Earthcane
18-01-08, 14:51
Is the Sabriel trilogy worth reading? The cover art itself sells the book to me.

Trigger_happy
18-01-08, 14:56
I believe so. For a fantasy novel, they are a little dark: The deal with death, the undead, and the titular character, who has to carry on her father's work.

I persnaly love the book- I think that they are imaginative, unique- the main character's weapons are something totally new- well written and flowing. Then again, that's my opinion. I don't want to go into too much detail, in case you do read them.

Oh, and I have the older version of Sabriel, so the cover is just plain white, with small symbols one- is that the one your referring to? I feel that the newer covers are a bit tacky.

Earthcane
18-01-08, 15:02
Yeah, I ,meant the origianl Symboled cover. It looks very interesting.

Has anyone read any Terry Brooks? He's been dubbed by critics as the modern
Tolkien, how believable that is I dont know.

Angelus
18-01-08, 15:26
Do you like Buffy?

Earthcane
18-01-08, 15:31
^ Can't believe that you're asking me that :mis:

:jmp::jmp:

Angelus
18-01-08, 15:35
^ Can't believe that you're asking me that :mis:

:jmp::jmp:

:p

You seem to like Spike, so I'd recommend this: Blackout (http://www.amazon.co.uk/Blackout-Buffy-Vampire-Slayer-DeCandido/dp/1416526366/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1200670480&sr=1-3)

If you buy it from Amazon Marketplace you can get it for under £5. :)

Earthcane
18-01-08, 15:38
^^ I generally don't buy anything on Amazon, but I think
I know where I can get some buffy novels.
I know a store that sells second hand tv series books.

Spike is cool, but nothing compared to the Gentlemen.

Hush is my fave Buffy episode ever :p

Angelus
18-01-08, 15:40
^^ I generally don't buy anything on Amazon, but I think
I know where I can get some buffy novels.
I know a store that sells second hand tv series books.

Spike is cool, but nothing compared to the Gentlemen.

Hush is my fave Buffy episode ever :p

The Gatekeeper Trilogy is also really good. :) There's tons of Buffy books out there, and a lot of them are really good.

Hush... hm. It's a great episode, but definitely not my favourite.

FomarThain
18-01-08, 15:40
EC pick up the Wayfarer Redemption (http://www.amazon.com/Wayfarer-Redemption-Book-One/dp/0765356163/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1200670774&sr=8-1) books from Sara Douglass. You will not be disappointed I promise!!:tmb:

Earthcane
18-01-08, 15:43
^^ Wayfarer Redemption?

Will look into it, thanx :tmb:

So many choices.....

dinahcat
18-01-08, 15:54
I *MUST* recommend "The Belgariad" and "The Malloreon" by David Eddings. Actually, the Belgariad is a collection of 6 novels and the Mallorean is (I think) 6 more, but they are a series. All quick reads that SUCK YOU IN! They have it all! Sorcery, romance, laugh out loud comedy, mystery intrigue...WOW! I read them all once a year.

Oh...and ANYTHING by Terry Pratchett. This man is incredibly hilarious! Too bad he was recently diagnosed with Early on-set alzheimers...we're losing an incredible talent!

Earthcane
18-01-08, 15:56
^^ I heard about the alzheimers thing. That sucks for him :(

ThomasCroft
18-01-08, 15:59
Read all of "His Dark Materials" by Philip Pullman. Fair enough, they're not exactly "sword and sorcery" really, but it's such an amazing read overall you can't miss out on it.

Earthcane
18-01-08, 16:06
^^ I've read 'em all :D

Northern Lights remains a classic of the genre.

Pipolinne
18-01-08, 17:42
The Abhorsen Trilogy,by Garth Nix (http://www.garthnix.co.uk/books_kingdom_landing).


I first read Liraeland the first feeling was that this fantasy book had a bit of a more depressing,yet deep and mature start. But,then...well,it's excellent. S&S, necromancers,zombies,all wrapped in a completely different way,but,above all,intelligence and sensitivity.

Elric's Saga by Michael Moorcock. (http://www.stormbringer.net/elric.html) Pure S&W,though Elric is far from being the traditional S&W hero,and that's why is so fascinating!

la-la-lara
18-01-08, 17:59
Steven King’s “Dark Tower”. ;)

Necromanser
19-01-08, 00:34
The Abhorsen Trilogy,by Garth Nix (http://www.garthnix.co.uk/books_kingdom_landing).


I first read Liraeland the first feeling was that this fantasy book had a bit of a more depressing,yet deep and mature start. But,then...well,it's excellent. S&S, necromancers,zombies,all wrapped in a completely different way,but,above all,intelligence and sensitivity.

Elric's Saga by Michael Moorcock. (http://www.stormbringer.net/elric.html) Pure S&W,though Elric is far from being the traditional S&W hero,and that's why is so fascinating!
Necromancers you say.