PDA

View Full Version : Media Coursework.


remote91
22-01-08, 16:06
I know alot of you guys do media, and part of the coursework is to make a 5 minute opening for a thriller film. Now, I have a week to get a good idea together and pitch it to my teacher.

Can anyone give me some good idea's as to what could happen in my opening? I need inspiration :D

kill bill
22-01-08, 16:09
Film making? I'm doin that pro in school atm for fun. For an intro its best to show scenes of the charatcers and show their real life names - just a suggestion

Rivendell
22-01-08, 16:13
For an intro its best to show scenes of the charatcers and show their real life names - just a suggestion

For a sitcom perhaps, but for a thriller?

It totally depends. I know it sounds silly, but seriously - think of something thrilling ;)

Something that isn't too hard to film either, helps. A chase scene perhaps. Why is the person / people being chased? What have they done?
Who is chasing them? What will they do if they catch them?
Do they get caught?

:wve:

remote91
22-01-08, 16:41
Why is the person / people being chased? What have they done?
Who is chasing them? What will they do if they catch them?
Do they get caught?

:wve:
That helps Riv :D Its just really hard for me to get a good grip on an idea that I like.

Can anybody tell me what they think the opening of a good thriller film would have in it?

Punaxe
22-01-08, 18:17
That helps Riv :D Its just really hard for me to get a good grip on an idea that I like.

Can anybody tell me what they think the opening of a good thriller film would have in it?

A lot of questions...

Limblifter
22-01-08, 19:05
Something that isn't too hard to film either, helps. A chase scene perhaps. Why is the person / people being chased? What have they done?
Who is chasing them? What will they do if they catch them?
Do they get caught?

:wve:

This is thinking in the right direction. For a thriller, you want to ask a lot of questions. [Although, if you're having to actually film this at a later date, stay away from chase scenes. They aren't easy to film (properly).]

Focus on characters, not events. Your audience is always going to be more invested in people rather than action. It's easier to relate.

The biggest thing is to invest your audience, and make them want to find out more. Offer up no explanations. Judging by your avatar, I'm going to assume you're familiar with Alias. Think about the pilot episode, first scene. You're introduced to this character: why is her hair red?; She's being tortured: what has she done?; She's not speaking english: where is she?; We never get an answer to any of these questions, but they work to make things very exciting. All of these kind of questions make the character inherently more interesting and exciting.

And of course, end on a cliffhanger. ;)

tesorosbaby
22-01-08, 19:49
Just remember that no matter what you choose it's already been over-used, over-exposed and over-cooked.

So don't let "it's not original" stand in your way

remote91
22-01-08, 20:00
Think about the pilot episode, first scene. You're introduced to this character: why is her hair red?; She's being tortured: what has she done?; She's not speaking english: where is she?; We never get an answer to any of these questions, but they work to make things very exciting. All of these kind of questions make the character inherently more interesting and exciting.

And of course, end on a cliffhanger. ;)
Thats so odd you said that because we already planned on stealing that part when the door opens :p

Thanks guys, you've deffinately gotten me into the right state of thinking now when it comes to plotting this so that I can get the best reaction from the audience :D