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Draco
04-08-03, 01:14
THE HISTORY OF COCA-COLA

According to David Roy (http://www2.netdoor.com/~davidroy/cocacola.html)

On May 8, 1886, Atlanta druggist Dr. John Styth Pemberton (former Confederate officer) invented "Coca-Cola" syrup using melted sugar, water and other ingredients. It was mixed in a 30-gal. brass kettle hung over a backyard fire. It was marketed as a "brain and nerve tonic" in drugstores. Sales averaged nine drinks per day.
Frank M. Robinson, Pemberton's bookkeeper, was the person who suggested the name "Coca-Cola", which was chosen because both words actually named two ingredients found in the syrup. They were the coca leaf and the Kola nut. Robinson spelled Kola with a C to make it look better in advertising.
The first year's gross sales were $50 and advertising costs were $73.96.
The original formula included extracts of the African kola nut and coca leaves, both strong stimulants. "Coca-Cola" was one of thousands of exotic patent medicines sold in the 1800s that actually contained traces of cocaine.
One summer, in 1886, a customer walked into a drugstore complaining of a headache and requested a bottle of "Coca-Cola" syrup. To get instant relief, he asked the "soda jerk" to mix up a glass on the spot. Rather than walk to the other end of the counter in order to mix it with cold tap water, the clerk suggested using soda water. The man remarked it really tasted great, and soon after "Coca-Cola" was in fizzy, carbonated form.
"Coca-Cola" was first sold for 5 a glass as a soda fountain drink at Jacob's Pharmacy in Atlanta, Georgia.
In 1888, Asa Griggs Candler bought the company from Dr. Pemberton. Later that same year, Dr. Pemberton died. By 1914, Candler had acquired a fortune of some $50 million. Baseball hall of famer Ty Cobb, a Georgia native, was another early investor in the company.
In 1891, Coca-Cola produced its first calendar.
In 1894, Joseph A. Biedenharn, owner of the Biedenharn Candy Company in Vicksburg, Mississippi, first bottled "Coca-Cola."
By 1903, the use of cocaine was controversial and "Coca-Cola" decided to use only "spent coca leaves." It also stopped advertising "Coca-Cola" as a cure for headaches and other ills.
In 1919, after his death, Griggs Candler's family sold the interest in "Coca-Cola" to a group of businessmen led by Ernest Woodruff for $25 million. Woodruff was appointed president of "Coca-Cola" on April 28, 1923 and stayed on the job until 1955.

COCA-COLA BOTTLES

The first type of bottle "Coke" came in was the Hutchinson stopper-type glass bottle that utilized an iron stopper and rubber washer. Joseph Biedenharn, the first bottler, originally used this type of bottle. "Coca-Cola" was usually written in script or block print in the glass front.

DATES: 1894 - early 1900's
http://www2.netdoor.com/~davidroy/hutch.jpg
The second type of "Coke" bottle was the crown-top, straight-sided, and utilized a cap instead of a stopper. Millions of these bottles were used until imitations became a problem. These bottles came in amber, clear and light green colors, and were also the first to have labels on them.

DATES: 1905 - 1916
http://www2.netdoor.com/~davidroy/straigt.jpg

The latest type of bottle used is known today as the "hobbleskirt" or contour bottle. The bottle was invented specifically for "Coca-Cola" by the Chapman Root Glass Company of Terre Haute, Indiana. They modeled the bottle after a cocoa bean. The bottle was first patented on November 16, 1915, and renewed on December 25, 1923. The actual shape of the bottle was patented in 1960. Coca-Cola first introduced 10, 12 and 26 ounce bottles in 1955.

DATES: 1915 - today
http://www2.netdoor.com/~davidroy/hobble.jpg

FIRST BOTTLER OF COCA-COLA

In the summer of 1894, Joseph Agustus Biedenharn, a 28 year-old candy merchant from Vicksburg, Mississippi, offered the first bottle of "Coca-Cola." It was originally sold at just soda fountains. Biedenharn sold to rural areas around Vicksburg.

COCA-COLA DATES AND SLOGANS
</font> 1886 "Drink Coca-Cola"</font> 1904 "Delicious and Refreshing"</font> 1922 "Thirst Knows No Season"</font> 1927 "Around the Corner From Anywhere"</font> 1929 "The Pause That Refreshes"</font> 1936 "It's The Refreshing Thing To Do"</font> 1938 "The Best Friend Thirst Ever Had"</font> 1939 "Whoever You Are, Whatever You Do, Wherever You May Be, When You Think of Refreshment Think of Ice Cold Coca-Cola"</font> 1948 "Where There's Coke There's Hospitality"</font> 1952 "What You Want Is A Coke"</font> 1956 "Coca-Cola - Makes Good Things Taste Better"</font> 1958 "The Cold, Crisp Taste of Coke"</font> 1963 "Things Go Better With Coke"</font> 1970 "It's The Real Thing"</font> 1975 "Look Up America"</font> 1979 "Have a Coke and a Smile"</font> 1982 "Coke Is It!"</font> 1987 "You Can't Beat the Real Thing"</font> 1993 "Always Coca-Cola"</font>FIRST 6-PACK OF COCA-COLA
In March 1923, "Coca-Cola" was sold in a 6-bottle carton for the first time in New Orleans, Louisiana.

TIME MAGAZINE

The cover page of the May 15, 1950 issue of Time Magazine features a "Coca-Cola" advertisement. It was the first time that a consumer product was featured on the cover of Time Magazine. The issue also contained a detailed story about Coca-Cola's extensive distribution and franchising system.

THE COCA-COLA RECIPE
1 oz. citrate caffeine
1 oz. vanilla
2 oz. flavoring *
4 oz. fluid extract of coca
3 oz. citric acid
1 qt. lime juice
30 lbs. sugar
2 gal. water
caramel
* orange, lemon, nutmeg, cinnamon, coriander, neroli oils, alcohol

COKE & DIET COKE

The brand name "Coke" was used for the first time in magazine advertising in June 1941. The name first appeared on bottles on December 10, 1941. Starting in 1942, the "Sprite Boy" was used to promote this new name. The brand name "Diet Coke" was first introduced in 1982, and is the world's most popular brand of diet soft drink.

DIAMOND CAN

The picture below features the first, flat-top aluminum can of "Coca-Cola." It was a 12oz. can introduced in 1960. Because of the red and white diamond pattern, today's collectors have dubbed the can the "diamond can." "Coca-Cola" was originally made available in cans for the military in 1955.

http://www2.netdoor.com/~davidroy/diamond.jpg

SPRITE AND FANTA

The "Sprite" drink was first introduced on February 1, 1961. In August 1958, "Fanta" flavors made their debut in Boston, Chicago and San Francisco. Today, they're the world's most popular fruit flavored drinks.

BILLIONS OF GALLONS

July 12, 1944 first-billionth gallon of Coca-Cola syrup manufactured.
April 9, 1953 second-billionth gallon of Coca-Cola syrup manufactured.
May 1959 third-billionth gallon of Coca-Cola syrup manufactured.
June 6, 1963 fourth-billionth gallon of Coca-Cola syrup manufactured.
Mid-1966 fifth-billionth gallon of Coca-Cola syrup manufactured.
January 1969 sixth-billionth gallon of Coca-Cola syrup manufactured.
January 1971 seventh-billionth gallon of Coca-Cola syrup manufactured.

The billion gallon marks then came so frequently the Company ceased to record and celebrate them after the seventh.

TRIVIA
</font> The slogan "Good to the last drop," was first used by The Coca-Cola Company in 1908.</font> If all the "Coca-Cola" ever produced were to erupt from "Old Faithful" at a rate of 15,000 gallons per hour, this geyser would flow continually for over 1,577 years.</font> "Coca-Cola" is the world's most recognized trademark...recognized by 94% of the world's population.</font> Every second of every day there are approximately 9,600 soft drinks from The Coca-Cola Company consumed. The Company sells nearly half of all the soft drinks consumed around the world.</font> By the 1950's, automobile service stations sold more "Coke" than they did motor oil.</font> One share of Coca-Cola Company stock, initially bought for $40, is now worth over $16,000.</font> In July 1985, "Coca-Cola" became the first soft drink to be enjoyed in outer space on the Space Shuttle Challenger. A special Company-developed space can was used.</font>50TH ANNIVERSARY
"Coca-Cola" celebrated its 50th Anniversary in 1936. Not only was the popular drink available throughout the United States, it was now quickly becoming the favorite refreshment in other countries. At the 1932 Olympic Games, a foreign athlete was asked if he could speak English. He replied, "Sure, Hot Dog....Coca-Cola."

COKE SIGNS

The first outdoor sign advertising "Coca-Cola" still exists. It was originally painted in 1894 and is located in Cartersville, Georgia. One of the world's largest "Coca-Cola" signs is located in Arica, Chile. It is 400 ft. wide, 131 ft. high and is made from seventy thousand 26 oz. "Coke" bottles.

COCA-COLA TRAYS

For a nickel, soda fountain patrons not only got a glass of "Coca-Cola," but also the fun of watching it being made, then served on a tray like the one below. This serving tray features the artwork of popular magazine illustrator Hamilton King in 1913. Today, this tray (in excellent condition) is valued at over $1,000. One in mint condition would be worth much more.

http://www2.netdoor.com/~davidroy/tray.jpg

THE SPRITE BOY

The famous "Sprite Boy" was created by noted artist Haddon Sundblom and was used for the first time in 1942 advertising to introduce the name "Coke." Early ads showed him in a soda jerk's cap, but later he was fitted with the bottle cap. People associated the "Sprite Boy" with "Coca- Cola," so Coke created ads that combined the "Sprite Boy" and the new name "Coke" in one ad. This move helped consumers associate "Coca-Cola" with the new, unfamiliar name "Coke."

http://www2.netdoor.com/~davidroy/spriteb.jpg

COCA-COLA AND WWII

-- General Dwight D. Eisenhower sent a telegram requesting 10 "Coca-Cola" bottling plants for the troops overseas on June 29, 1943.
-- At the beginning of the war, Robert W. Woodruff, president of The Coca-Cola Company, issued an order to "see to it that every man in uniform gets a bottle of Coca-Cola for five cents wherever he is and whatever it costs the Company."
-- At the outbreak of WWII, "Coca-Cola" was bottled in 44 countries. At the close of the war, 64 additional bottling plants had been shipped abroad to be as close as possible to combat areas in Europe and the Pacific.
-- The presence of "Coca-Cola" did more than lift the morale of the troops. In many areas, it gave local people in those countries their first taste of "Coke" and paved the way for unprecedented worldwide growth for "Coca-Cola" after the war.
-- More than five billion bottles of "Coca-Cola" were consumed by military personnel during World War II.
-- When WWII began, The Coca-Cola Company's use of sugar in the manufacturing of syrup for civilian consumption was restricted to 50% of its prewar average due to rationing. The rationing ended in August, 1947.

tlr online
04-08-03, 01:16
LOL!

Isabella
04-08-03, 01:18
who knew?

Annacia
04-08-03, 01:21
What a history.

Good evening dear http://www.tombraiderforums.com/images/smilies/love1.gif

and thank you for saying hello!

Celli
04-08-03, 01:22
I've heard that when the syrup for Coke is being shipped, it needs a Hazardous material sign on the truck because the rawest form of the syrup is so toxic...... http://www.tombraiderforums.com/images/smilies/silent.gif

Draco
04-08-03, 01:24
Originally posted by Celli:
I've heard that when the syrup for Coke is being shipped, it needs a Hazardous material sign on the truck because the rawest form of the syrup is so toxic...... http://www.tombraiderforums.com/images/smilies/silent.gif The Red House has no comment at this time...

Fugitive Lara
04-08-03, 01:26
really? :eek: don't u drink it then celli?

Celli
04-08-03, 01:31
I'm friends with a ton of people on the track team, and they all tell me that they don't drink Coke because it eats away at the calcium in your bones and makes them deteriorate....

And I'm trying to cut the Coke off.

TRChik
04-08-03, 01:33
wow. Coke definately has a long history http://www.tombraiderforums.com/images/smilies/tongue.gif

Trinity34
04-08-03, 03:35
Thanks Draco. That was very informative.

My parents collect a lot of the coca cola antiques... especially the items with santa claus drinking a coke. http://www.tombraiderforums.com/images/smilies/smile.gif

BlackRose
04-08-03, 04:20
i'm glad there isn't any cocaine left in it now.. i thought that was so funny the first time i found out.
how did you find this stuff out?? a little too much free time on your hands? ;)

Celli
04-08-03, 05:01
Originally posted by BlackRose:
i'm glad there isn't any cocaine left in it now.. i thought that was so funny the first time i found out.
how did you find this stuff out?? a little too much free time on your hands? ;) Whoa, cocaine?? :eek:

Draco
04-08-03, 05:41
Originally posted by Celli:
</font><blockquote>quote:</font><hr />Originally posted by BlackRose:
i'm glad there isn't any cocaine left in it now.. i thought that was so funny the first time i found out.
how did you find this stuff out?? a little too much free time on your hands? ;) Whoa, cocaine?? :eek: </font>[/QUOTE]Opium to be more precise...

ELEN
04-08-03, 07:38
WOW Draco!!! That was good!!!!!!! :D

conorcroft2001
04-08-03, 13:26
Great topic Draco!

By the way - I have Broadband everyone and it's totally amazing!

I did a few caffeine experiments on coke, chocolate, coffee and tea a few years back when I was in our school's chemistry club. I went to Edinburgh with the club - an amazing experience. We came to the conclusion that there was more dissolved caffeine in coke per millilitre to a cup of coffee. A shocking conclusion.

Conor.

http://www.tombraiderforums.com/images/smilies/jumper.gif http://www.tombraiderforums.com/images/smilies/jumper.gif http://www.tombraiderforums.com/images/smilies/jumper.gif http://www.tombraiderforums.com/images/smilies/jumper.gif http://www.tombraiderforums.com/images/smilies/music1.gif http://www.tombraiderforums.com/images/smilies/music2.gif http://www.tombraiderforums.com/images/smilies/pistol.gif http://www.tombraiderforums.com/images/smilies/pillow.gif

Bokkie
04-08-03, 13:56
Draco: Opium to be more precise...Chocolate, cofee and Coca-Cola act like drugs because there is an alcaloide called cofeine inside http://www.tombraiderforums.com/images/smilies/smile.gif

Sorry, Draco, it's a cofeine, not opium ;)

mazzymike
04-08-03, 14:04
Wow :eek: who knew http://www.tombraiderforums.com/images/smilies/tongue.gif

Draco
04-08-03, 22:40
Originally posted by Bokkie:
</font><blockquote>quote:</font><hr />Draco: Opium to be more precise...Chocolate, cofee and Coca-Cola act like drugs because there is an alcaloide called cofeine inside http://www.tombraiderforums.com/images/smilies/smile.gif

Sorry, Draco, it's a cofeine, not opium ;) </font>[/QUOTE]Bokkie, Coke used to have Coke in it, we aren't talking about the later appended additive... ;)

Bokkie
04-08-03, 22:53
OK, I'm going to find my book of Organic Chemistry (passed that exam 3 years ago) to check that out ;)

gonga
21-08-03, 05:07
BTW, Celli is right...there is clinical evidence of a correlation between cola consumption and osteoporosis. Most colas have phosphoric acid, which when present in the diet even in relatively small quantities interferes with the absorption of calcium. Teenagers, especially girls, should not drink it regularly.

shandroid
21-08-03, 14:36
Yeah, good luck on yanking the diet Coke from teenage girls' hands. It is true that phosphorus leeches calcium from the body. I say, if you want your pop, take a calcium supplement, which teenagers should be doing anyway.

justin
21-08-03, 14:39
great now i'm told about this... *guzzles 2-liter of phosphoric acid*

NatEcho
21-08-03, 19:50
I have a couple of these.. Three actually, come to think of it...

Great to have bambuu-sticks in!! (sp?)

Celli
21-08-03, 20:50
Originally posted by gonga:
BTW, Celli is right...there is clinical evidence of a correlation between cola consumption and osteoporosis. Most colas have phosphoric acid, which when present in the diet even in relatively small quantities interferes with the absorption of calcium. Teenagers, especially girls, should not drink it regularly.Wow! I was actually right on something? :eek: :D lol jk ;)