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Capt. Murphy
12-05-08, 16:59
I wasn't aware of just how many things were called something different on the other side of the pond. :p

http://www.woodlands-junior.kent.sch.uk/customs/questions/americanbritish.html

What made me really wonder was once, there was a guest at the hotel I work at, they had an 'English' accent and they asked for "Plasters". I had no idea what that was. :vlol:

Rexie
12-05-08, 17:02
A chemist is a person who works in a drugstore.

O_O


*hopes no Sonera (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sonera) employees found that site*

digitizedboy
12-05-08, 17:02
I wasn't aware of just how many things were called something different on the other side of the pond. :p

http://www.woodlands-junior.kent.sch.uk/customs/questions/americanbritish.html

What made me really wonder was once, there was a guest at the hotel I work at, they had an 'English' accent and they asked for "Plasters". I had no idea what that was. :vlol:

lol I like this. You Americans are strange with your lingo. lol Just kidding. It's great though to see the differences between us. Personally I think our choices of language for things are better. ;)

NightWish
12-05-08, 17:07
I prefer something in the middle :p

Mad Tony
12-05-08, 17:10
Interesting. :tmb: I've always used a mix of both. For example, ever since I can remember, I've always said elevator. :p

It's funny how one language can have an entire array of different meanings for words (like American/Australian/British English).

jamieoliver22
12-05-08, 17:12
You know what always does my head in? On software installations, it always says "US English" and "International English" - erm, why are we classed as International English? It is our sodding language, bloody yanks stealing it from us :p

But yeah, we do tend to use a lot of American English words over here too.

Melonie Tomb Raider
12-05-08, 17:12
Yanks FTW!! :yah:

One of my close online English friends taught me what "kip" meant. I remember him saying something like, "Well I need to get some kip, I'll ttyl." I was like, "Kip? What's kip?" LOL! :vlol:

Elysia
12-05-08, 17:16
We get the best words... I much prefer our version of pants, especially! :tmb: :D (I contrive an endless amount of amusement from American literature where people are described as wearing pants - all I can imagine is people running around in their Y fronts all day!) I hardly use any Americanisms - I just like the weirdieness and diversity of our language, especially our slang.

However, your American habit of calling your bum your fanny scares me... I remember the first time Marge Simpson tried to get Lisa to buy a par of dungarees because they had 'a starfish on the fanny'... I nearly choked on my tea! In the UK, you could get arrested for saying that to an eight year old... :pi:

Quasimodo
12-05-08, 17:17
Colloquialisms are always amusing ;) I've already picked up on a lot of British English terms through the Harry Potter series, East Enders, and of course TRF.

We get the best words... I much prefer our version of pants, especially! :tmb: :D (I contrive and endless amount of amusement from American literature where people are described as wearing pants - all I can imagine is people running around in their Y fronts all day!) I hardly use any Americanisms - I just like the weirdieness and diversity of our language, especially our slang.

However, your American habit of calling your bum your fanny scares me... I remember the first time Marge Simpson tried to get Lisa to buy a par of dungarees because they had 'a starfish on the fanny'... I nearly choked on my tea! In the UK, you could get arrested for saying that to an eight year old... :pi:
:vlol:

I used to think a mustard plaster was some kind of plaster of paris concoction made with mustard!

Capt. Murphy
12-05-08, 17:19
It's funny how one language can have an entire array of different meanings for words (like American/Australian/British English).
Ha! Funny you mentioned that. I was just thinking there are some differences in Australian English too.

It was back when I was in 3rd or 4th grade.... We had an (older) exchange student visit our class. She told us some things, such as words in America mean something else in Australia. I think "Sloppy Joe" was the name for a Shirt(?). In America a "Sloppy Joe" is a type of sandwich (or a "Manwich™").

Mad Tony
12-05-08, 17:21
Yanks FTW!! :yah:

One of my close online English friends taught me what "kip" meant. I remember him saying something like, "Well I need to get some kip, I'll ttyl." I was like, "Kip? What's kip?" LOL! :vlol:Kip? Even I've never heard that term before. Nobody I know says it. :p

jamieoliver22
12-05-08, 17:22
Kip? Even I've never heard that term before. Nobody I know says it. :p

Kip, as in 'nap' - as in to take a short sleep.

Geck-o-Lizard
12-05-08, 17:32
Scots English > all. ;)

Mad Tony
12-05-08, 17:33
Scots English > all. ;)Don't you guys call chavs "neds"? That never fails to amuse me for some reason. :p

Geck-o-Lizard
12-05-08, 17:33
I think you mean you call neds "chavs". :whi:

Elysia
12-05-08, 17:37
Scots English > all. ;)
Only when spoken vaguely coherently (i.e. never...) :ton: :D :ton:

Mad Tony
12-05-08, 17:39
I think you mean you call neds "chavs". :whi:Tell me, where does the word originate from then? :p

Melonie Tomb Raider
12-05-08, 18:03
I'm still not sure what a chav is, we don't use that term here. :p

Drone
12-05-08, 18:04
I wasn't aware of just how many things were called something different on the other side of the pond. :p

http://www.woodlands-junior.kent.sch.uk/customs/questions/americanbritish.html


heh thanks.

American English sounds easier. Simplicity is all I need

Lonely Istari
12-05-08, 18:12
What are 'plasters'?? :confused:

I love this kind of thing. Right up there with accents and dialects! I sometimes use some English slang. For instance, I love the word "dodgy" :D

And I like to say that I've been on 'holiday' instead of 'vacation'. Some other things just get too confusing.

fries = chips
chips = crisps
cookies = biscuits

:D This stuff always interests me!

I'm still not sure what a chav is, we don't use that term here. :p

I asked this same question myself in another thread in the Mature Gen chat.


Chav (pronounced /ʧæv/ (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Help:Pronunciation), with 'ch' as in chair) also Charv/Charver (pronounced /ʧɑːv/ (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Help:Pronunciation)) are mainly derogatory slang (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slang) terms in the United Kingdom (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_Kingdom) for a stereotype (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stereotype) fixated on low quality or counterfeit goods. It commonly refers to those belonging to a youth sub-culture, often stereotypically associated with a low socio-economic class, a striking dress sense and criminal activity.
The term appeared in mainstream dictionaries in 2005.[1] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chav#cite_note-BBC-20050608-0)[2] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chav#cite_note-Telegraph-20050810-1) There are regional variations; in the North East of England (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/North_East_England) the variant charv / charva is most commonly used (particularly in Newcastle upon Tyne (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Newcastle_upon_Tyne) and Sunderland (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sunderland) areas, where the term originated.) and has been used since the early 1990s, while in the South East of England (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/South_East_England) and South West of England (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/South_West_England) chav is the usual form. The term differs depending on area and dialect; in Scotland, they are known as "neds (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ned_%28Scottish%29)".
Response to the term has ranged from amusement to criticism that it is a new manifestation of classism (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Classism).[3] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chav#cite_note-Wills_Fancy_Dress-2) The term has also been associated with juvenile delinquency (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Juvenile_delinquency), the "ASBO (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anti-Social_Behaviour_Order) Generation", "Hoodie (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hoodie) culture", and "Yob culture (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yob_culture)".

Trigger_happy
12-05-08, 18:15
What are 'plasters'?? :confused:

They're what you guys call "band-aids". Is that right? Where does that come from?

Oh, and another thing- What is with you guys and your hatred for the letter "U"? You miss is out of everything!

Geck-o-Lizard
12-05-08, 18:16
I'm still not sure what a chav is, we don't use that term here. :p

http://www.glasgowsurvival.co.uk/pictures/nedGal62.jpg

Quasimodo
12-05-08, 18:20
http://www.glasgowsurvival.co.uk/pictures/nedGal62.jpg[/img]

We have those, too! :vlol:

Lonely Istari
12-05-08, 18:20
They're what you guys call "band-aids". Is that right? Where does that come from?

Oh, and another thing- What is with you guys and your hatred for the letter "U"? You miss is out of everything!


Oohh. haha. Yes, well 'Band-Aid' is actually a name brand, but that is what most of us here call them. Same thing with Tissues... A lot of people call them 'Kleenex'. Which is a brand name as well.

And I really don't hate the letter 'U'. I was wondering this myself... who decided to take the letter 'U' out of words?? It really makes the word look boring with out it. I sometimes add a 'U' in there just because I like it better. :D But most of the time I don't just because that is how I was taught.

Favorite - BORING
Favourite - much better!

Agent 47
12-05-08, 18:55
You know what always does my head in? On software installations, it always says "US English" and "International English" - erm, why are we classed as International English? It is our sodding language, bloody yanks stealing it from us :p

But yeah, we do tend to use a lot of American English words over here too.

how could they steal a language that we gave them, given our citizens went over setting up colonies, the now American's altered and adjusted English to wipe their hands clean of the motherland:D

but regardless, English has been and always will be a product of England....ergo English, at least unlike most British things it's widely used and successful, at least the Empire created a universal language that is spoken or taught world-wide :jmp:

touchthesky
12-05-08, 19:25
Lol slimmer truck! Lorry is so much easier.

You call glue gum?

Nannonxyay
12-05-08, 19:28
I say cup cake and I'm from Britain. :vlol:

However, your American habit of calling your bum your fanny scares me... I remember the first time Marge Simpson tried to get Lisa to buy a par of dungarees because they had 'a starfish on the fanny'... I nearly choked on my tea! In the UK, you could get arrested for saying that to an eight year old... :pi:

I know what you mean, I saw that when I was about seven and I laughed my arse off. :vlol:

Melonie Tomb Raider
12-05-08, 19:32
http://www.glasgowsurvival.co.uk/pictures/nedGal62.jpg

ROFL!!! :vlol:

I'm not sure what I'd call them. :p Wild kids, perhaps. :vlol:

Cochrane
12-05-08, 19:39
I'm always horribly confused by this all. In school, I learned british english, thanks to Germany being closer to Great Britain than to the US. Now, on the internet, the majority of what I read is american, with a significant amount of british thrown in as well. Movies and games are all mostly american, as is my spell checker (I could change it, but I can't find the time to bother). Which means the english coming out of me is likely a rather peculiar mix.

Agent 47
12-05-08, 19:39
ROFL!!! :vlol:

I'm not sure what I'd call them. :p Wild kids, perhaps. :vlol:

Larger Louts or simply Louts will be fine aka a menace to society :D

two more..

Hood (US) = Bonnet (UK) front of car
Trunk (US) = Boot (UK) rear of car

Admles
12-05-08, 23:43
hmmmmmm be interesting to see a British vs Australian one....

Larapink
12-05-08, 23:53
I obviously love British English. ;)

But some words in America are quite funny, like the appropriate word for Sweets is Sweets but they just like to call it Candy.

But oh well we are all talking English at the end of the day it's nearly all the same. ;)

http://www.glasgowsurvival.co.uk/pictures/nedGal62.jpg
:vlol::vlol::vlol::vlol: EWWW CHAVS! (The lowest form of people in this country)

For the meaning of what a Chav is look here:http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=chav

Have a look at Vicky Pollard for the Classic meaning of what a Chav is she is from Little Britain a comedy show about Britain ;)...:
Lw1spHP1EE&fmt=18
T3HfCTz74U&fmt=18

Look what I found :vlol::
http://media.urbandictionary.com/image/page/chav-33384.jpg It's a Chav Box! forget Xbox Chav's love to play Chav Box! lol.

Encore
13-05-08, 00:34
Have a look at Vicky Pollard for the Classic meaning of what a Chav is she is from Little Britain a comedy show about Britain ;)...:


I love that show!!!! And that is one of the funniest characters of all! :vlol: Awesome

Mr.Burns
13-05-08, 00:45
I think everyone remembers my mix up with the word Fanny. :whi:

Melonie Tomb Raider
13-05-08, 00:48
Hood (US) = Bonnet

Hood can also mean a dangerous part of town, or more so, a ghetto part of town. That's the first thing I think of. :vlol:

digitizedboy
13-05-08, 01:03
I think everyone remembers my mix up with the word Fanny. :whi:

lol that makes me burst out of laughter when I hear the word fanny, because americans use it for butt. But us brits use it for eerrrr. lol.

Lonely Istari
13-05-08, 01:07
lol that makes me burst out of laughter when I hear the word fanny, because americans use it for butt. But us brits use it for eerrrr. lol.

:yik: What do Brits use the word Fanny for?? lol I'm scared to know...

Larapink
13-05-08, 01:09
Hood can also mean a dangerous part of town, or more so, a ghetto part of town. That's the first thing I think of. :vlol:
We have those here too mostly but in council estates and in caravan parks, they are all occupied with people who are Chavs with most chavs with an ASBO to thier name. :vlol:

Mr.Burns
13-05-08, 01:10
:yik: What do Brits use the word Fanny for?? lol I'm scared to know...

Female genitalia.

digitizedboy
13-05-08, 01:10
:yik: What do Brits use the word Fanny for?? lol I'm scared to know...

errr? You really want me to say? Female anatomy I guess. lol

Lonely Istari
13-05-08, 01:12
Lmao! Seriously? That's hilarious! :vlol:I'll be sure never to refer to my 'bum' as my 'fanny' then whenever I'm in the UK!

Larapink
13-05-08, 01:13
If someone still doesn't know what a Chav is please show them my post in the future. ;)
http://www.tombraiderforums.com/showpost.php?p=2702065&postcount=32

Twilight
13-05-08, 01:13
the closest thing i can relate to a chav is a "wannabe gangsta".

i say "mate" sometimes, but that's an effect of being here alot.

i came across "Snog" whilst reading Harry Potter. very confusing "they were what? huh?" then finally realized it meant 'kiss'.

US term- Fanny is like "fanny pack" around the buttocks area.
i suppose saying that is like saying the "p" word.

Larapink
13-05-08, 01:19
If you accidently call someone a Mate in America they think your werido, to them that is a relationship parter. When we say Mate we mean Friend. :tmb: :) I personally don't use Mate because it causes too much confusion.

Lonely Istari
13-05-08, 01:19
the closest thing i can relate to a chav is a "wannabe gangsta".

That's the only thing I can think of to call them too. :D

i came across "Snog" whilst reading Harry Potter. very confusing "they were what? huh?" then finally realized it meant 'kiss'.


I did the same thing. I love the term though now that I've read about it so much! :p

Another term I've just remembered. You Brits call a cigarette a 'fag'. That's a deragatory term here.

Larapink
13-05-08, 01:21
That's the only thing I can think of to call them too. :D

Another term I've just remembered. You Brits call a cigarette a 'fag'. That's a deragatory term here.
Come on call them CHAVS. ;)

No, Fag has the same meanigs here, also for the cigarette and also from a deragatory term here too.

Conway
13-05-08, 01:26
Well, here where I live, our English is pretty much our own; that is, tweaked American English. Figures why I'm not familiar with some terms used by Brits. :p

Larapink
13-05-08, 01:29
Figures why I'm not familiar with some terms used by Brits. :p
Keep reading this thread you might learn some British words. ;)

Also am I the only British person who is online right now? :confused:

Twilight
13-05-08, 01:31
Come on call them CHAVS. ;)

No, Fag has the same meanigs here, also for the cigarette and also from a deragatory term here too.

Chav doesnt have the same effect as "wanksta/wannabe gansta". :P

Larapink
13-05-08, 01:33
But to call them a CHAV in public is quicker for them to be humiliated. ;)

Twilight
13-05-08, 01:36
i see...but here they wouldnt even know the meaning of it.

what other slang do you use?

Larapink
13-05-08, 01:39
i see...but here they wouldnt even know the meaning of it.

what other slang do you use?
True.

Well you should read this a guide for British slang for Americans:http://www.effingpot.com/slang.shtml

Twilight
13-05-08, 01:45
nice link. ive seen "arse" a few times here.

"Bang" means the same, but also with hair.

"Bloody" sounds a bit like the ever-useful F word.
no wait...that would be "Bugger"

"Codswallop" is like "bull****"

"Excuse me" means the same thing.

Lonely Istari
13-05-08, 01:47
Come on call them CHAVS. ;)

I just call them "dumb." :p

No, Fag has the same meanigs here, also for the cigarette and also from a deragatory term here too.

What I meant is that we don't use the term 'fag' for cigarette here. We just call them 'cigarettes.' Or 'cigs.' Or 'smokes.'

Larapink
13-05-08, 01:50
I just call them "dumb." :p



What I meant is that we don't use the term 'fag' for cigarette here. We just call them 'cigarettes.' Or 'cigs.' Or 'smokes.'
Most people here say "Oi!!!, you CHAV!":vlol: that gets to them all the time! :vlol:

Oh right, I understand. :o

Lonely Istari
13-05-08, 01:53
Most people here say "Oi!!!, you CHAV!":vlol: that gets to them all the time! :vlol:

Oh right, I understand. :o


OH! I just thought of a term that used to be used a lot here for your Chavs... I don't really hear it any more, but we used to call them "posers" because they were trying to be something that they werent. i.e. posing as something they're not. :D

Twilight
13-05-08, 01:55
^ still "poser" isnt As deragatory.

i hear "Nice one!" alot here.

Larapink
13-05-08, 01:57
OH! I just thought of a term that used to be used a lot here for your Chavs... I don't really hear it any more, but we used to call them "posers" because they were trying to be something that they werent. i.e. posing as something they're not. :D
When you say "Oi!!! you CHAV!" you need a Cockney English accent to go along with that phase. Well that is hard for me to pull off since I have an accent like Lara/Keely Hawes I have a well spoken accent. :)

Awesome, people should start using that poser term for Chav's in America.

Agent 47
13-05-08, 02:04
Jade Goody is a walking talking joke....total Queen of CHAVS:vlol:

Larapink
13-05-08, 02:05
Jade Goody is a walking talking joke....total Queen of CHAVS:vlol:
Yes she is second in the line of famous Chavs but don't forget Vicky Pollard she is the queen on the Chav's.

Rachel Croft
13-05-08, 02:11
I wasn't aware of just how many things were called something different on the other side of the pond. :p

http://www.woodlands-junior.kent.sch.uk/customs/questions/americanbritish.html

What made me really wonder was once, there was a guest at the hotel I work at, they had an 'English' accent and they asked for "Plasters". I had no idea what that was. :vlol:

most of the translations our most of what we use over here too

Mr.Burns
13-05-08, 02:28
Twilight, do not bypass the censor.

spikejones
13-05-08, 02:32
yeah, well some of that stuff is just wrong I'm guessing.
for example:

surgery - doctors office


In the US, surgery is an action, not a noun. Surgery is where you cut a person open to operate on them. a synonym of surgery would operation. Is surgery really used as a noun in the British vernacular?

and another

cashier - teller

at the stores, we call them cashiers. at the bank is the only time that we call them tellers. it kinda has something to do with the fact that the ATMs (automated teller machinces) are called thus. When we fill out an application to work at a store, no one puts down "teller" as the position applied for. At a bank on the other hand...

and what is this:

scotch pancakes - flapjacks

I don't even know what a flapjack is. If it is what I am thinking, we call them "pancakes" or "hot cakes"


grill - broil ???

so are you saying that you grill things in the oven (because that is where we broil things)? we grill things on a grill. I'm so confused now that I feel it is necessary to describe what a grill is. It uses coal or gas to create an open flame. A grate is placed above the flame and the food is placed on the grate. So if that is how we grill, and you grill in the oven (which is where we broil), what do you call the thing that we call a grill?????


and one more that confuses me:

suspenders - holds up stockings

do you mean a woman's garter belt???:D



EDIT: in reviewing this post, I see a lot of talk about these chav characters. That picture that was posted looks to me to be just some high school or college aged kids out having some fun getting drunk. BUT, from reading other threads and hearing how derogatory sounding it is supposed to be and that they are "wankstas", a more derogatory term I could offer up for us Americans would be wigger, of course it only makes sense if said person was white....

ihatecold17
13-05-08, 04:06
I love the differences. I want to know where american english came from, like how the accent evolved and such. I like to try to use a balance of them though. theres a girl in my school from england (dont know where, sorry) and we have to swim in our PE classes, and she said she had to buy a swimming costume, and it sounded so rediculous to me, and then it occurred to me that Bathing suit sounded weird to her probably. My mom speaks British words with an American accent because both of her parents are from England.

Language fascinates me.

Andromeda66
13-05-08, 05:31
English from ENGLAND is International English? LOL :vlol: Thats a new one.

Elysia
13-05-08, 06:26
yeah, well some of that stuff is just wrong I'm guessing.
for example:

surgery - doctors office


In the US, surgery is an action, not a noun. Surgery is where you cut a person open to operate on them. a synonym of surgery would operation. Is surgery really used as a noun in the British vernacular?

and another

cashier - teller

at the stores, we call them cashiers. at the bank is the only time that we call them tellers. it kinda has something to do with the fact that the ATMs (automated teller machinces) are called thus. When we fill out an application to work at a store, no one puts down "teller" as the position applied for. At a bank on the other hand...

and what is this:

scotch pancakes - flapjacks

I don't even know what a flapjack is. If it is what I am thinking, we call them "pancakes" or "hot cakes"


grill - broil ???

so are you saying that you grill things in the oven (because that is where we broil things)? we grill things on a grill. I'm so confused now that I feel it is necessary to describe what a grill is. It uses coal or gas to create an open flame. A grate is placed above the flame and the food is placed on the grate. So if that is how we grill, and you grill in the oven (which is where we broil), what do you call the thing that we call a grill?????


and one more that confuses me:

suspenders - holds up stockings

do you mean a woman's garter belt???:D

You wait until we start going on about 'going down the Quack's'... :p (Quack is slang for a doctor). If you go past the Doctor's in the UK, it will invariably say 'Doctor's Surgery' on the front somewhere (I actually think the verb was derived from the noun originally - surgeries were always called surgeries, and so what the doctors did in them inevitably got called surgery, too).

A Cashier works exclusively with money. Someone who works behind the till in a shop is a checkout girl / boy / worker. Or just works behind the till. I think they're officially called cashiers, but no one calls them that...

Flapjacks over here are made with oats and sugar and golden syrup and are yummy... :D Also, we hardly ever eat those thick pancake things you Yanks seem to love (and to eat them with syrup and those patty sausage things? Wrong, I tell you - WRONG!!! The offer that in McDonalds, and no one eats it!). And your obsession with muffins confuses me - do you really eat cake for breakfast?! *adopts Russian accent* You live in topsy turvy world! ;p

To grill is to stick something under the grill and, well, grill it. Like making cheese on toast. You toast the bread, stick your cheese on it and then park it under the grill. Don't American ovens have grills? It's like an open flame / hot plate that is at the top of the oven (normally in a special compartment of its own) and it allows you to put things under to brown the tops of things / cook stuff so that the fat drips out to the pan below. I grill everything! Bacon, burgers, toast, fish, anything with cheese on it, sausages... (But I never broil anything. Wtf is broiling, anyway? We bake, steam, grill, barbeque (your grilling), roast, slowcook, boil, fry... but broiling? For some reason, it sounds soggy to me... :s)

Ahhh, sussies! Suspenders are the bit that holds up the stockings. Garter belt? Men wear garters for their socks...

By the way, if a British person says 'I'm going out to have a fag'... :p

And snogging is more than just kissing - to have a snog means french kissing. It's a great word - a playground staple!

Why do you Americans insist on calling trousers 'pants'? Pants are what men wear under their trousers (and is also a great slang term for when things go wrong or are bad - 'oh, pants...', 'that was pants', 'pants I liked that!'). When people say 'he took his pants off' or 'I've got a new pair of pants', I think 'oohh! Rude!' and 'thanks for telling me that - I don't want to know!'. Funniest one was when there was a thread on a forum one asking what kind of pants people were wearing, and I was thinking 'Denim pants?! What the HELL????' and was understandably reluctant to answer. You Americans, you have craaaaaazy talk... ;)

disneyprincess20
13-05-08, 09:23
When I was in Florida I came out of a ladies washroom (:D) and a woman walked by saying she liked my pants. I got thoroughly confused for a while thinking my underwear was hanging out, and it took me about 10 mins to realise she was talking about my trousers! :o

I can't believe we have "international English". No, we have "Original English"! You Yanks have taken it and made it your own! :p

Mr.Burns
13-05-08, 09:54
The local dialect changes in different parts of the country as well. Most notably where I live, people refer to soda (carbonated beverage) as "Pop".

Trigger_happy
13-05-08, 12:13
The local dialect changes in different parts of the country as well. Most notably where I live, people refer to soda (carbonated beverage) as "Pop".

Yeap its true! In the UK, Carbonated drinks are called things like Fizzy drinks, Fizzy pop or just pop. Soda is actually a drink- its water made fizzy with evil.

Ikas90
13-05-08, 12:35
Australian English has some weird words. Here you'll find a good glossary:

http://www.koalanet.com.au/australian-slang.html

:tmb:

Capt. Murphy
13-05-08, 12:38
Cola, Pop, or Soda (even Soda-Pop). All those work. Those are things like Pepsi, Coke, Sprite, Dr. Pepper, Fanta, RC Cola, etc.

Pan-Cakes. Biscuits. In America there is somthing called Bisquik. It's a mix in a box. From it you can make Pan-Cakes (or Waffles) which you can pour Syrup on and a little bit of butter. Just like French Toast ("Eggy bread"). Or you can make biscuits. These are like thick/dense (things) of bread, except not like bread. It's hard to explain. They are not small wafer/cookie things. Biscuits can be eaten with Honey, Jam/Jelly/"Preserves", or smothered in Gravy.

McDonald's has those McGriddles breakfast sandwiches in England huh? I prefer the one with Bacon more than the one with the sausage patty. But, at the same price. you actually get more to eat with the patty. And it's not as bad as I thought it would be. :)

petujaymz
13-05-08, 13:57
I find myself saying schedule as opposed to schedule.

I'm a Brit, yet I say it the Yank English way.

:wve:

Capt. Murphy
13-05-08, 14:30
I find myself saying schedule as opposed to schedule.
Eh... Wha? :p

Does it sound like Skeh-jewel as opposed to Se-jewel(?) :confused:

petujaymz
13-05-08, 14:33
Eh... Wha? :p

Does it sound like Skeh-jewel as opposed to Se-jewel(?) :confused:

Brit English - Shed Jewel

Yank English - Sked Jewel

:wve:

Admles
13-05-08, 14:52
Australian English has some weird words. Here you'll find a good glossary:

http://www.koalanet.com.au/australian-slang.html

:tmb:

A lot of those words haven't been used in many, many years......

Lonely Istari
13-05-08, 15:29
The local dialect changes in different parts of the country as well. Most notably where I live, people refer to soda (carbonated beverage) as "Pop".


Same here. You must be from the mid west then?

I thought of a couple more!

(US) Apartment = (UK) Flat - I love that one. :D Dunno why. I just like it better than 'apartment'
(US) For Rent = (UK) To Let - I noticed this when I was in Ireland and England last year. I kept seeing these 'To Let' signs and finally I figured out what it meant :p

I love the differences. I want to know where american english came from, like how the accent evolved and such. I like to try to use a balance of them though. theres a girl in my school from england (dont know where, sorry) and we have to swim in our PE classes, and she said she had to buy a swimming costume, and it sounded so rediculous to me, and then it occurred to me that Bathing suit sounded weird to her probably. My mom speaks British words with an American accent because both of her parents are from England.

Language fascinates me.

Same here! I love language!

:vlol: Swimming costume just sounds funny to me. It makes me think of a costume for a play or something. It's either a Bathing Suit or a Swim Suit here :)

Naomichi
13-05-08, 15:50
Yeah, when people talk about 'rent' over here you occasionally drift into 'fags are actually cigarettes' territory, only in reverse of course.

And regarding suits... Formal wear only over here. ;)

petujaymz
13-05-08, 16:02
Potato chips... :rolleyes:

They're called crisps!

:wve:

Angelx14
13-05-08, 16:15
I kind of mix both of them. But I like American English better, AS I know more words from it than in British English. =]

spikejones
13-05-08, 18:46
Wtf is broiling, anyway? We bake, steam, grill, barbeque (your grilling), roast, slowcook, boil, fry... but broiling? For some reason, it sounds soggy to me... :s)

Broil is a setting on the oven that only turns on the top heating element. The oven rack is placed as high as possible and a broiler pan is placed on the rack. Food is then placed on the broiler pan. The broiler pan is basically a drip pan with a slotted plate on top. It allows fat and juices that cook off from the meat to drip down into the pan.

We sometimes call the act of using a grill "barbecuing". It depends on where you live. I generally only call it barbecuing when there is barbecue sauce involved. Like when we cook barbecue chicken or pork. When we do that, we say that we are having a barbecue. Any other time we say that we are cooking out.

Ahhh, sussies! Suspenders are the bit that holds up the stockings. Garter belt? Men wear garters for their socks...

These are images of garter belts (http://search.victoriassecret.com/?i=1&q=garter+belt&s=Garter+Belts&u1=q&u2=s&x=0&y=0) and garter skirts, they are worn around the waist and have straps to hold up those long sexy stockings:D


By the way, if a British person says 'I'm going out to have a fag'... :p

I've heard that before and wondered if it was true or just a rumor. I guess that is where the term "flaming" came from.


And snogging is more than just kissing - to have a snog means french kissing. It's a great word - a playground staple!

Those naughty witches and wizards at Hogwarts!!


Why do you Americans insist on calling trousers 'pants'? Pants are what men wear under their trousers (and is also a great slang term for when things go wrong or are bad - 'oh, pants...', 'that was pants', 'pants I liked that!'). When people say 'he took his pants off' or 'I've got a new pair of pants', I think 'oohh! Rude!' and 'thanks for telling me that - I don't want to know!'. Funniest one was when there was a thread on a forum one asking what kind of pants people were wearing, and I was thinking 'Denim pants?! What the HELL????' and was understandably reluctant to answer. You Americans, you have craaaaaazy talk... ;)
We call them pants if they are long and shorts if they are short (sometimes they are called "short pants"). Men's underwear generally comes in two varieties - boxers (basically a pair of shorts with a fly) or briefs (tighty whities). Don't get me wrong, we still use the word trouser though. Especially when making jokes about a trouser snake!

Angel666
13-05-08, 20:00
I've only ever seen really expensive pants called trousers here. Or if someone wants to sound fancy or sophisticated they say trousers.

Hybrid Soldier
13-05-08, 20:27
"Lollypop Man | Crossing Guard"

LMAO! Lollypop man!? XD

Seb_01225
13-05-08, 20:39
^cos they hold a lollipop!

i dont get the pants thing
isnt pants like an undergarment?

what do americans call chavs?

Larapink
13-05-08, 20:41
"Lollypop Man | Crossing Guard"

LMAO! Lollypop man!? XD
They can be a Womens job too. ;)

lisa_croft
13-05-08, 20:48
Hehe....I have an american friend who i speak to online! He's awesome!!

I say alot of american words but i prefer english words!!

The one difference i hate is: chips, crisps and fries.....

chips here are big chips....fries are skinny chips....and crisps are ... crisps ha!!

our chips are their fries, our crisps are their chips....ODD!!!!!

haha!!

Larapink
13-05-08, 21:02
Hehe....I have an american friend who i speak to online! He's awesome!!
We all have one of those. ;)

Mad Tony
13-05-08, 21:04
We all have one of those. ;)Do we? I know I do (I actually know him in real life), but I can bet others don't. :confused:

lisa_croft
13-05-08, 21:25
i don't know him in real life, no, so....?? but that's not the point....

Angel666
13-05-08, 22:09
^cos they hold a lollipop!

i dont get the pants thing
isnt pants like an undergarment?

what do americans call chavs?

Not here. They're underpants or underwear. Or panties for a woman. I don't think we have "chavs" here, b/c I'm still not entirely sure what they are.

Twilight
13-05-08, 22:37
I don't think we have "chavs" here, b/c I'm still not entirely sure what they are.

a chav is like someone who tries to be "gangsta", like a poser. obnoxious and fake.

Angel666
13-05-08, 23:16
Oh, okay. We have a few of those. Mostly white, suburban, middle-class kids.

Capt. Murphy
16-05-08, 01:19
About these "Chavs"... How is that pronounced? Particularly the C-H.

I got to thinking about this and the word Chavalier. Which you'd say it like 'Kavalier'.

But I've always thought you'd say the "Cha..." in "Chavs" like you do in Cheese.

So which is the right way to say it? :o

----

Some pages back there was talk of the Yank word "Hood". This can be like Neighbourhood - like "In the Hood". It can also refer to Hoodlum (or "Hoods"). Obviously, people from the bad part of town, or a rough lot of individuals. This, I believe, could be closer to the Brit term Chav.

Larapink
16-05-08, 02:27
It's just pronounced Chav like how it is spelled.

spikejones
16-05-08, 02:41
Some pages back there was talk of the Yank word "Hood". This can be like Neighbourhood - like "In the Hood". It can also refer to Hoodlum (or "Hoods"). Obviously, people from the bad part of town, or a rough lot of individuals. This, I believe, could be closer to the Brit term Chav.

Actually the word hoodlum is an antiquated term used in the early to mid 1900's referring to what I like to call "real gangsters". The kind that wore business suits and were more often called mobsters. The kind associated with true organized crime syndicates. The mafia aside, todays gangs such as the bloods, crips, latin kings, etc. are in my opinion highly disorganized and make most of their money off of prostitution, drugs, and robberies. They are a lower breed of animals than the gangsters of old who made their money from extortion and had police officers on their payroll. Odd as it may sound, the gangs of old had somewhat of principles in that they did not stoop to the level that the gangs of today do in order to make their money.

The British term chav relates to those people who try to imitate the dress and behavior of the gangs of today. They call them "wanna be gangsters". That is why, IMO, the word hoodlum is not a fitting American version of the British word chav. Had anyone bothered to read my other post, I have offered up the word wigger as a much newer term that is sometimes (though not widely) used by white folks as a derogatory term for a white person who acts like the British chavs do. Words such as wankster or wanksta are generally used within the black and Latino community which have the same meaning but regardless of race. It is my assumption though that the word chav is mainly used outside of the true gang community and therefore the latter words I have mentioned do not make a true match.

Lara's Backpack
16-05-08, 07:13
LOL Hillarious!!

Australian is a mix of both, and (I dont even understand some of that) and some more of our own words.

We dont say sneakers or gym shoes or Plimsolls (wtf? :vlol: ), we say runners

"Mate, pass me mah bloody Plimsolls. ****in' teacher wants me to go runnin'" Just doesnt fit into our everyday speach :p

touchthesky
16-05-08, 08:49
Now I want a list of Australian/British/American differences.

Capt. Murphy
16-05-08, 12:36
It's just pronounced Chav like how it is spelled.
Why did I even bother asking? :rolleyes:

The Chavs cheered as their cheeky chimp chums chewed cheesey chimichangas and chug-a-lugged cherry... *chordials. :cln:

*Ch= the 'K' sound like in Chavalier, which doesn't sound like the C-h in Chavs.

Thanks LaraPink. :wve: :hug:

:vlol:

ETA: "Hoods" also was used to refer to punk kids back in the 50's (such as the "Greasers"). I seen it in a movie once, so it must be true. :mis:

Aurimas
16-05-08, 12:39
.

Trigger_happy
16-05-08, 12:43
When I was younger, I always thought that drugs were legal in America, and that you went to the Drugstore to buy them. I always assumed that they had everything the same as us, but with a few extras:D

Hybrid Soldier
16-05-08, 14:07
^cos they hold a lollipop!

i dont get the pants thing
isnt pants like an undergarment?

what do americans call chavs?

I just searched it up on google.. and there is a bit of a difference because i thought they held the same kind of stop sign but i guess not. :p

http://img237.imageshack.us/img237/9372/crossingguardatmchenryaut3.th.jpg (http://img237.imageshack.us/my.php?image=crossingguardatmchenryaut3.jpg)

http://img237.imageshack.us/img237/8640/ukf179oy5.th.jpg (http://img237.imageshack.us/my.php?image=ukf179oy5.jpg)

Lmao. Still find it funny though! XD

touchthesky
16-05-08, 14:50
Why did I even bother asking? :rolleyes:

The Chavs cheered as their cheeky chimp chums chewed cheesey chimichangas and chug-a-lugged cherry... *chordials. :cln:

*Ch= the 'K' sound like in Chavalier, which doesn't sound like the C-h in Chavs.

Thanks LaraPink. :wve: :hug:

:vlol:

ETA: "Hoods" also was used to refer to punk kids back in the 50's (such as the "Greasers"). I seen it in a movie once, so it must be true. :mis:

It's pronounced like "ch" like in chase. "av" like in have.

Capt. Murphy
16-05-08, 15:02
It's pronounced like "ch" like in chase. "av" like in have.

Are you sure? Please explain in greater detail.

:vlol:J/K. Don't do that! :p

petujaymz
16-05-08, 15:06
Why do Americans pronounce some of their vowels incorrectly?

Take Semi-final for example.

Oh sorry... rather than incorrectly, I should say differently. :rolleyes:

:wve:

spikejones
16-05-08, 17:16
^depends on your locale, and therefore the accent you use. Depending on where you grew up, it might be pronounced sim"I" or sim"E". Personally, I pronounce it sim"E", as in Hemi (Dodge engine) How do you propose that the brits pronounce it?

jackles
16-05-08, 18:28
I have always believed that the word Chav derives from the gypsy word of 'chavvy' meaning children or young person.

And it's lot of fun to talk 'bling'lish! innit?








Oh and why 'co-lin'? it's col-in! :D

]{eith
16-05-08, 18:52
Irish English beats all!

Hello, my good friend.
Howiya, me aul flower!

How are you today?
Alright, bud?

What are you doing, today?
Story, horse?

That man is intoxicated.
That fella's outta his bin!

Wait a minute!
Stall the ball!

That man is an idiot.
He's only a muppet!

Ordering food:
Buy our cheeseburgers, 3 dollar kebabs, put some garlic sauce on that will ya? 3 bags of chips, nine cokes and a battered sausage.

Calling a taxi:
TAXI! Come back you ****ing ********!

Ordering a beverage:
Pint of Guinness there pal, when you're ready!

I like you very much:
You don't sweat much for a fat bird!


:D

tlr online
16-05-08, 18:54
I wasn't aware of just how many things were called something different on the other side of the pond. :p

http://www.woodlands-junior.kent.sch.uk/customs/questions/americanbritish.html

What made me really wonder was once, there was a guest at the hotel I work at, they had an 'English' accent and they asked for "Plasters". I had no idea what that was. :vlol:

The Queens English rules.

stereopathic
16-05-08, 19:07
i'm knackered from queueing all day so i'm gonna nick some kip. but don't come round 'cause i kip starkers.

Mad Tony
16-05-08, 20:01
Why do Americans pronounce some of their vowels incorrectly?

Take Semi-final for example.

Oh sorry... rather than incorrectly, I should say differently. :rolleyes:

:wve:Most of the time Americans say semi-final (for example), they say it the "correct" way. At least from my experiences anyway.

I have heard some say it differently though.

Mr.Burns
16-05-08, 21:10
It's just a difference with the inflections and cadences (aka accent) common to regional dialect. In the end, nothing is really "correct" or "proper".

Mad Tony
16-05-08, 21:23
It's just a difference with the inflections and cadences (aka accent) common to regional dialect. In the end, nothing is really "correct" or "proper".Amen to that. :tmb:

Larapink
16-05-08, 22:08
I just searched it up on google.. and there is a bit of a difference because i thought they held the same kind of stop sign but i guess not. :p

http://img237.imageshack.us/img237/9372/crossingguardatmchenryaut3.th.jpg (http://img237.imageshack.us/my.php?image=crossingguardatmchenryaut3.jpg)

http://img237.imageshack.us/img237/8640/ukf179oy5.th.jpg (http://img237.imageshack.us/my.php?image=ukf179oy5.jpg)

Lmao. Still find it funny though! XD
:vlol: Our stop sign has too much to read, so the people over the other side of the pond have got it easier compared to our lolipop people.

spikejones
16-05-08, 22:16
Amen to that. :tmb:

"a men" or "ah men"?:p

Mad Tony
16-05-08, 22:17
"a men" or "ah men"?:p"a men". :p
That's how I say it anyway.

Larapink
16-05-08, 22:22
"a men" or "ah men"?:p
It's Ah Men for British English. ;)

Mr.Burns
16-05-08, 22:29
Some say tomato, some say tomaato. Some say potato, some say potaato.

spikejones
16-05-08, 23:01
It's Ah Men for British English. ;)

me too!!:D

JinSlayer
16-05-08, 23:26
Brit: Colour, Favourite ;)

Yank: Color, Favorite :confused:

:p

USP
16-05-08, 23:37
A lot of that isn't even correct. Americans say exhaust pipe all the time. And the muffler is a different part altogether.

remote91
17-05-08, 00:12
..we're superior.

:p

Capt. Murphy
17-05-08, 01:17
:vlol: Our stop sign has too much to read, so the people over the other side of the pond have got it easier compared to our lolipop people.

Us Yanks like to keep it simple. We ain't all that.... *thinks*...... smart, ya know. :)

:vlol:

spikejones
17-05-08, 01:37
Us Yanks like to keep it simple. We ain't all that.... *thinks*...... smart, ya know. :)

:vlol:

yeah, were so stupid we don't even live by our own constitution!!

BTW: Yanks isn't a proper term for Americans. We only call the people who live north of the Mason Dixon line yankees.

Mr.Burns
17-05-08, 03:31
yeah, were so stupid we don't even live by our own constitution!!

BTW: Yanks isn't a proper term for Americans. We only call the people who live north of the Mason Dixon line yankees.

:wve: :D

Lara Croft!
17-05-08, 09:28
Thanks for the site!

Trigger_happy
17-05-08, 10:14
Oh, another thing that really bugs me: the way you Yanks pronounce Data- you say it Daata, and it really gets me. I don't know why, its just so odd.

Mad Tony
17-05-08, 11:10
Oh, another thing that really bugs me: the way you Yanks pronounce Data- you say it Daata, and it really gets me. I don't know why, its just so odd.Wait, how do you pronounce it?

So you don't say Date-a, You say it Daata instead?
Or do you mean that Americans pronounce it Daata? Because I'm sure they pronounce it Dat-a.

As for me, I've always pronounced it Date-a. That's how everybody I know pronounces it at least. But it does get me when people say Daata. :p

Trigger_happy
17-05-08, 11:36
In the UK its Date-a, or that's what I say at least. My phonics are awful- your description of Dat-a is correct for the US, I think.

Mr.Burns
17-05-08, 14:06
I say Date-a and I'm a yank :wve:

Survival
17-05-08, 14:19
{eith;2709409']Irish English beats all!

Hello, my good friend.
Howiya, me aul flower!

How are you today?
Alright, bud?

What are you doing, today?
Story, horse?

That man is intoxicated.
That fella's outta his bin!

Wait a minute!
Stall the ball!

That man is an idiot.
He's only a muppet!

Ordering food:
Buy our cheeseburgers, 3 dollar kebabs, put some garlic sauce on that will ya? 3 bags of chips, nine cokes and a battered sausage.

Calling a taxi:
TAXI! Come back you ****ing ********!

Ordering a beverage:
Pint of Guinness there pal, when you're ready!

I like you very much:
You don't sweat much for a fat bird!


:D

I think I just died laughing :vlol:

lisa_croft
17-05-08, 14:47
It's Ah Men for British English. ;)

I say A-men. I'm a Brit.

I think Ah-men is posh =S

Naomichi
17-05-08, 14:49
I say A-men. I'm a Brit.

I think Ah-men is posh =S

Which would of course explain why I say Ah-Men. :p

Eddie Haskell
17-05-08, 14:52
In my experiences the differences can be major. When in discussions with our British counterparts, often we would (or they) use colloquial expressions that baffled the other. Sometimes words or phrases have opposite meanings to the other side. The one I remember the most is the expression "to table" something. In the US, when we say it it means to not discuss it at that time, but at a later date. To the British it meant to discuss it right then.

Forwen
17-05-08, 14:52
I don't say amen at all.

petujaymz
17-05-08, 14:54
Colin or Colin?

OH or OL?

Colin Powell (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colin_Powell)... XD

Surely it's just how he prefers Colin to be pronounced.

:wve:

Lonely Istari
17-05-08, 16:41
Is this "Chav" thing something new and recent? I just seem to be hearing an awful lot about them suddenly... Why is it such a huge thing? :o

spikejones
17-05-08, 16:43
Oh, another thing that really bugs me: the way you Yanks pronounce Data- you say it Daata, and it really gets me. I don't know why, its just so odd.

I say daytuh (I love phonetic spelling:D)

Colin or Colin?

OH or OL?

Colin Powell (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colin_Powell)... XD

Surely it's just how he prefers Colin to be pronounced.

:wve:

I say cole-in for the Person and the body part
If the name is spelled Collin (two 'l's) Its pronounce call-in

Larapink
17-05-08, 17:58
Us Yanks like to keep it simple. We ain't all that.... *thinks*...... smart, ya know. :)

:vlol:
That sounds like something Larson would say. :mis:

As it appears not all of you "Yanks" are smart. :vlol:It might just be because you don't use the right english.

ihatecold17
17-05-08, 18:47
It drives me crazy when people say aint. Is it a contraction of are not? or what? Because when people say things like "that aint" That are not? Oh Well

spikejones
17-05-08, 19:23
^country grammar.:D

Means the same as both isn't and aren't, which are contractions for "is not" and "are not".

That youngin o' yers aint right in the head!

Yall aint gonna never guess what I jus' seen at the crick yall!

Git er done!!

or actually, l like the past tense of that saying:

Got er did!!

ihatecold17
17-05-08, 20:33
I know. Southern "grammar" drives me insane, and also the fact that half the world think Americans speak like that. No offense to any Southern people, but they just sound....Ignorant.

Larapink
17-05-08, 20:43
I know. Southern "grammar" drives me insane, and also the fact that half the world think Americans speak like that. No offense to any Southern people, but they just sound....Ignorant.
Oh so you don't all say "Howdy...Y'all"? :vlol:

lisa_croft
17-05-08, 20:47
I say daytuh (I love phonetic spelling:D)



I say cole-in for the Person and the body part
If the name is spelled Collin (two 'l's) Its pronounce call-in

wow, very unique!

spikejones
17-05-08, 22:09
wow, very unique!

well thats only if I pronounce the t correctly, most of the time it sounds like dayduh;)

ihatecold17
18-05-08, 02:13
Oh so you don't all say "Howdy...Y'all"? :vlol:


Believe it or not, no haha. I know you were kidding (I hope so I dont look like a butthole lol.) Its just some people really do think we all sound like that, with the southern accent and such.


I speak English better when I'm not on the computer. Its too much for me when Im just typing to other people.

Hybrid Soldier
18-05-08, 02:47
Wait, how do you pronounce it?

So you don't say Date-a, You say it Daata instead?
Or do you mean that Americans pronounce it Daata? Because I'm sure they pronounce it Dat-a.

As for me, I've always pronounced it Date-a. That's how everybody I know pronounces it at least. But it does get me when people say Daata. :p

I say date-a. Tbh it sounds more proper.

GeckoKid
18-05-08, 06:06
what bothers me most these days is how americans pronounces Derby, clerk, Hertfordshire... etc

AmericanAssassin
18-05-08, 06:12
Wait, how do you pronounce it?

As for me, I've always pronounced it Date-a. That's how everybody I know pronounces it at least. But it does get me when people say Daata. :p

I say Date-a and I'm a yank :wve:

I say dat-a... I certainly don't live in the "hillbilly" area either. I've lived in Northern Indiana and around Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. :)

Twilight
18-05-08, 06:13
just 1 thing that bothers me. "Yank" sounds a bit weird. it rhymes too well with "wank"; i just find it odd to call a group of people that.


what bothers me most these days is how americans pronounces Derby, clerk, Hertfordshire... etc

how would you normally hear them pronounce it?

Naomichi
18-05-08, 06:27
In England they're normally pronounced, rather oddly, with an 'a rather than an 'e'.

eg; Derby = Darby

GeckoKid
18-05-08, 06:56
and the Rs are silent...

Naomichi
18-05-08, 07:05
Not in my neck of the woods they aren't ;)

GeckoKid
18-05-08, 07:14
well it's an [a:] in phoenetic symbol...

kinda like... DAH BEE, CLAH K, HAHT FED SHUH...

MrBear
18-05-08, 07:21
and the Rs are silent...

In American? I've been taught it's the other way around: most British accents don't articulate an R sound, but Americans make use of post-vocalic R.. Like the difference in a word like 'bird': generally speaking, a British person would say [b3d]* and an American ['b3rd]*, or at least that's what I've been taught.. I won't be stubborn and argue with any British or American if someone says it's different in their area, this is just what I've learnt about British and American..

* (please imagine that the '3's turn the other way and the 'r' is upside down.. I only know IPA which is not suited for writing on computer..)

Edit: sorry, I misread your post.. You were talking about British English :p of course it was a continuation of the post above you and not of your own comment about how Americans pronounce those words..

Naomichi
18-05-08, 07:57
well it's an [a:] in phoenetic symbol...

kinda like... DAH BEE, CLAH K, HAHT FED SHUH...

Regional variation I guess, given that you appear to be from the North and I'm very much a southerner. ;)

Because I pronounce thusly;

DAR BEE

CL AR K

HART FORD SHER

Hoof Hearted
18-05-08, 12:09
They're what you guys call "band-aids". Is that right? Where does that come from?

Oh, and another thing- What is with you guys and your hatred for the letter "U"? You miss is out of everything!

And the letter 'i', if it forms anything other than the first or second syllable. For instance, ask someone to say the word 'Missile'.

Also they commonly substitute a 'U' for the 'O', so 'Rock' is pronounced as 'Ruck' For instance, George Peppard in the old series of The A Team referred to Murdoch as Murduck.

Now the Australians are even worse. Here Durex is a make of condom, in Australia it's a brand of sticky tape. You don't want to know what they do with Sellotape!

But the Americans win the prize. In America 'Ball Buster' is a Kids Game in the like of 'Mouse Trap'. In the UK it's a euphemism for nymphomaniac female. So now you now know what a Brit means if he describes a woman he has recently met as a 'raving nympho'!.

All this from just a few thousand miles of Atlantic Ocean. It is interesting to speculate on what the future Mars colonies will develop.

Hoof Hearted
18-05-08, 12:11
Regional variation I guess, given that you appear to be from the North and I'm very much a southerner. ;)

Because I pronounce thusly;

DAR BEE

CL AR K

HART FORD SHER

MOOR RON

Just a half please, Landlord

Naomichi
18-05-08, 12:16
MOOR RON

Just a half please, Landlord

I assume you asked for much the same when they were doling out brains?

Obscure
18-05-08, 12:20
This thread reminds me of the time we had an American Exchange at our house for a month. Although a week of it we spent in Spain, I remember we left out Lilo by the pool as we didn't want it anymore and she said:
"Hey, you guys left your floater by the pool"
We were like... :vlol:
Also she called a bumbag a fanny pack :confused:
Oh well. She was great to have around anyway :tmb: In fact I miss her a lot :hug:

GeckoKid
18-05-08, 13:17
Regional variation I guess, given that you appear to be from the North and I'm very much a southerner.

Because I pronounce thusly;

DAR BEE

CL AR K

HART FORD SHER

I'm actually chinese... erm, hong kong...ese

but i guess I speak like a southener, as that's what fellow mates say... and i guess in your case, that R is not a rhotic RRRR, but more like an UH, isn't it?

Larapink
18-05-08, 13:43
Believe it or not, no haha. I know you were kidding (I hope so I dont look like a butthole lol.) Its just some people really do think we all sound like that, with the southern accent and such.


I speak English better when I'm not on the computer. Its too much for me when Im just typing to other people.
You don't look like one of those. Maybe because American southern accents are most recognizable accent to foreigners. Or maybe alot of people like southern accents. I personally love them southern accents, like Larson's TRA accent was really hot :p. But I know there are alot of accents in America and I don't think everyone in America talks with a southern accent.

Same here, I have a better speaking voice. I have an accent like Keely Hawes, I am well spoken. :D

Geck-o-Lizard
18-05-08, 14:30
http://www.americanexpats.co.uk/very%20british.htm

]{eith
18-05-08, 15:00
I know. Southern "grammar" drives me insane, and also the fact that half the world think Americans speak like that. No offense to any Southern people, but they just sound....Ignorant.

K-Fed said it best when he said, 'Uh guess Uh shouldn't-uh ha-did it.'

Lonely Istari
18-05-08, 16:36
This thread reminds me of the time we had an American Exchange at our house for a month. Although a week of it we spent in Spain, I remember we left out Lilo by the pool as we didn't want it anymore and she said:
"Hey, you guys left your floater by the pool"


I don't know what either of these mean.... :o

Trigger_happy
18-05-08, 18:29
I don't know what either of these mean.... :o

Er, a lilo is one of those inflatable giant cushions that you use to relax/get splashed in a pool:

http://www.saltirefashions.com/catalog/images/lilo.jpg

Lonely Istari
19-05-08, 05:41
:o :D Oh! I thought maybe that's what it was... We just call them 'pool rafts' around here... Though that's probably not the right term either. Where does 'Lilo' come from? Never heard one called that before!

Love that Scottish flag one though! :tmb:

Trigger_happy
19-05-08, 11:00
:o :D Oh! I thought maybe that's what it was... We just call them 'pool rafts' around here... Though that's probably not the right term either. Where does 'Lilo' come from? Never heard one called that before!

Love that Scottish flag one though! :tmb:

I think Lilo is a brand name and thats where the name comes from: like band aids. Alas it was the first pic I could find: they didnt have an english one!

Conway
19-05-08, 11:17
How 'bout the word "don"? As in to wear. Is that mostly British or Yank? Example?

Shades? Sunglasses? Which is which?

jjbennett
19-05-08, 11:29
Probably British i would be inclined to think.

On this subject i despise people who say ass instead of arse. An "ass" is a donkey and not the rear of your person, please get it right.

Trigger_happy
19-05-08, 14:35
Probably British i would be inclined to think.

On this subject i despise people who say ass instead of arse. An "ass" is a donkey and not the rear of your person, please get it right.

Oh yeah, that always gets me. Like in American TV DVDs, when an english character says arse, the subtitles say ass?!

Larapink
19-05-08, 14:38
Shades? Sunglasses? Which is which?
Shades = US English
Sunglasses = UK English. ;)

Capt. Murphy
19-05-08, 16:06
Probably British i would be inclined to think.

On this subject i despise people who say ass instead of arse. An "ass" is a donkey and not the rear of your person, please get it right.

When I first seen the word "arse" I thought it was just a dodgy way of saying ["donkey"]. :cln:

And isn't the word "********" a Brit word for a part of the Male anatomy? Or is it like a Bull (a male cow with horns)? Bullocks?

Whoever replies to this... Try to keep it clean. :o Thanks.



Edit: Oh. I see the censor caught it. So it must be a bad word... but for what? :confused:

]{eith
19-05-08, 16:21
When I first seen the word "arse" I thought it was just a dodgy way of saying ["donkey"]. :cln:

And isn't the word "********" a Brit word for a part of the Male anatomy? Or is it like a Bull (a male cow with horns)? Bullocks?

Whoever replies to this... Try to keep it clean. :o Thanks.



Edit: Oh. I see the censor caught it. So it must be a bad word... but for what? :confused:

Well, ******** can refer to the male anatomy but it can also be used to express displeasure, like someone might say 'Oh ****!' (Oh, poo), well someone might also say 'Oh ********!'

Naomichi
19-05-08, 16:22
Yes indeed, it is a term for a part of the male anatomy.

Which part?

The most sensitive parts of the body which arent your eyeballs.:D

Trigger_happy
19-05-08, 17:14
The most sensitive parts of the body which arent your eyeballs.:D

My ears?!...:D

Forwen
19-05-08, 17:41
Little pinky fingers I reckon

jackles
19-05-08, 17:44
Well if someone kicks you there you will know it!!!

spikejones
19-05-08, 19:04
what word are we referring to?

*trying to duplicate it and get the sensor to catch it*

Buttocks? - nope that's not it...
Pillicock?
Pillock?
Plonker?
John Thomas?

edit: well they're not exactly the same length anyhow

Larapink
19-05-08, 19:46
Buttocks? - nope that's not it...
It has the same meaning in here.

jackles
19-05-08, 20:00
An english person would say ' what a load of ********!'


Think Bullocks and change one letter.

Drone
19-05-08, 20:07
is it bollix?

jackles
19-05-08, 20:11
Well thats how you say it Drone :)


It's funny really that the censor won't allow it as it's more slangy than sweary!

Naomichi
19-05-08, 20:17
Perhaps, but just ask yourself if you'd use it in a vaugely formal setting.:p

jackles
19-05-08, 20:19
Depends on how irritated I was!!

:D

Chocolate
19-05-08, 20:21
********?
Funny, my English literature exam is tomorow and I have to remember the quote as a reference: "******** to the rulles!" Irony here? :p