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Fish.
08-07-08, 19:03
My friend was trying to set up iTunes, and I offered to help him. After he requested remote assistance and it connected, I got this error:

http://i134.photobucket.com/albums/q103/Benhead_500/dns.jpg

That's happened with 2 other people as well. Any ideas as to what may be causing it, and how to fix?

Cheers :wve:

jamieoliver22
08-07-08, 19:18
Try using VNC (http://www.uvnc.com/) instead - it is better and probably much safer.

spikejones
08-07-08, 19:42
possible issues with firewall and/or router on either end.

EscondeR
09-07-08, 05:44
1. Your DNS server IP (ISP DNS most likely) must be set in Internet connection TCP/IP settings.

2. If you're using Firewall/router, DNS UDP port 53 must be allowed in both trusted and internet zones.

3. If you're using proxy, DNS UDP port 53 must be mapped or translated via NAT, or DNS forwarding must be on.

To check DNS you can run command prompt and type e.g.:

nslookup smtp.mail.ru

If you get IP address in response, then DNS is set up properly.

Fish.
10-07-08, 17:31
@Jamie: Is that something we both need to have installed?

@spikejones: It's on my end, I've figured out.

@EscondeR: I've tried that, but I can't tell if the results are good or bad. Can you tell me?

http://i134.photobucket.com/albums/q103/Benhead_500/nslookup.jpg

spikejones
10-07-08, 17:53
@Jamie: Is that something we both need to have installed?


VNC is another protocol for remote desktop and is generally used in the Linux World, however it can be used in Windows. Just like with the RDP protocol (or any web service for that matter) one machine must be the server, and the other must be the client. Therefore, it would be necessary to install VNC software on both machines.

Fish.
10-07-08, 17:55
VNC is another protocol for remote desktop and is generally used in the Linux World, however it can be used in Windows. Just like with the RDP protocol (or any web service for that matter) one machine must be the server, and the other must be the client. Therefore, it would be necessary to install VNC software on both machines.
Probably not the best way then, since neither of us know what it is :p

jamieoliver22
10-07-08, 17:58
Probably not the best way then, since neither of us know what it is :p

It is simple enough to use. Basically you run the server, and the other person types your IP into his client and it will connect to you. The options are pretty straightforward.

spikejones
10-07-08, 18:15
^what about NAT handling and firewalls??

I am going to assume that as with most server software, ports for VNC must be opened/forwarded to the proper internal IP address from within the NAT Router's configuration utility.

For software firewalls, the program must be allowed to access the internet (or the ports must be opened) - depending on how the software firewall configuration works.

In the case of connecting with an IP address and the person is behind a NAT Router, you must connect to the IP address of the external port of the ROUTER - not the IP address of the PC (it is a private one and will not be capable of being connected to by using this one) - The NAT router will then receive the request on the port that VNC/RDP (which ever you decide to go with) uses, check it's port forward list for the proper IP address to send it to, and then forward that request on to the PC that should be receiving it.

jamieoliver22
10-07-08, 18:44
Yes, I know that - I was just saying how it worked on a basic level.

spikejones
10-07-08, 19:48
Yes, I know that - I was just saying how it worked on a basic level.

I figured as much, but wanted to clarify how things need to be set up otherwise so that he didn't assume it was just a simple matter of installing and using no matter what your connection is set up like.

EscondeR
11-07-08, 06:16
@EscondeR: I've tried that, but I can't tell if the results are good or bad. Can you tell me?

http://i134.photobucket.com/albums/q103/Benhead_500/nslookup.jpg

DNS (forwarding) works properly...


In the case of connecting with an IP address and the person is behind a NAT Router, you must connect to the IP address of the external port of the ROUTER - not the IP address of the PC (it is a private one and will not be capable of being connected to by using this one) - The NAT router will then receive the request on the port that VNC/RDP (which ever you decide to go with) uses, check it's port forward list for the proper IP address to send it to, and then forward that request on to the PC that should be receiving it.

To use RDP (VNC) one must have:
for RDP:

Terminal services set to Auto and running
TCP port 3389 (by default) open and forwarded or translated via NAT


for VNC:
VNC TCP port (look yourself what exactly) open and forwarded or translated via NAT

N.B.: To change RDP default port (if necessary) go to:
Regedit -> HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\System\CurrentControlSet\Contro l\TerminalServer\WinStations\RDP-Tcp\ and modify PortNumber key.