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demonslayer
11-08-08, 13:54
hi there, is it possible to install windows 98 on my pc as well as windows xp. i have hered of people doing it and wanted to give it a go, i hered i need to make a seperate partition on the hard drive but i have no idea on how to do it.

any help will be appreciated :)

Muhammad
11-08-08, 14:10
You can use an ubuntu (www.ubuntu.com) live cd, but if you don't really know what your doing, you could severely harm your PC.
I suggest you post your PC specs here first.

demonslayer
11-08-08, 16:15
okay, how do i do that?

spikejones
11-08-08, 16:54
if you are starting from scratch, you can create partitions with the operating system installation CD.


BTW read up on the necessary method of dualbooting XP and Win 98 since I am sure it needs to be done in a proper order in order for the machine to boot.

EscondeR
12-08-08, 06:47
1. A second empty partition should be created first.
2. Although partitioning can be done from the XP disk using the modern version of Fdisk, everything on existing partitions will be destroyed. Unless you are going to completely reinstall your older operating system you will need something like Partition Magic. If using Partition Magic, create a data partition and do not use the option “this partition will contain an operating system” unless you plan to use a boot manager other than the one that comes with XP and you want to hide the two operating systems from each other.
Hiding one operating system from the other was necessary when dual-booting Windows 95 with 98 or dual-booting Windows 98 with Me. It is not necessary with XP.
Windows XP can also be hidden from the Windows 98 system by formatting the XP partition with NTFS. Any FAT32 partition will be visible to Windows XP but Windows 98/Me cannot read NTFS volumes.

3. The older operating system must be already installed before starting the XP installation. XP installation is very easy with only one thing that has to be carefully watched. Do NOT use the default choice of an upgrade installation. Ignore the message that this is “recommended”. That choice will over-write the older existing Windows operating system.
Choose “New installation, advanced.” The installation will then go in automatically onto the empty partition. If you have more than two partitions, there is an Advanced setting that will allow you to pick which partition you want XP to be on. More details are at this Microsoft article.

4. After XP is installed, a boot menu will appear whenever the computer is first turned on. By default Windows XP will be at the top and will be the operating system that boots unless Windows 98/Me (called Windows on the menu) is highlighted by using the down arrow key. The default setting has a 30 second delay period in which to make a choice. Both the order of operating systems in the boot menu and the delay time are controlled in a hidden file boot.ini that is located in the root of the C: drive. It is a text file and can be edited with a text editor (after removing the attributes) but it is a better idea to do any editing from Windows XP. One way to adjust settings is to go to Control Panel > System > Advanced > Startup and Recovery > Default Operating System.

One final point is that the early stages of booting XP actually involve the C: drive even when most of the operating system is on another partition. XP installs three files in the root of the C: partition. These files are hidden, read-only, system files and include the aforementioned boot.ini, and two others, ntldr, and ntdetect.com. Dual-boot systems also have a file bootsect.dos. If these get corrupted, the system will not boot so I suggest making a backup diskette with copies.

demonslayer
12-08-08, 20:32
seems like a lot to remember and understand, im not sure on what im doing so im not going to risk it, thanks for the help though guys :D

Offtopic: is it me or does the ubuntu logo look like the scion from TR1?

snoopyeab
12-08-08, 21:32
Of course you could also use something like a virtual machine i.e. Virtual PC from Microsoft or numerous other ones. In that machine you could easily install win98 and run the applications that you wish.

spikejones
12-08-08, 22:29
you can also dual boot on separate drives, purchase a second hard drive and make sure the jumpers on it are set to the slave position and make sure that BIOS sees the new drive as a slave drive. You should then be able (assuming you already have win98 installed) install windows XP on the slave drive - it should place the bootscripts that Esconder mentioned onto the master drive (C drive).

This was the method i used for a few different dual boot configurations - windows xp home w/windows xp pro - windows xp home w/Ubuntu - windows xp home w/Linux Mint.

EscondeR
13-08-08, 05:36
^ If you take that method and modify it a bit, you'll get the safest (OS-wise) dual-boot variant. So:

1. You need 2 HDDs - Master and Slave.
2. Enter BIOS Setup and set the boot sequence to start boot from e.g. Master.
3. Boot and install one OS (any you like) on Master HDD.
4. After installation is fully complete reboot and enter BIOS again. Change the boot sequence to boot from Slave drive first.
5. Boot and install another OS on Slave HDD.

This way you can boot either OS changing the first boot drive from BIOS without interfering between OSes.

N.B.: Try not to write data from one OS to another OS HDD, read only. Especially if you have e.g. Windows and Mac OS X.

demonslayer
13-08-08, 13:37
excellent, i have a spare hard drive that came out of this pc, all i need to do is just re format it so its empty and then i can borrow my friends Windows 98 cd and install it that way, only thing is there is only room for 1 hard drive in my pc so everytime i want to change OS i have to unplug 1 hard drive and plug the other one in ... :(

Of course you could also use something like a virtual machine i.e. Virtual PC from Microsoft or numerous other ones. In that machine you could easily install win98 and run the applications that you wish.

oh yes, i remember installing this, that could be much easier than constantly opeining up the pc and swapping hard drives :D

EscondeR
13-08-08, 16:52
only thing is there is only room for 1 hard drive in my pc so everytime i want to change OS i have to unplug 1 hard drive and plug the other one in ...

Room (hardly believable) or free connector? You can buy another cable with 2 connectors.
Or use HDD rack :)

demonslayer
13-08-08, 19:43
Room (hardly believable) or free connector? You can buy another cable with 2 connectors.
Or use HDD rack :)

i have a free connector on my ribbon cable but there is literally no where inside this pc for another hard drive! ill post pics to show you if you like...?

P.S. where can i get a HDD rack?

EscondeR
13-08-08, 20:53
^ www.dabs.com :)

spikejones
13-08-08, 21:18
also, if your PC's BIOS supports booting from USB device, you can get an external HDD in order to accomplish the same thing. This way would acctually be a bit better than the other method which EscondeR mentioned as the quick boot list should have USB device in its list. I would still for the sake of keeping all OS boot data on the proper drives, disconnect the IDE drive before attempting to install on the external drive.

Or get an IDE drive to swap out with the current one and an IDE enclosure with USB adapter. Install first internally then swap out to external enclosure and replace the original drive. you would then be able to swap between boot drives by bringing up the boot menu by pressing the proper key during POST - choose USB device or internal HDD.

EscondeR
14-08-08, 06:04
^ Exactly.

demonslayer
14-08-08, 18:01
the only thing i can boot from is cd rom drive, hard drive, and lan card i think ....

EscondeR
14-08-08, 18:06
Go for HDD rack then.

I suggest to buy two of one model, put one stationary part into PC, then use both movable parts with different HDDs for exchange and separate boot.

demonslayer
14-08-08, 18:46
yeah seems like a sensible choice... i think ill go with the virtual pc method anyways... thanks for the suggestions though! :tmb: