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tlr online
14-08-08, 23:40
The US defence chief has warned relations with Russia could be damaged for years if Moscow does not step back from "aggressive" actions in Georgia. But Robert Gates said he did not see a need for US military force in Georgia. (WTF! Who said anything about the U.S entering Georgia?! Ed.) His words came as Moscow said the idea of Georgian territorial integrity was an irrelevance.

Georgia's breakaway regions - Abkhazia and South Ossetia - would never agree to being part of Georgia again, Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov said. Earlier, Russia said it had begun handing back the town of Gori to Georgian police but insisted its troops would stay in the area.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/europe/7561586.stm

Which beggars the question. Has the U.S. learnt anything these past five years? Moreover, I wonder why the U.S. feels the need to comment on just about every global infraction that occurs. Perhaps I'm missing something. :confused:

Punaxe
14-08-08, 23:58
(...) I wonder why the U.S. feels the need to comment on just about every global infraction that occurs. Perhaps I'm missing something. :confused:

With relations between every part of the world with each other so tight as they are now, everything relates to everyone in one way or another. It is important that the international community expresses its views on whatever is happening that is of concern. The US is obviously a big part of this international community.

Much has been said about a military peace-keeping force entering the region. I also do not see the need for US troops there; if anything it should be NATO blue helmets. It is really awkward that the peace-keeping troops that have been there before, were all Russian - which is actually against the general rules of such a force (since Russia is involved in the conflict itself).

Forwen
15-08-08, 00:05
Perhaps I'm missing something. :confused:

Caucasian pipelines.

Punaxe
15-08-08, 00:13
Caucasian pipelines.

As far as I know, Russia doesn't export anything to the USA.

Supporting:
http://www.eia.doe.gov/cabs/Russia/images/russia_oilexpdest.gif http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/4/4c/RF_NG_pipestoEU.gif

Crayons
15-08-08, 00:14
It's only necessary, I assume.

knightgames
15-08-08, 00:28
The US defence chief has warned relations with Russia could be damaged for years if Moscow does not step back from "aggressive" actions in Georgia. But Robert Gates said he did not see a need for US military force in Georgia. (WTF! Who said anything about the U.S entering Georgia?! Ed.) His words came as Moscow said the idea of Georgian territorial integrity was an irrelevance.

Georgia's breakaway regions - Abkhazia and South Ossetia - would never agree to being part of Georgia again, Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov said. Earlier, Russia said it had begun handing back the town of Gori to Georgian police but insisted its troops would stay in the area.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/europe/7561586.stm

Which beggars the question. Has the U.S. learnt anything these past five years? Moreover, I wonder why the U.S. feels the need to comment on just about every global infraction that occurs. Perhaps I'm missing something. :confused:


Because we're big enough to kick you ass. :ton:

I'm really not trying to be disrespectful, but honestly, how could you expect the U.S. not to make a comment?

Considering the path my country has taken these last 7 years I understand the hypocracy in the statement issued to USSR, but to not comment would be just as grevious, and I'm sure if a statement WASN'T made others would chime in at the U.S's smug silence.

Kiss-Bite
15-08-08, 00:47
Because we're big enough to kick you ass.

:rolleyes:

EmeraldFields
15-08-08, 00:49
I am just glad that we haven't invaded Russia yet! Jesus, When will we stop putting our noses into everyone else's business!

Andariel
15-08-08, 01:36
More accurately it's the Bush Administration.

Shrantellatessa
15-08-08, 01:58
Coz it's still think it's an absolute hegemon and that this gives it the "right" to intervene to keep "peace" and "freedom." How can an "owner" not react to the destruction of its "property"?

PS. I'm talking here about the government, not the people, so don't eat me please.

Dixie
15-08-08, 02:16
Whachya talking about? The US Gov isn't doing anything. They released a statement. Which they do pretty much any time something happens in the world.

wmcintosh
15-08-08, 02:22
As far I can tell its just words, other then that, the US plays god too much.

rowanlim
15-08-08, 02:22
I agree with Punaxe. There's no need for US troops in Georgia. Plus is it me or is Russia paranoid enough to suspect the aid delivered by the US?

Shrantellatessa
15-08-08, 02:35
Whachya talking about? The US Gov isn't doing anything. They released a statement. Which they do pretty much any time something happens in the world.

Sometimes, statements are the beginning of actions, and sometimes there's no need to threaten everybody in this world just to show power and concern.

Oh! I forgot to add this smiley in my previous message: http://kolobok.us/themes/kolobok-light/images/english_en.gif

Dixie
15-08-08, 02:58
Sometimes, but very rarely.

Didn't France issue a statement as well? I don't see anyone bashing THEIR government.

xMiSsCrOfTx
15-08-08, 03:32
Didn't France issue a statement as well? I don't see anyone bashing THEIR government.

Exactly what I was thinking. :confused:

@Shrantellatessa - yes, but they haven't actually done anything yet but release a mere statement... So jumping to conclusions isn't right, either.

Draco
15-08-08, 05:26
The United States is still the single most powerful nation on Earth. Granted the combined might of everyone else would probably be the end of us, but that won't happen. Not anytime soon.

The world is only going to get more intertwined, and the rogue states will slowly but surely be pulled into the bankers' web.

Paul H
15-08-08, 07:22
Considering the path my country has taken these last 7 years I understand the hypocracy in the statement issued to USSR, but to not comment would be just as grevious, and I'm sure if a statement WASN'T made others would chime in at the U.S's smug silence.

Some people (mostly those in the media) would indeed react in that way, but many others (real people, not media people), from all over the world, would rejoice that at long last the US was appearing to change its ways and end its intolerable policy of sticking its unwelcome nose into everyone else’s affairs.

Paul H
15-08-08, 07:29
The world is only going to get more intertwined, and the rogue states will slowly but surely be pulled into the bankers' web.

That is why I find what has been happening in Russia in recent years so interesting. Since they took back their country from the Rothschild controlled oligarchs, they have made a major dent in the plans of the globalist bankers.

Cochrane
15-08-08, 08:14
What the...? Of course the US will comment on this situation. Their government would be doing it's job terribly wrong if they didn't (they still do, but that's an entirely different topic).

The US has a lot of power, and it is an ally of Georgia. Using that influence to secure peace in the region is not a bad idea, especially since putting US troops into Georgia has been explicitly ruled out.

The war in Iraq was and still is wrong. But the US remaining fully isolationist is just as wrong, possibly even wronger, because they are one of the few countries that is even close to being able to directly influence countries for the better if they want to.

For what it's worth, the US have shown uncommon restraint in this issue. They only asked Russia to stop attacking Georgian territory, yet never said anything about the right of Russia to be in South Ossetia.

Paul H
15-08-08, 08:41
For what it's worth, the US have shown uncommon restraint in this issue. They only asked Russia to stop attacking Georgian territory, yet never said anything about the right of Russia to be in South Ossetia.

They also said nothing in condemnation of their friend Saakashvili's murderous attack on the innocent civilians of South Ossetia, which was what started this whole conflict. It is that blatant bias, which we also see whenever Israel is involved in conflicts with its neighbours, that renders the US, under its present leadership, totally devoid of any credibility in respect of its statements on the rights & wrongs of conflicts around the world.

Muhammad
15-08-08, 08:59
The US is in a tight situation right now, because it didn't expect this scale of retaliation from Russia when Georgia took its military operations to South Ossetia and it did promise Georgia protection in the Security Council.

Drone
15-08-08, 09:24
scream until the war is over

Forwen
15-08-08, 15:56
As far as I know, Russia doesn't export anything to the USA.

Not sure what you're trying to say here...

1. There's no direct pipeline connecting Russia and America.
2. That doesn't mean America doesn't import oil from Russia, because it does, and the numbers are rising (http://tonto.eia.doe.gov/dnav/pet/pet_move_impcus_a2_nus_ep00_im0_mbbl_m.htm) (btw whoa, I didn't know Venezuelan imports where this big?). It gets shipped to ports where it departs on oil tankers. Pipelines are only a stage of the journey, although not any less important.

But if I understand you right then that's beside the point anyway...

I wasn't talking about Russian pipelines - quite the contrary, I meant the pipelines transporting a cheaper-than-Russian oil leading from Caspian Sea that are beyond the control of Russia and therefore present a threat to Russia's most powerful political and economical leverage that is energy blackmail (recently exercised on Ukraine and Czech Republic for example). Baku-Ceyhan, the second longest pipeline in the world is one of them.

I've read an interesting point recently that I agree with completely, that Russia's invasion of Georgia had one more goal - to scare off potential investors in the region. As far as I know, BP's who's been investing in Caucasus is already having second thoughts.

hookups
15-08-08, 18:04
*There will be no US troops in Georgia.*

You can't just turn a blind eye to situations like this. The US is taking a humanitarian role in this one. Others don't see it that way and start to jumping to conclusions. <-that has to stop.