PDA

View Full Version : Question about Gaming Colledge


tranniversary119
24-08-08, 19:20
Well I'm looking into the development of video games well to be a designer and all that good stuff :ton: But I was curious to see if there was anybody on TRF who actually went to college for it and how far they got with it. I'm really serious about it and I'd love to go to college for this and hopefully get a job somewhere developing video games. So any Game Designers here? I'm still in High School but hey it doesn't hurt to plan ahead :wve:

trXD
24-08-08, 19:23
I know somebody who knows somebody that apparently goes here (http://www.qantm.co.uk/news/index.php).

Edit: sorry thats not much help but i thought i should post it just incase.

stranger1992
24-08-08, 19:26
I start an games development course in 10 days:

E-media and games development.

What would you like to know?

tranniversary119
24-08-08, 20:02
I start an games development course in 10 days:

E-media and games development.

What would you like to know?

Yeah :wve: and thanks for the info trxd ;)

TRfan23
24-08-08, 20:06
Ah something I've wanted to ask myself!
To me it sounds like a stupid question but...

I want get into Game Programing, do they just call it Game Programming. Or is that related to Game Design Catagory?

Archetype
24-08-08, 20:16
its just programming.


Art, design, Engineering.


And yes, I'm currently studying Games development and design.

Don't know where they got the Design part from since it's just C++ programming and Direct X 9.0 stuff :/

Endow
24-08-08, 20:26
.

stranger1992
24-08-08, 20:30
http://www.trle.net/reviewsearch/levelfeatures.php?lid=1839

^

like I did. Reason why i did that level was to get experiance of the process. I got into college with it so its pretty special for me.
To play, download and extract. Then click on tomb4.exe and enjoy.

L.C
24-08-08, 20:32
Ah something I've wanted to ask myself!
To me it sounds like a stupid question but...

I want get into Game Programing, do they just call it Game Programming. Or is that related to Game Design Catagory?
If I'm not mistaken, there might be a campus in Rochester that does a course. I think it might be with Greenwich Uni. I'm not 100% sure, so it's best you check first :)

Elysia
24-08-08, 20:33
Game dev college courses are still too young. The great majority (there might be one or two) of game designers haven't got a "game design" diploma. They work their way up the food chain by doing all sort of game dev related stuff.

You should read this : http://www.sloperama.com/advice.html

You need to figure out what you really want to do in terms of game development because games these days are big projects that involve dozens of people. All of them have different backgrounds : if you want to do programming you take a Computer Science degree, if you want to be a concept artist you need to go to Art school, etc etc

Game design in itself is a bit of a mixture of things - you need to have background in a variety of different things related to games. The best way to do that is to start making games on your own. That's right, by yourself using the tools at your disposal. Or doing mods.

Anyway, if you are serious about it's definitely not too early to think about it - entering the game industry is very hard. You should be well prepared, build a portfolio and enroll in a course that you like, in a area that you are interested in.There are people with degrees in Philosophy that ended up working as game designers. It's a matter of hard work.

Best of luck and be sure to read the link I posted through and through. It's information is really invaluable :)
Endow has the right of it! Getting into the gaming industry is hard work - you really need to be a specialist in your field (and a bloody good one who is willing to start out as the equivalent of the tea boy and work their way up), and most people do that by studying for proper computer science / engineering degrees first that, I am afraid, have nothing to do with games. My husband is a computer engineer and knows a couple of people trying to get into the games industry, and it is very, very competitive - it isn't just a case of learning a couple of programming languages and having an eye for design - these guys have got good degrees and masters degrees in Computer Engineering and they are still finding it hard to get their foot in the door.

TRfan23
24-08-08, 20:51
If I'm not mistaken, there might be a campus in Rochester that does a course. I think it might be with Greenwich Uni. I'm not 100% sure, so it's best you check first :)

Do you have to go to a Uni then to do Game Programming?

What about Colledge? I just don't know an awful lot about where to go and what do I need etc?

Do you recon I could go to colledge first then Uni after? :confused:


Woopsie, just read Endow's post lol.

stranger1992
24-08-08, 20:53
thats the way it generally is anyway. A-levels then Uni.

Study maths! Once your done, study more. After that, eat a sandwhich. Following that, do maths.

See my point?

Your only 14, just concentrate on the present untill at least really..January ect.

TRfan23
24-08-08, 20:54
thats the way it generally is anyway. A-levels then Uni.

Study maths! Once your done, study more. After that, eat a sandwhich. Following that, do maths.

See my point?

Your only 15, just concentrate on the present untill at least really..January ect.

Corrected! :D Oh and for A level don't you need to study more then one subject? Apparently you can't just study one, apart from at colledge?

Endow has the right of it! Getting into the gaming industry is hard work - you really need to be a specialist in your field (and a bloody good one who is willing to start out as the equivalent of the tea boy and work their way up), and most people do that by studying for proper computer science / engineering degrees first that, I am afraid, have nothing to do with games. My husband is a computer engineer and knows a couple of people trying to get into the games industry, and it is very, very competitive - it isn't just a case of learning a couple of programming languages and having an eye for design - these guys have got good degrees and masters degrees in Computer Engineering and they are still finding it hard to get their foot in the door.

:eek:

L.C
24-08-08, 20:59
Do you have to go to a Uni then to do Game Programming?

What about Colledge? I just don't know an awful lot about where to go and what do I need etc?

Do you recon I could go to colledge first then Uni after? :confused:


Woopsie, just read Endow's post lol.
Yep, that is a very good post. I was just pointing out that there may be a course sort of in your area :)

TRfan23
24-08-08, 21:03
and I'm heading into yr 11 oooo GCSE's scary!

But really there are tougher things in life then GCSE's! - They are the start of leading you to a job, but need some more pushing to do!

Endow
24-08-08, 21:09
.

TRfan23
24-08-08, 21:15
Basically degrees don't mean much. This is an artistic meaning in more ways than one, after all. I'm taking Computer Engineering myself, but basically just as a safety net. I'm planning to start from the bottom of the pit - QA testing. You don't even need a degree to do that, but it's a good way to break in, arguably the easiest and it's a nice way to find out if you like it or not, or even if you are cut out for it or not.

What if your a person that doesn't have a lot of self-confidence? :o

VonCroy360
24-08-08, 21:17
I researched a bit about this some time ago and the best place for this kind of education seems to be the Abertay Dundee University. It is said they invest the most in their equipment and they have the longest tradition of this type of courses (I've heard many new game design courses have been known to close because of money troubles and lack of jobs afterwards). They're also one of the few who actually work with the industry - Sony and Activison seem to have taken part in the teaching as well and often offered internships etc.
And no, I'm not being paid to write this. :vlol:

Cochrane
24-08-08, 21:24
I'm not convinced that all those game design courses are truly a good idea at the moment. My fear is that they are too new and too specific to be truly useful. Of course, I could be completely wrong here, but I decided to take the safe route and am now studying to get a normal computer science degree (planning to get Master) instead. Apart from being well established, I learn everything I need to know for the programming side of games here, and I am not restricted to "the way it's done in games".

One thing I'd be very wary of is anything that claims to be mainly about game "design". That is an important area, sure, but many people who want to get into games seem unwilling to learn maths and programming (or arts, but I'm not familiar with that area at all) and then post on forums "I have this awesomely great idea, if you implement it I'll give you half the money!" One does not get into the industry by simply having ideas, you have to be able to implement them as well. That can be in code or in artwork, or following a design process working with people who know the other two, but it's always work.

Final note: I don't have the slightest clue about the art side as I suck at that, but if you want to get into video game programming, or generally anything in computer science, you have to love math. It's not enough to be "good enough" or have good marks but secretly hate it, computer science is all about applied maths and if you don't love that you will fail for sure.

Endow
24-08-08, 21:36
.

stranger1992
24-08-08, 21:45
We need Jaywalker to perhaps tell us something, or Keir :)