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Lemmie
31-08-08, 21:44
Hey guys! :wve:

I was wondering if someone with a knowledge of Japanese could help me out. When Japanese people address each other as 'example-san' is the example their given name or their surname? I would like to know as I am doing a short fanfic based in Japan and the Japanese characters talk amongst themselves and obviously have to address each other.

Basically, what is the -san suffix used for, what does it signify and when is it used. And also of course, is it the surname or the given name?

Thanks for your help! :)

Tombreaper
31-08-08, 21:52
Hey guys! :wve:

I was wondering if someone with a knowledge of Japanese could help me out. When Japanese people address each other as 'example-san' is the example their given name or their surname? I would like to know as I am doing a short fanfic based in Japan and the Japanese characters talk amongst themselves and obviously have to address each other.

Basically, what is the -san suffix used for, what does it signify and when is it used. And also of course, is it the surname or the given name?

Thanks for your help! :)


example-san is always the surname, that's what I know

ivannnnn
31-08-08, 21:53
Ex: Lemmie-san.

:)

toxicraider
31-08-08, 21:54
-- san is mr --/ mrs --
so it is surname, but in china, japan and korea the surname is said before the christian name, so

takamoto san

his name in english would be shogo takamoto, but in japanese it is takamoto shogo :)

Tombreaper
31-08-08, 21:57
Yes, like Harry Tombreaper: Tombreaper-san

Sarah Palin : Palin-san (because san is used for women as well as for men)

Lemmie
31-08-08, 21:59
See, the thing that confused me was the way that Lara addresses both Nishimura and Takamoto from Legend.

She calls Nishimura 'Nishimura-san' and Takamoto 'Takamoto-san'. Nishimura is her friend, so it might make sense that she would call him by his given name - however 'Toru' sounds more like a given name than Nishimura.

For Takamoto she might use his surname, because using his given name would be inappropriate given the fact that she's going to kill him just a bit.

However, both names are written in the same form - Shogo Takamoto and Toru Nishimura, making it difficult to understand which name is which!

toxicraider
31-08-08, 22:05
See, the thing that confused me was the way that Lara addresses both Nishimura and Takamoto from Legend.

She calls Nishimura 'Nishimura-san' and Takamoto 'Takamoto-san'. Nishimura is her friend, so it might make sense that she would call him by his given name - however 'Toru' sounds more like a given name than Nishimura.

For Takamoto she might use his surname, because using his given name would be inappropriate given the fact that she's going to kill him just a bit.

However, both names are written in the same form - Shogo Takamoto and Toru Nishimura, making it difficult to understand which name is which!

Ermm i'm not really sure about that, i think as lara is still trying to be polite to her host she would say nishimura-san, however the words 'you' and 'I' are generally avoided. Technically she could be very rude to takamoto by saying just takamoto, but she didn't :)
i think it's also rude to call somebody by their given name, unless you are in an informal context, but i think maybe a japanese person would be able to explain it better.

Lemmie
31-08-08, 22:09
Or maybe I'm worrying about it too much! :p I should just try to get the story done, and worry about these things when I edit it later.

However if anyone has a definitive answer I'd be glad if they would explain it to me! :D

Tombreaper
31-08-08, 22:10
Or maybe I'm worrying about it too much! :p I should just try to get the story done, and worry about these things when I edit it later.

However if anyone has a definitive answer I'd be glad if they would explain it to me! :D

Why not google it?

ivannnnn
31-08-08, 22:13
But what are the differences among -san,-chan,-kun?? :confused:

Lemmie
31-08-08, 22:13
Well, I checked wikipedia.org and it says it can be used in both surnames and given names. But that's wikipedia. As in the 'don't use wikipedia as a source because it might be wrong because anybody can use and edit wikipedia' way.

toxicraider
31-08-08, 22:17
But what are the differences among -san,-chan,-kun?? :confused:

chan is a term of endearment towards women and children,

kun is generally said to younger, or lower socially ranked people, it's not as polite as san but is better than just 1st name, i guess you could translate it as miss or master in informal senses.

Lara could call takamoto kun, but once again, i'm not sure she was planning on killing him as the first option.

kun is generally male, chan is more female though.

Hateshinai
31-08-08, 22:34
Putting -san after a Name also means respect :)
I'm Japanese :D

If you want me to, i'll give you more explications tomorrow :)

BtoFu
01-09-08, 09:35
more explications tomorrow :)

please do.

Lemmie
01-09-08, 09:37
@ Hateshinai - yes please. :)

Hateshinai
01-09-08, 16:44
Hi there !
So,

Name Order

In Japan, as it's already've been said, First Names and Last Names are written and told like LN FN, unlike in many other countries . My first name is Shirona and my last name is Asaku. Here in NY, i'm being called Shirona Asaku.
But in Japan, I'm being called Asaku Shirona.


Sama (San')

(San' is the abbreviation of Sama)
As I'm sure you're aware, respect is a very important thing around there.
People can feel offended with small things which seem stupid, but for them, they're not.

The suffix -San is been used to complete someone that you respect/should respect or older than you's LAST NAME or if he/she is your mate, his/her first name . You even have sometimes to use this suffix with your parents.
Okaha(Mother)-San ; Obaha(Father)-San

But I'm sure that, here, most of you hardly ever call their parents Mother or Father :ton: .

People younger than me that I don't know, reffer to me as Asaku-sama.
I reffer to my school director as Happuri-sama. And so on ... :D


Chan

Chan is the suffix used toward little girls, girls of the same age as you or women you may find attractive but with whom you're not very close.

I refer to my little sister as Haruka-chan.
She refers to me as Shirona-chan.
So do my male schoolmates.


Kun

Same thing than above but could also be used with boys, girls, attractive YOUNG MEN (once they've grown up, you have to use -San, even if they're pretty hot as hell :D) .

I refer to my older bro as Ryo-kun
So does he with me . (Shirona-kun)

BUT /!\ using -kun toward a girl can sometime be pretentious.




That's it I think, I'll maybe update it if some more info passes by my mind :)

BUT REMEMBER, that's how things are in MY DIALECT ! (which is pretty common :))


Shiro

toxicraider
01-09-08, 16:58
Hi there !
So,

Name Order

In Japan, as it's already've been said, First Names and Last Names are written and told like LN FN, unlike in many other countries . My first name is Shirona and my last name is Asaku. Here in NY, i'm being called Shirona Asaku.
But in Japan, I'm being called Asaku Shirona.


Sama (San')

(San' is the abbreviation of Sama)
As I'm sure you're aware, respect is a very important thing around there.
People can feel offended with small things which seem stupid, but for them, they're not.

The suffix -San is been used to complete someone that you respect/should respect or older than you's LAST NAME or if he/she is your mate, his/her first name . You even have sometimes to use this suffix with your parents.
Okaha(Mother)-San ; Obaha(Father)-San

But I'm sure that, here, most of you hardly ever call their parents Mother or Father :ton: .

People younger than me that I don't know, reffer to me as Asaku-sama.
I reffer to my school director as Happuri-sama. And so on ... :D


Chan

Chan is the suffix used toward little girls, girls of the same age as you or women you may find attractive but with whom you're not very close.

I refer to my little sister as Haruka-chan.
She refers to me as Shirona-chan.
So do my male schoolmates.


Kun

Same thing than above but could also be used with boys, girls, attractive YOUNG MEN (once they've grown up, you have to use -San, even if they're pretty hot as hell :D) .

I refer to my older bro as Ryo-kun
So does he with me . (Shirona-kun)

BUT /!\ using -kun toward a girl can sometime be pretentious.




That's it I think, I'll maybe update it if some more info passes by my mind :)

BUT REMEMBER, that's how things are in MY DIALECT ! (which is pretty common :))


Shiro

cool thanks :)

about the parents thingy, what does baha and kaha mean?
i read you would call your own parents chichi and haha, or other peoples otousan and okasan, also that you can call your own parents that for respect.

also when do you use kimi? because i read it's for male people and not polite but i've heard it for girls too.

Lemmie
01-09-08, 18:24
Excellent, Hateshinai that clears everything up. Thanks so much! :tmb:

Hateshinai
01-09-08, 19:22
Okahasan & Okaasan or Oka'san are the same things :P just different dialects .
Obahasan & Obaasan or oba'san or otousan are the same things too :ton:

Chichi and Haha stand for mom and dad (but I never used them)

Kimi means you but is actually used to refer to your love interest or maybe your best friend.

toxicraider
01-09-08, 19:24
Okahasan & Okaasan or Oka'san are the same things :P just different dialects .
Obahasan & Obaasan or oba'san or otousan are the same things too :ton:

Chichi and Haha stand for mom and dad (but I never used them)

Kimi means you but is actually used to refer to your love interest or maybe your best friend.

thanks

are kaha and ka
and baha and tou written in the same way?

TombRaiderCool
01-09-08, 19:52
I have learned Japanese for a few years now, and consider it my second language.
So a little bit about San:
In Japanese, San (さん, San) is the most common honorific and is a title of respect. It is used for the surnames or given names of both males and females. Although in translation san is usually rendered as a common courtesy title like “Mr.” or “Ms.”, unlike these it is never used in self-reference. Using san to refer to oneself makes one appear childish or incredibly vain.

San may also be used in combination with nouns describing the addressee or referent other than the person's name; for example, a bookseller might be addressed or referred to as honya-san ("bookseller" + san) and a butcher, as nikuya-san ("butcher" + san).

San is also used when talking about companies and other similar entities. For example, the offices or shop of a company called Kojima Denki might be referred to as "Kojima Denki-san" by another nearby company. This may be seen on the small maps often used in phone books and business cards in Japan, where the names of surrounding companies are written using san.

Although, strictly speaking, not an honorific title in this usage, san can also be attached to the names of animals or even food products. For example, a pet rabbit might be called usagi-san, and fish used for cooking can be referred to as sakana-san. Both uses would be considered feminine and/or childish (akin to "Mr. Rabbit" in English) and would be avoided in polite speech.

In western Japan (Kansai), particularly in the Kyoto area, Han (はん, Han) is used instead of san.

Online, Japanese gamers will often add a numeral 3 after another player's name to denote 'san', e.g., yoshimitsu3 equates to yoshimitsu-san, as the number three in Japanese is pronounced "san".

petujaymz
15-09-08, 13:06
Anyone bored enough to translate this for me?

http://www.capcom.co.jp/sf4/cs_stories.html

:wve:

Angelx14
15-09-08, 13:24
^Try translator.
Hey guys! :wve:

I was wondering if someone with a knowledge of Japanese could help me out. When Japanese people address each other as 'example-san' is the example their given name or their surname? I would like to know as I am doing a short fanfic based in Japan and the Japanese characters talk amongst themselves and obviously have to address each other.

Basically, what is the -san suffix used for, what does it signify and when is it used. And also of course, is it the surname or the given name?

Thanks for your help! :)

It's the formal use, like for Mr, Mrs.

Kobayashi-san (Mr Kobayashi)

Oh jeez, old thread. Sorry bout that.

petujaymz
15-09-08, 13:42
Anyone bored enough to translate this for me?

http://www.capcom.co.jp/sf4/cs_stories.html

:wve:

^Try translator.



Here's the result using Google's translation tool...

http://translate.google.com/translate?u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.capcom.co.jp%2Fsf4%2F cs_stories.html&sl=ja&tl=en&hl=en&ie=UTF-8

LOL

:wve: