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Tombcool
30-09-08, 00:11
I really really wanted to stop using other people's photos for my photo manipulations, and actually start using my own. The thing is, I would need a really good camera if I wanted to do stuff in high resolution (and in good quality). Any good recommendations?

My budget is from $1000-1500. :)

I have also really wanted to do all the photographs in HDR, which I know has nothing really to do with the camera, just the merging of different exposures, but it would be cool if a photographer here explained how to merge the photos. :D

Mr.Burns
30-09-08, 00:50
Personally, I'm a Nikon fan. For your price range, I'd suggest a D200. Not as nice as the D300 but it's still a damn good camera. If you're a Canon fan, I'd wait for Sam Reeves to chime in, that's his speciality. As for HDR, I've tried playing around with it but I never really liked the results (doesn't feel right to me). Assuming you have CS2 or 3 (photoshop), they have HDR capabilities. HDR Tutorial (http://www.luminous-landscape.com/tutorials/hdr.shtml). This should give you an introduction to HDR through CS2.

TheWhiteStone
30-09-08, 02:19
There are alot of great cameras out there, you have to ask yourlself what your needs, as a photographer are. you may end up spending more money on a camera that you wont really need.

I own a Nikon D80, which was my first SLR camera. I'd recommend this camera (or one with similar specs) as a first SLR. its great for amatures and professional alike.

but the best advice that i can give you is, read as many reviews as possible
http://www.dpreview.com/

ps. http://www.flickr.com/cameras/ - you can use this to see the quality of other photographers photo's using different particular cameras!

hope this helps!

Punaxe
30-09-08, 10:07
You have to keep in mind that when buying a (digital) SLR you're not just buying a body; you'll also need one or more lenses to go with it. While the D200 Mr. Burns suggested is indeed a great camera, you'll spend almost your entire budget on the body alone. I would suggest taking a cheaper body, for example indeed the D80 (I'm a Nikon guy too :p), and throw in a couple of nice lenses from what you save.

Also, what sort of high-resolution application are you thinking of? Pretty much everything above 5MP should be good enough for that, which is pretty much every camera out there.

SamReeves
01-10-08, 23:10
I really really wanted to stop using other people's photos for my photo manipulations, and actually start using my own. The thing is, I would need a really good camera if I wanted to do stuff in high resolution (and in good quality). Any good recommendations?

My budget is from $1000-1500. :)

I have also really wanted to do all the photographs in HDR, which I know has nothing really to do with the camera, just the merging of different exposures, but it would be cool if a photographer here explained how to merge the photos. :D

I'd go look for a used Canon 20D, then use the balance to get yourself some lenses. You can probably get one at KEH Camera Brokers for under $500. Don't know what to tell you about focal lengths since I am unsure what subject matter you are doing.

Tombcool
04-10-08, 20:24
Thanks a bunch guys, but I am indeed a Canon fan. :ton:

I think mostly what i'll be photographing is scenery and (female) models. All this talk about "focal lengths" and stuff is really confusing, I really don't know anything about (SLR) cameras, lol. :p

I'll give an example of exactly what I want all my photos to look like before I manipulate them:
http://zardo.deviantart.com/art/Heat-heart-89753752

or this...
http://geckokid.deviantart.com/art/Over-the-Top-89899601

If I have to wait a little longer to save up more money to get a camera and lenses to achieve those effects, then I will do so. :D

I am also looking for resolutions of nothing less than 3000 pixels.

Punaxe
04-10-08, 22:48
Ah, hm, I'm fairly certain that both of those shots were actually not coming straight out of the camera, but use a technique called HDR (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High_dynamic_range_imaging) where multiple photos of multiple different exposures are merged together. You can't really say much about the camera based on those shots.

You can tell though that they've been shot with a pretty short focal length. That basically means that you can fit a whole lot on the picture, which is very useful for some shots but less useful for model photography. For model photography, you may want to look at lenses that are a bit more "zoomed in", and can separate the model from the background by making the background very blurry (achieved by a wide aperture).

However that still doesn't say anything about the actual camera, since you can change lenses all you want. If you don't know anything, why are you a Canon fan by the way? :p
A good site to check for cameras is Digital Photography Review (http://dpreview.com/). You could check the Buying Guide for example. You apparently want more than 8 MP, but that's pretty standard for dSLRs - some mobile phones already have that :p

Tombcool
05-10-08, 00:59
lol, all the digital cameras i've bought before were Canons, thats why. :p I meant, SLR camera, don't know anything about them, fixed my post.

Thanks for advice btw! :)

Apparently, both of those shots had focal lengths of 10-22 mm? Which I don't have any idea to what that means.

I'll go research through that site, thanks a bunch. :jmp:

Punaxe
05-10-08, 01:41
A shot can have only one focal length, but a lens can have a range of focal lengths (zooming in and out). The guy from the first picture mentions which lens he used (a 10-22mm indeed) but we don't know exactly at what length he shot, and at the second picture it gives some details saying it was at 18mm exactly.

Tamron has some tools online to see about focal lengths and depth of field:
As you can see from the Focal Length Comparison Tool (http://www.tamron.com/lenses/learning_center/tools/focal-length-comparison.php), a longer focal length basically just zooms in.
But as the Depth of Field Comparison (http://www.tamron.com/lenses/learning_center/tools/depth-of-field-comparison.php) shows, there are also some other effects when you keep the subject of the same relative size by zooming in and stepping further backwards yourself. This tool also shows the influence of the used aperture.

And uh, do you mean film SLR or digital SLR? I've been assuming digital... If you spend the budget you have on a Canon digital SLR body and one or two lenses I'm pretty sure you can't end up with bad equipment, but yeah I don't know much about Canon.