PDA

View Full Version : A Good Book?


Soma Holiday
26-11-08, 13:50
I don't have a lot of reading experience as in I hardly ever read, but I really want to since I love to write.

Can anyone suggest a good book for me? I like the Twilight Series and anything Science Fiction, just nothing overly complicated like Lord of the Rings, just something fun and enjoyable for someone who only reads casually. Anything with space or vampires, but nothing too cheesy. I dunno, I am just having a hard time since it usually takes me a while to really get into books. :o

I tried going online to see some suggestions, but non of them seemed very interesting...anyone love a book that they think I might like. :)

tlr online
26-11-08, 13:51
1984 by Goerge Orwell.
Brave New World by Aldous Huxley
The Beach by Alex Garland.

Have fun!

oocladableeblah
26-11-08, 13:56
Buffy the Vampire Slayer are good.
2001 Space Oddysey
There is the ever classic book Dracula
idk of any vampire/space books besides those.

Quasimodo
26-11-08, 13:59
Life of Pi by Yann Martel
Hearts in Atlantis by Stephen King
and anything by Chuck Palahnuik makes for an interesting read.

Janezz
26-11-08, 14:01
Darren Shan's books - Darren shan wrote them and the seriers name are Saga of Darren Shan. He wrote serier about demons, I donšt remember it name now :P
But Darren Shan serier you can found there: http://www.darrenshan.com/vampires/books/index.html

Keir_Eidos
26-11-08, 14:01
Life of Pi by Yann Martel


*jumps up and down* I love that book... especially the first half.


I will now wheel out my stock response to good book threads - but beware, it's not light or fun, but it is profound. There is one book I recommend every time when asked, well technically it’s two books:

'If This is a Man' and 'The Truce' by Primo Levi. Even thinking about them gives me shivers.

For those that don't know, Primo Levi was a young, academic Jewish man living in Italy at the start of World War II. The first book documents his time and subsequent freakishly lucky survival in Auschwitz. The account is delivered objectively without anger or emotion (this came in his later books before his suicide). It's just an honest account of what it was like and it’s far and away the most thought provoking book I've ever read. The smallest observations from his time there will hit you like a punch in the face.

The second book, although not as harrowing is also a great read and documents his arduous (and extremely drawn-out) journey back home (via Russia) after the war.

With in the first few pages of ‘If This is a Man’, Levi finds himself with a hundred other Jewish men in a warehouse, confused, stripped naked, cold, dehydrated from days of transport, staring at a dripping tap he can’t drink from, being shouted at in a language he doesn’t understand. It rapidly gets more horrific from there on in. However, his descriptions of how people survived daily are full of charm and observations about the resourcefulness of human character.

I could talk your ears off about that book.

john_york
26-11-08, 14:06
I really liked The Gum Thief by Douglas Coupland. Very strange idea for a book, but fascinating to read.

Soma Holiday
26-11-08, 14:10
Thanks for the suggestions...now to amazon.com them all and pick the one that looks the best.

I love Brave New World...and 1984 looks promising. I've tried reading Dracula and failed, and 2001 the movie I absolutely hate lol...now to filter through the rest.

Thanks guys.

touchthesky
26-11-08, 15:15
Lord Of The Flies-William Golding.

I heard so many mixed reviews, so decided to pick it up myself.

Loved it!

Might read it again after re-reading New Moon, actually.

Also, King is an amazing writer. If you're not wanting over-complicated I wouldn't go with Hearts In Atlantis, I'd head more toward books such as Cell, Pet Semetary and Geralds Game (although thats a bit of a debater in the old complicated thing.)

Big E
26-11-08, 15:35
Thanks for the suggestions...now to amazon.com them all and pick the one that looks the best.

I love Brave New World...and 1984 looks promising. I've tried reading Dracula and failed, and 2001 the movie I absolutely hate lol...now to filter through the rest.

Thanks guys.

If your liked Brave New World, you should definitely read 1984, as the two books have often been said to be converse visions of a future totalitarian society.

And, if you liked Brave New World, I also recommend Aldous Huxley's "Brave New World Revisited", which is a short collection of essays he wrote about thirty years after Brave New World was published and in which he argues that the totalitarian society he predicted was realizing itself sooner than he thought it would

If, on the other hand, you like well written humour, I really enjoyed a book called "The Master and the Margarita" by Bulgakov (I think). Not any easy read per se, but a great premise (the Devil comes to Moscow with his entourage and wreaks havoc). Absurdly funny.

And, if you enjoy absurd humour, you can't go wrong with Kurt Vonnegut.

tlr online
26-11-08, 15:36
And, if you liked Brave New World, I also recommend Aldous Huxley's "Brave New World Revisited", which is a short collection of essays he wrote about thirty years after Brave New World was published and in which he argues that the totalitarian society he predicted was realizing itself sooner than he thought it would.

I didn't know about this.

*scuttles off to buy it online*

Big E
26-11-08, 15:41
I didn't know about this.

*scuttles off to buy it online*

You should buy it, but it's not fiction like Brave New World, rather, it discusses topics such a brainwashing, mob mentality, chemical persuasions, etc., while using Hitler and Nazi Germany as its primary example.

Also, if you enjoy this type of reading (i.e. "social commentary", for lack of a better term), I also highly recommend Neil Postman's writings, particularly "Amusing Ourselves To Death", "The Disappearance of Childhood" and "The End of Education". Very thought provoking and, fortunately, easy to read.

tlr online
26-11-08, 15:55
You should buy it, but it's not fiction like Brave New World, rather, it discusses topics such a brainwashing, mob mentality, chemical persuasions, etc., while using Hitler and Nazi Germany as its primary example.

Also, if you enjoy this type of reading (i.e. "social commentary", for lack of a better term), I also highly recommend Neil Postman's writings, particularly "Amusing Ourselves To Death", "The Disappearance of Childhood" and "The End of Education". Very thought provoking and, fortunately, easy to read.

More food for thought here (http://www.zeitgeistmovie.com/).

Big E
26-11-08, 16:05
More food for thought here (http://www.zeitgeistmovie.com/).

I clicked the link, but the clip is not loading properly (possible server issues). How about a brief synopsis, if you don't mind?

Tombcool
26-11-08, 16:13
Brave New World by Aldous Huxley



Seconded!! :D So much great symbolism in that book.

I would also recommend The Wars by Timothy Findley! :)

Bowie
26-11-08, 16:29
"And Then There Were None," by Agatha Christie.

Elmer
26-11-08, 16:46
Congratulations! Your 1000 post:jmp:^

The Wheel of Time

By Robert Jordan:)

Bowie
26-11-08, 16:56
Congratulations! Your 1000 post:jmp:^
Haha WOW I had no idea... shows you how much I pay attention to post counts and spamming up the count etc :p

I know this is O/T but better this than starting a new thread about it LMAO. Here's a little commemorative screenie I grabbed!! :D:D

http://img266.imageshack.us/img266/1272/trf1000postsbu1.png

Elmer
26-11-08, 17:01
Haha WOW I had no idea... shows you how much I pay attention to post counts and spamming up the count etc :p

I know this is O/T but better this than starting a new thread about it LMAO. Here's a little commemorative screenie I grabbed!! :D:D

http://img266.imageshack.us/img266/1272/trf1000postsbu1.png

Cool! *Saves picture*


'What dreams may come' is also a great book:)
I only forgot who the author is:(

Nannonxyay
26-11-08, 17:14
Lord Of The Flies-William Golding.

I heard so many mixed reviews, so decided to pick it up myself.

Loved it!

Might read it again after re-reading New Moon, actually.

Also, King is an amazing writer. If you're not wanting over-complicated I wouldn't go with Hearts In Atlantis, I'd head more toward books such as Cell, Pet Semetary and Geralds Game (although thats a bit of a debater in the old complicated thing.)

I read Lord Of The Flies in English. Some of it was rather good. :tmb: Besides the sexual innuendo...

bivvy
26-11-08, 17:25
Animal Farm, by George Orwell. I love this story and it's message. You shouldn't judge the book by it's title. This is no kiddie book. ;)
Letters to George, by Helen Simpson. A crude and clever short fic about a 15-year old and her extreme immaturity.

Kerrigan
26-11-08, 17:26
Since "Brave New World" and "1984" were mentioned, I remembered "We" by Evgheni Zamiatin.It has the same theme, the depiction of a dystopia, and it precedes the two.I liked it a lot, it's one of my favourites.

You could also try "The Old Man and the Sea" by Ernest Hemingway.It's very short and touching.

Another one that I liked a lot was "The Picture of Dorian Grey" by Oscar Wilde.

If you like science-fiction, you can start by reading the "Foundation" series by Asimov.

Candee Sparks
26-11-08, 17:30
Lord Of The Flies-William Golding.

I heard so many mixed reviews, so decided to pick it up myself.

Loved it!



My most favorite book! In fact, just last Friday I was supposed to go to a field trip to go see the play version of it on my local Syracuse Stage but I stayed home because I couldn't stand to see a bunch of 11 and 12 year old's completely ruin and defile my favorite book.

If anyone mentions anything having to do with Twilight, there will be hell to pay :smk:

tlr online
26-11-08, 17:39
I clicked the link, but the clip is not loading properly (possible server issues). How about a brief synopsis, if you don't mind?

'Zeitgeist, The Movie' and 'Zeitgeist: Addendum' were created as Not-for-Profit expressions to communicate what the author felt were highly important social understandings which most humans are generally not aware of. The first film focuses on suppressed historical & modern information about currently dominant social institutions, while also exploring what could be in store for humanity if the power structures at large continue their patterns of self-interest, corruption, and consolidation.

The second film, Zeitgeist: Addendum, attempts to locate the root causes of this pervasive social corruption, while offering a solution. This solution is not
based on politics, morality, laws, or any other "establishment" notions of human affairs, but rather on a modern, non-superstitious based understanding of what we are and how we align with nature, to which we are a part. The work advocates a new social system which is updated to present day knowledge, highly influenced by the life long work of Jacque Fresco and The Venus Project. - Source (http://www.zeitgeistmovie.com/statement.htm)

You can watch it online here (http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=7065205277695921912&ei=6pctSerWH53EiQKhw6S0Aw&q=zeitgeist).

Soma Holiday
26-11-08, 17:51
^ Seen them and I highly recommend them. The Zeitgeist films are good eye-openers for people with and without opinions on the subject. I totally support their cause.


I have Lord of the Flies but I've never read it. I got it from my school lubrary several years ago. I also read animal farm in school and I thought it was a cool premise.

Alright! I'm gonna order some of these. I got a nice 40% off coupon at Barnes and Noble, so hopefully I'll get into them and start reading more and learning to enjoy it

Thanx again everyone.

jackles
26-11-08, 17:55
If we are talking Stephen King, his best novel is The Stand. Just don't read it if you have the flu!

Geck-o-Lizard
26-11-08, 18:02
You should read the First Law trilogy by Joe Abercrombie. They're absolutely brilliant. It's fantasy with equal parts humour, parody and seriousness. The main characters include a barbarian with a heart of gold, a crippled torturer, a spoilt-rotten aristocrat, and a very sneaky wizard. The writing flows incredibly well - you sit down to read and before you know it you're halfway through. :D
The Blade Itself (http://www.amazon.co.uk/Blade-Itself-First-Book-Gollancz/dp/0575077867/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1227725860&sr=8-2)
Before They Are Hanged (http://www.amazon.co.uk/Before-They-Are-Hanged-Gollancz/dp/0575077883/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1227725902&sr=1-3)
Last Argument of Kings (http://www.amazon.co.uk/Last-Argument-Kings-First-Gollancz/dp/0575084162/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1227725932&sr=1-2)

Ampersand
26-11-08, 18:02
I loved King's The Shining, but I think everyone alive has read it already. D:

edit// Good choice Geck! I really enjoyed that trilogy, but it doesn't seem too well-known. :c

Geck-o-Lizard
26-11-08, 18:07
He's working on a new trilogy btw! The first book is called "Best Served Cold" and it should be out in June next year. He says it's set in the same universe as the First Law, but follows a Styrian mercenary instead. Can't bloody wait. :)
http://www.joeabercrombie.com/news.htm
Check out that cover. *drool*

Candee Sparks
26-11-08, 18:08
I loved King's The Shining, but I think everyone alive has read it already. D:

Just got done re-reading it yesterday. REDRUM. ;)

touchthesky
26-11-08, 18:45
My most favorite book! In fact, just last Friday I was supposed to go to a field trip to go see the play version of it on my local Syracuse Stage but I stayed home because I couldn't stand to see a bunch of 11 and 12 year old's completely ruin and defile my favorite book.

If anyone mentions anything having to do with Twilight, there will be hell to pay :smk:

I'd quite like to see it onstage! I have one of the movies (the newest I believe..orange cover). Not really watched it though.

I've heard that The Stand makes you sneeze lol!

Candee Sparks
26-11-08, 18:58
I'd quite like to see it onstage! I have one of the movies (the newest I believe..orange cover). Not really watched it though.



Trust me, the play was an epic failure to the point where it's going to be closed soon, my friend recorded it and I watched it. And don't get me started on that piece of crap 90's remake. If you really love that book, you will feel disgusted and repulsed at what they did in that movie.

If you want a very accurate film version, then you should watch the 60's verion but I can't find it anywhere. It's older, but at least you'll see it's Lord of the Flies.

jackles
26-11-08, 19:01
They have the 1963 version of Lord of the Flies on play.com for £5.00 so I guess it is still avaliable to purchase.

MoonSword
26-11-08, 21:32
The Farseer Trilogy, from Robin Hobb. Takes time to read the whole story, but captivating.

Tombreaper
26-11-08, 22:32
Jack Vance has some really cool titles.

Most of them are Sci-Fi, but the Lyonesse Trilogy is fantasy.
It's ways cool, and, in Jack Vance style, easy to read :)

Necromanser
27-11-08, 03:19
If you're into horror then you might want to read H.P Lovecraft's Chtulhu Mythos.It's available for free(legally) here-

http://manybooks.net/titles/lovecrafthother06cthulhu.html

You might also want to read Dune by Frank Herbert if you're into Sci-Fi.And you can also read the Amber Chronicles if you're not put off by the ammount of books you will have to read to finish them.

Indiana Croft
27-11-08, 04:05
Its not really a book, but you should read Batman:Hush. Its really good and based on the kind of genres you like, I think you could easily get into this. It would require some familiarity with the characters, though:o

EmeraldFields
27-11-08, 06:02
Hmm,

I know you said that you liked Sci-Fi, but I'll list you some books that I enjoy.

1. A White Bird Flying by: Bess Streeter Aldrich
2. My Life So Far by: Jane Fonda
3. A Great and Terrible Beauty by: Libba Bray

That's all for now. Hope you find what you're looking for.:)

Ampersand
27-11-08, 09:25
The Farseer Trilogy, from Robin Hobb. Takes time to read the whole story, but captivating.

Ahh, I second this. Superb character-driven fantasy. Er, I cried twice reading the first book. D:

rowanlim
27-11-08, 18:50
Can anyone suggest a good book for me? I like the Twilight Series and anything Science Fiction, just nothing overly complicated like Lord of the Rings, just something fun and enjoyable for someone who only reads casually. Anything with space or vampires, but nothing too cheesy. I dunno, I am just having a hard time since it usually takes me a while to really get into books. :o

I tried going online to see some suggestions, but non of them seemed very interesting...anyone love a book that they think I might like. :)

I'd recommend the Interview with the Vampire by Anne Rice. It's really good, read on the other sequels to that book (the Vampire Chronicles) & you'll get a fantastic read :tmb: