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View Full Version : If you are in the military, or a vet, sound off


Solice
12-12-08, 05:54
I was in the US Air Force and worked as an analyst. I got out as a Staff Sergeant after I finished my degree. How about you?

I miss the Blue. :(

Lara's Backpack
12-12-08, 09:31
Im not in the military, nor do I plan on joining it :tmb:

Both my parents were in Army Intelligence together, they met when they both posted to the same base.

(LOLing at the banner ad im getting in this topic, "Gay Military Dating")

Nefertiti_89
12-12-08, 09:39
LOL omg I got that banner too!

My grandfather was a war vet and he made all of his children and grandchildren promise him in writing that we would never join the military.

He said he wouldnt wish the things he saw on his worst enemy - he was a soldier in WWII and worked in a hospital camp as a consellor in Vietnam and it scarred him for life...poor guy couldnt even watch M*A*S*H without getting upset and that was a comedy :(.

Armies are for defending your land, on your land, not for invading others and attacking without first exploring more socially and economically sensible avenues.

MiCkiZ88
12-12-08, 10:13
Ugh.. this thread just reminded me that I would have to go to the army next June/July.. But if I'm lucky, I wont have to. I'm moving abroad within just 6 days. Would suck big time if I would have to come back here to serve 6 months in the army. :(

I need to contact them asap.

tomkat
12-12-08, 11:24
Ugh.. this thread just reminded me that I would have to go to the army next June/July.. But if I'm lucky, I wont have to. I'm moving abroad within just 6 days. Would suck big time if I would have to come back here to serve 6 months in the army. :(

I need to contact them asap.

Are you forced to go?
That would be horrible.

As for me, Id never EVER join. I wouldn't give my life for this country, it doesnt do anything to help me or the ones I love, they only take it all away.

Librarian
12-12-08, 11:37
Should I ever get in to nursing (a very real possibility at the moment) I'll probably join the military. Not only would they pay for my education, I'd come out of it with some sorely needed discipline and hopefully having done some good in the world.

One of my grandfathers fought at Kokoda in WWII, he passed away a few years ago. My other grandad fought in Malaysia during the 'Emergency' in the 50's, he'd kill me if I joined the army, lol.

CroftScionGuard
12-12-08, 11:37
Are you forced to go?
That would be horrible.
Here some years ago, young males were forced to go, now we're nomore, unless we fail to go to the day of national defense. I went in that day and I choose to not go.

Doby
12-12-08, 12:28
I'm still 16 but I want to go to the Naval Academy.

Sedge
12-12-08, 12:51
Are you forced to go?
That would be horrible.
Military service is compulsory for all men (there are some exceptions though, of course) in Finland, yes. Civilian service is an option as well, particularly for anti-militarists and pacifists who object to military service, but if you totally refuse to both you basically go to jail..

MiCkiZ88
12-12-08, 12:53
Military service is compulsory for all men (there are some exceptions though, of course) in Finland, yes. Civilian service is an option as well, particularly for anti-militarists and pacifists who object to military service, but if you totally refuse to both you basically go to jail..Do you know anything if those who have moved (or are going to move) abroad, will have to return back to Finland to serve?

I really dont want either, but I sure as hell dont want to go to jail either. Meh..

rowanlim
12-12-08, 13:00
One of my grandfathers fought at Kokoda in WWII, he passed away a few years ago. My other grandad fought in Malaysia during the 'Emergency' in the 50's, he'd kill me if I joined the army, lol.

I'd to ask, was he fighting against the communists? If so, thanks a lot :hug: :tmb:

The army recruits people pretty much on a voluntary basis. They have the National Service, where they randomly pick 17 yr olds to undergo basic training & do community service etc. My sister got selected, she'll go next yr for 3 months.

I know I sure as hell ain't built for military stuff ;)

Sedge
12-12-08, 13:47
Do you know anything if those who have moved (or are going to move) abroad, will have to return back to Finland to serve?

I really dont want either, but I sure as hell dont want to go to jail either. Meh..
I'm afraid you do.. _ From what I have heard, you'd most probably be wanted by the police if you didn't go once you were called, and depending on the country your living in at the time they may or may not have to convey you (it has something to do with the.. uh.. contract between the countries, or something? I'm not sure about this part..).. Agh, it's complex, but please don't take what I say for real as this is just how I've been told before, and I could have well misunderstood! IMO you just ought to contact them, as you said, as soon as possible.

All the best. :hug:

MiCkiZ88
12-12-08, 13:52
I'm afraid you do.. _ From what I have heard, you'd most probably be wanted by the police if you didn't go once you were called, and depending on the country your living in at the time they may or may not have to convey you (it has something to do with the.. uh.. contract between the countries, or something? I'm not sure about this part..).. Agh, it's complex, but please don't take what I say for real as this is just how I've been told before, and I could have well misunderstood! IMO you just ought to contact them, as you said, as soon as possible.

All the best. :hug:
Well I'll contact them on monday. I'm just afraid of me being stopped at the airport or something since I have an one way ticket. Blegh. But I still have like 6- 7 months left, so why should I be stopped?

Oh well. I did read something about citizens with two nationalities not having to do it anymore. I REALLY HOPE NOT!

Sir Croft
12-12-08, 15:06
Where I live we're forced to join the army, although they usually don't get many men, only if you REALLY want to join, most of the ones that apply for joining don't make their way to the army, though.

Mad Tony
12-12-08, 16:48
I don't plan to serve in the military. However, my big brother is in the Royal Navy. He joined up when he was 17 (he's 23 now). He seems to be enjoying it. He gets to see the world. :)

Also, my grandfather served in Malaysia in the 50s as part of his national service. He missed out fighting in World War II by about two years.

Librarian
12-12-08, 16:49
I'd to ask, was he fighting against the communists? If so, thanks a lot :hug: :tmb:

But of course :) He was finally awarded his medal for bravery only last year. I'll pass your thanks on to him if you don't mind, rowanlim.

madderakka
12-12-08, 20:39
Not me, but my husband was in the Navy for 10 years. We met shortly after he left bootcamp and he just got out last year due to a knee injury.

IceColdLaraCroft
12-12-08, 20:42
I <3 Men in uniform :D

Nausinous
12-12-08, 20:53
My boyfriends in the army, I'm very proud of him :D.

Goose
12-12-08, 20:59
Im in the Royal Air Force, originally joined the army then left to come here. Its a strange thing, when your in you hate it, when your out you miss it. But i can quite safely say anyone who yearns to be back in is viewing there service with rose tinted glasses, because being cut off from society, and your life and original identity, isnt as easy as you remember.

IceColdLaraCroft
12-12-08, 21:01
I always viewed the military as like being assimilated by the Borg

Goose
12-12-08, 21:02
I always viewed the military as like being assimilated by the Borg

And the military always view civi's as being idle ******s, its not true either way.

Believe it or not, but most guys i know get up to stuff most civilians wouldnt dare during leave. There far from indoctrinated into the core values that the military force upon you during the week or op tours/exercises.

Endow
12-12-08, 21:30
Im in the Royal Air Force, originally joined the army then left to come here. Its a strange thing, when your in you hate it, when your out you miss it. But i can quite safely say anyone who yearns to be back in is viewing there service with rose tinted glasses, because being cut off from society, and your life and original identity, isnt as easy as you remember.

You've mentioned something very important and the reason why I wouldn't consider going (although the physical training aspect is cool) - the army effectively changes people, for better or for worse. I've seen it.

Not to mention I have my views on selflessness and those do not entail obeying to some random guy that happens to be in charge. Maverick thinking is frowned upon so...

Goose
12-12-08, 21:44
You've mentioned something very important and the reason why I wouldn't consider going (although the physical training aspect is cool) - the army effectively changes people, for better or for worse. I've seen it.

Not to mention I have my views on selflessness and those do not entail obeying to some random guy that happens to be in charge. Maverick thinking is frowned upon so...

Maverick thinking is encouraged, as long as it benefits the service, the majoriy of service heros were the ones who took things outside the box. The individual part is more about going in your own time, eating what you want, very basic personal preferences, but they become important when there taken away.

Its not that bad, the majority of bs is self discipline, its odd but no matter who you are in the civilian world, when put under scrutiny your personnal admin is horrendous. To be a clean and effective person after a days work you should spend at least 3-4 hours of your evening cleaning/washing/ironing, otherwise your filthy in the eyes of the military. When you do 12 hour days it becomes a drag.

Nannonxyay
12-12-08, 21:52
I would never join the army because I don't believe in war. :wve:

Mad Tony
12-12-08, 22:58
I would never join the army because I don't believe in war. :wve:What about WWII? I hate to keep on using this as an example, but that was neccessary. Some people (like Hitler) don't listen to reason, nor do they do things diplomatically. War is always bad, I'm not denying that. However, was is sometimes neccessary.

I always viewed the military as like being assimilated by the BorgWell you don't know much about the military then. They're just normal people like you and I. Take my brother for example, you wouldn't know he was in the military unless he told you.

Draco
12-12-08, 23:12
United States Coast Guard is win.

IceColdLaraCroft
13-12-08, 00:23
Well you don't know much about the military then. They're just normal people like you and I. Take my brother for example, you wouldn't know he was in the military unless he told you.


you don't know me very well Mad Tony...I'm far from 'normal'

and where are the photos of hot military guys in/out of uniform?:jmp:

pemides
13-12-08, 01:04
Military service is compulsory for all men (there are some exceptions though, of course) in Finland, yes. Civilian service is an option as well, particularly for anti-militarists and pacifists who object to military service, but if you totally refuse to both you basically go to jail..

Woow, I would never see that coming from a country like Finland :yik:

I know there are many countries still with that system, but I thought it were only countries not so developed, or with great need for an army.

I always saw Finland, as all nordic countries to give very few importance to the army, and yet this? Mehh, I'm proud military service is not mandatory in Portugal.

Solice
13-12-08, 01:07
Ugh.. this thread just reminded me that I would have to go to the army next June/July.. But if I'm lucky, I wont have to. I'm moving abroad within just 6 days. Would suck big time if I would have to come back here to serve 6 months in the army. :(

I need to contact them asap.

Finland has a draft? It's much better serving in an all-volunteer force.

TRhalloween
13-12-08, 01:11
What about WWII? I hate to keep on using this as an example, but that was neccessary. Some people (like Hitler) don't listen to reason, nor do they do things diplomatically. War is always bad, I'm not denying that. However, was is sometimes neccessary.


I thought you were against taking human lives.

Punaxe
13-12-08, 01:13
Aw, no love for the police?
I've been quite seriously considering my second study choice, that being the Master in Criminal Investigation at the Police Academy. I think all civil servants deserve great respect, and would love to be either a politician or policeman. Police has my preference over the army as the work is more involved with things that are on the everyday citizen's mind, and more directly benefiting society.

Sometimes I think it's a bit of a shame we didn't have mandatory service in the army, I probably would've liked it :p

Solice
13-12-08, 03:01
Should I ever get in to nursing (a very real possibility at the moment) I'll probably join the military. Not only would they pay for my education, I'd come out of it with some sorely needed discipline and hopefully having done some good in the world.

One of my grandfathers fought at Kokoda in WWII, he passed away a few years ago. My other grandad fought in Malaysia during the 'Emergency' in the 50's, he'd kill me if I joined the army, lol.

I wanted to be an Air Force flight nurse. But I had to work during the day, and nursing school only has classes’ daytime. So I had to get what I could in evening classes.

You would really like it. It's the best nursing job in the world. Then when you are done there go to nurse anesthesiology school. They make about $150,000 a year.

Mr.Burns
13-12-08, 03:15
I wanted to be an Air Force flight nurse. But I had to work during the day, and nursing school only has classes’ daytime. So I had to get what I could in evening classes.

You would really like it. It's the best nursing job in the world. Then when you are done there go to nurse anesthesiology school. They make about $150,000 a year.
I have a friend of mine that is doing just that right now after serving in Iraq as a field medic. The profession is in high demand.

IceColdLaraCroft
13-12-08, 03:23
Aw, no love for the police?
I've been quite seriously considering my second study choice, that being the Master in Criminal Investigation at the Police Academy. I think all civil servants deserve great respect, and would love to be either a politician or policeman. Police has my preference over the army as the work is more involved with things that are on the everyday citizen's mind, and more directly benefiting society.

Sometimes I think it's a bit of a shame we didn't have mandatory service in the army, I probably would've liked it :p

Police are hot...as long as they are in shape :)

Shrantellatessa
13-12-08, 03:23
Never been in the military and I'm not planning to, but if my country's in war and is in urgent need for my service; then why not?

Solice
13-12-08, 04:35
I have a friend of mine that is doing just that right now after serving in Iraq as a field medic. The profession is in high demand.

Many people don’t realize how specialized and highly professional nursing has become. It takes many years of study.

Goose
13-12-08, 07:46
Many people don’t realize how specialized and highly professional nursing has become. It takes many years of study.

Depends on what you want to do, if you want to be a rear-rear line carer of the sick then you would have to study for a while, but most, if not all would be taught after basic training by the military at no cost to you. If you want to save lives on the battlefield the training wont be so long, as things like advanced cleaning and deeper psychological aspects arent needed. If i remember in the army, a combat medic course lasts about 10 months, including soldier training, then they send you to a hospital for abit then out into the field.

Get alot out of it in terms of qualifications.

Lara's Backpack
13-12-08, 09:35
Well I'll contact them on monday. I'm just afraid of me being stopped at the airport or something since I have an one way ticket. Blegh. But I still have like 6- 7 months left, so why should I be stopped?

Oh well. I did read something about citizens with two nationalities not having to do it anymore. I REALLY HOPE NOT!

Yeah, I had a few friends from South Korea whilst I was in highschool. To get out of their mandatory service they became citizens of Australia. So perhaps you can go for the same angle.

Im assuming when you contact them they'll be slightly evasive about giving you direct answer's on how to go about getting out of it. Often Ive found in situations like these, they wont be able to see why you wouldnt want to do it :hea:

MiCkiZ88
13-12-08, 09:46
Finland has a draft? It's much better serving in an all-volunteer force.Unfortunately, yes. Either 6 - 8 months of army, or a bit more in civil service. Neither - Jail for over a year.

It takes an part of my life that I'd spend on something else.
Yeah, I had a few friends from South Korea whilst I was in highschool. To get out of their mandatory service they became citizens of Australia. So perhaps you can go for the same angle.

Im assuming when you contact them they'll be slightly evasive about giving you direct answer's on how to go about getting out of it. Often Ive found in situations like these, they wont be able to see why you wouldnt want to do it :hea:
Hmmh.. they were a bit like that last summer when I called them and asked for an delay.

I doubt they will stop me at the airport or anything though. Some countries that have mandatory army do so though..

Goose
13-12-08, 10:02
Unfortunately, yes. Either 6 - 8 months of army, or a bit more in civil service. Neither - Jail for over a year.

It takes an part of my life that I'd spend on something else.

Hmmh.. they were a bit like that last summer when I called them and asked for an delay.

I doubt they will stop me at the airport or anything though. Some countries that have mandatory army do so though..

civil service would be the choice for you then, just crack on with it, its all character building, if you choose the army, after the 6 months you will be a stronger and more capable person, it will give you skills and a mind set that will last for the rest of your life.

MiCkiZ88
13-12-08, 10:05
civil service would be the choice for you then, just crack on with it, its all character building, if you choose the army, after the 6 months you will be a stronger and more capable person, it will give you skills and a mind set that will last for the rest of your life.Neither are an oppurtinity for me. I'm moving abroad within 5 days.

And frankly, all my friends have changed in to complete *******s after going trough army. Ah well..

Goose
13-12-08, 10:14
Alot of people are changed by the army, and see civilians as frustrating, thats mainly due to the strict routines and attention to detail thats forced on you and embedded into you during training, civilians are usually seriously lacking that, which can be frustrating.

Take my friend for instance, he was in our nearest main town, he saw an elderly man who had either been robbed or fallen badly down a side alley, there were literally hundreds of people who had just decided to walk on by, as if it were an accepted part of living in or around london, but as my mates in the military, his first thought is battle casulty drills, check for hazards, response, his airways/breathing. Standard procedures, things like that become who you are after military training.

You'll always do whats right, not walk on by to save yourself hassel.

MiCkiZ88
13-12-08, 10:23
Alot of people are changed by the army, and see civilians as frustrating, thats mainly due to the strict routines and attention to detail thats forced on you and embedded into you during training, civilians are usually seriously lacking that, which can be frustrating.

Take my friend for instance, he was in our nearest main town, he saw an elderly man who had either been robbed or fallen badly down a side alley, there were literally hundreds of people who had just decided to walk on by, as if it were an accepted part of living in or around london, but as my mates in the military, his first thought is battle casulty drills, check for hazards, response, his airways/breathing. Standard procedures, things like that become who you are after military training.

You'll always do whats right, not walk on by to save yourself hassel.
That I do understand, honestly. But not everyone is like that, and I'm rather sick of being seen as some lazy ass civilian who doesnt give a **** about others. That isn't the reason I want to do the army. To be seen as a man.

Maybe I will end up doing army later in my life after me and my boyfriend have done school and if we move here to Finland. It's not that I dont want to do it. Just right now the army doesnt seem to be the right choice when I have other things to arrange in my life.

Yes it might make me mentally stronger, but I'm afraid of changing in to something completely different. I've seen how others have changed, and it makes me worried.

Goose
13-12-08, 10:36
Dont worry about it, if finlands military training is anything like ours, itll make you into a warry mother ****er, you'll have the mental and physical courage to handle yourself in any situation, no matter how grim, you certainly wont take people messing you around anymore. In the uk, an infantry drill instructor at a training regiment usually has two to three tours under there belt, per tour in a place like Helmand afghanistan, infantry soldiers can kill up to 5-10 enemy combatants, snipers up to 30 in one case. They go on patrol for days to weeks, carrying there life on there back in 40kg packs, and endure firefights that last hours to days aswell. They have done and experienced things so far removed from the civilian world its impossible to comprehend, and they will instill those lessons in you during training.

you may become a *******, but thats only becuase those around you are being petty.

Mad Tony
13-12-08, 11:33
I thought you were against taking human lives.Oh I am. However, sometimes it is neccessary. WWII (from the Allied perspective) is a good example.

Lara's Backpack
13-12-08, 11:38
Oh I am. However, sometimes it is neccessary. WWII (from the Allied perspective) is a good example.

Sorry to get off topic here,

But WTH is your signature about then?? You are seriously *the* most frustrating poster Ive ever read from.


BOT... Mickiz, what's involved in "civil service"? Hopefully not useless community service crap.

Also, in reguards to the character building nonsense... Ive done a year in a Cadet Corp, also I went to a Grammar school which was all about "becoming a man" and "bettering oneself" which including all sorts of "character building" excersizes, like Midnight orienteering and long journey's trecking it on foot, bike, kayak for hours and hours and finally pitching tent in where-ever you happen to be that night before doing it all again the next day and let me tell you - it was hardly character-building. I think such events are more like 'character changing'. One simply adapts to the situations they are put in, or as someone brighter than me once said, "People dont change, the merely become more of who they are."

Whether you or your loved ones like what you "grow" into is another story.

My advice, change your citizenship and get out of it!

Or... just do civil service. Don't do anything military reguarded, as I said in the beginning of this thread - both my parents were in Army intelligence (and they have it pretty cushy when they're on home soil) and told me not to consider it.

Goose
13-12-08, 11:45
Sorry to get off topic here,

But WTH is your signature about then?? You are seriously *the* most frustrating poster Ive ever read from.

Put simply, if you have a problem with military personnel, tell it to there faces. It has nothing todo with warfare.

Mad Tony
13-12-08, 11:46
Put simply, if you have a problem with military personnel, tell it to there faces. It has nothing todo with warfare.Exactly. Hit the nail on the head :tmb: Supporting your nation's military personnel doesn't neccessarily mean you support war.

Lara's Backpack
13-12-08, 11:49
Put simply, if you have a problem with military personnel, tell it to there faces. It has nothing todo with warfare.

Is there something distinctly British about it then?

Because I would reguard "If you dont stand behind our troops" as: Not supporting what they are fighting for.

And "feel free to stand infront of them" as:
Standing in the way of fire for expressing these feelings of an un-supportive nature.

Just my thoughts.

Goose
13-12-08, 11:54
Is there something distinctly British about it then?

Because I would reguard "If you dont stand behind our troops" as: Not supporting what they are fighting for.

And "feel free to stand infront of them" as:
Standing in the way of fire for expressing these feelings of an un-supportive nature.

Just my thoughts.

Its not british, its just the nature or most uni kids, like to play around with the politics of warfare, but havnt got the guts to say it to a person whos in the militaries face, they havnt got the guts to say it to someone who lives and breath's there after school pass time, there coffee table discussion.

Lara's Backpack
13-12-08, 12:00
One could turn it around and say then that a person who's in the military wouldn't have the intelligence to live and breath the Uni atmosphere regardless:p :D

Only kidding. Surely you could agree with me though, that not every soldier is going to respect the choices of those made above him. And in Mickiz's case, where the military service would be enforced, surely soldiers in a similiar situation would be more than willing to speak about before doing something they see as backwards, or morally wrong.

Goose
13-12-08, 12:10
One could turn it around and say then that a person who's in the military wouldn't have the intelligence to live and breath the Uni atmosphere regardless:p :D

Only kidding. Surely you could agree with me though, that not every soldier is going to respect the choices of those made above him. And in Mickiz's case, where the military service would be enforced, surely soldiers in a similiar situation would be more than willing to speak about before doing something they see as backwards, or morally wrong.

believe me, the majority of my College friends have been to uni, and almost all the military people i know could easily out drink and out **** uni kids.

Very few soldiers/seamen/airmen respect those above them, its a pass time iv found in the military to moan about officers (almost all of whom are uni graduates) and there lack of sound realistic judgement (like the majority of there civilian counterparts it would seem) as opposed to the JNCO's. Its funny you should talk about morals, as thats what modern warfare is all about, our morals vs the enemies, they have none, and we have all in comparison. Counter revolutionary warfare is based on morals, hearts and minds.

Mickiz's in a different situation, finland is not in Iraq or Afghanistan, he is not fighting the 'unjust war' that i will be. He will spend his time doing public order duties or hanging out in barracks on call.

Lara's Backpack
13-12-08, 12:42
believe me, the majority of my College friends have been to uni, and almost all the military people i know could easily out drink and out **** uni kids.

Very few soldiers/seamen/airmen respect those above them, its a pass time iv found in the military to moan about officers (almost all of whom are uni graduates) and there lack of sound realistic judgement (like the majority of there civilian counterparts it would seem) as opposed to the JNCO's. Its funny you should talk about morals, as thats what modern warfare is all about, our morals vs the enemies, they have none, and we have all in comparison. Counter revolutionary warfare is based on morals, hearts and minds.

Mickiz's in a different situation, finland is not in Iraq or Afghanistan, he is not fighting the 'unjust war' that i will be. He will spend his time doing public order duties or hanging out in barracks on call.

Yes, yes I know all this. I come from a military family too, my step Dad is flying to Afganistan next month with the airforce actually, and both my parents are in contact with their old Army buddies who're still serving ~ so I know all about unwritten politics and the moaning about officers, and the tall poppy syndrome that goes on.

And while you, who is actively serving, can say that Mickiz will only be sent off for training, and spending time "on call" in bases is easy - you dont seem to realize that this is only because you're in the deeper pool so to speak. The shallows may not be deep to you, but to people above the surface they are... if that makes any sense at all.


My point really is, why should anyone living in a 1st world country have to serve their country willing or not? It seems to me that not having the freedom to choose or deny the choice the fight for freedom is paradoxical in nature and in my own opinion is backwards of a country that, like you stated, is not "Iraq" or "Afganistan".

Goose
13-12-08, 16:20
They have to serve for that exact reason, they are a 1st world country due to the fact that people have served in the passed, and to maintain there status people must continue to serve.

Not only is it for the protection of there borders and subjects, but also to maintain an order and moral values onto the citizens, in the uk national service is considered by alot of people to be the way forward when dealing with our 'troubled' youths. Like it was years ago.

Punaxe
13-12-08, 16:29
Mind if I take this opportunity to boast a little bit? My brother just became the youngest-ever (31) colonel in the Netherlands :D

tesorosbaby
13-12-08, 21:35
I'm a soldier in the British Army - Royal Military Police (Nausinous' bf)

I'm sat one camp right now in the NAFFI actually, about to go back to the block and do some revision for test day tomorrow - culmination of a long, hard, arduous course I've been doing.

I could be going to A'stan next September, OR I have the chance to do a three month posting to Kenya in April (guess which one I'll be doing) :ton:

As for the phrase that's been chukced around above - support us, because you probably wouldn't want and/or don't have the guts to be the ones standing in the line of fire.

No other employer on Earth will send you to die.

Remember that a soldier has gone through a lot of training and is VERY aware of the risks s/he puts themselves in. It hits you at times when you realise 'yeah, I could quite easily die'

Especially when I have to walk around Iraq/A'stan with a bright red beret on :ton:

Solice
13-12-08, 23:03
Mind if I take this opportunity to boast a little bit? My brother just became the youngest-ever (31) colonel in the Netherlands :D

Very cool:cool: