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Geck-o-Lizard
25-01-09, 18:58
http://laughing-stalk.blogspot.com/2009/01/president-barack-obama-offensive-sams.html

So there he was, minding his own business, doing his job at a Jacksonville, Fla. Sam's Club, when Shane Rhiles was asked to take his shirt off.

Why? Because a customer found the shirt – with President Barack Obama's face on it – offensive.

A story on Jacksonville's Channel 4 says that Rhiles was told by a supervisor that a customer didn't like the shirt, so he needed to go home and change.

"I was like, 'Is it that serious?'" Rhies told Channel 4. "She was like, 'Yes, because we don't need any problems.' I was like, 'Well he's the 44th president of the United States of America."

Overuse of "like" notwithstanding, it's out of line when a customer can claim to be offended by a t-shirt of our president. Especially when the shirt doesn't say anything offensive, depict anything offensive, or have anything offensive on it at all.

"He's our president – the first black president. This is an accomplishment for many people, so I didn't want to take the shift off and I wasn't going to take the shirt off," said Rhiles.

So instead, submitting to Wal-Mart/Sam's Club fascism and oppression of his First Amendment rights, Rhiles bought another shirt (I hope he got the employee discount), and wore it over the anarchic, chaos-inducing Obama t-shirt. Then he looked up Sam's Club dress code.

As far as t-shirts go, "associates may wear solid color T-shirts and denim shirts with logos as long as they do not contain messages that are offensive, crude or otherwise inappropriate."

So, either some bigot or die-hard Republican was offended by the face of our new president? Did someone not like the shirt, because it reminded them that their guy didn't win?

Since when is wearing the face of our country's leader on your shirt offensive? Would Sam's Club have done the same thing if McCain had won, and someone wore his t-shirt? (Or, more likely, his Bermuda shorts pulled up to his armpits.) If they're worried about people being offended by things in their store, then why do they sell Ann Coulter's books?

People in this country have an overdeveloped sense of entitled outrage. They think that just because they feel annoyed, they have to make life as difficult as they can for other people. If you don't like something, you're entitled to your feelings and your opinion. But you don't have the right to inflict your narrow-mindedness on someone else, just because you don't like what they think.

"His face is not offensive to me. I don't know if they may have a problem with it, but I think if you have a problem with his face, you need to reevaluate yourself because he's our president," Rhiles said.

bivvy
25-01-09, 19:00
Real pathetic stuff.

Fish.
25-01-09, 19:01
*facepalm*

So I suppose wearing a T-shirt with Bush's face on it would be inoffensive? ...Oh wait.

Smog
25-01-09, 19:01
The only shirts I find offensive are Hawaiin. :p

Nannonxyay
25-01-09, 19:04
How stupid. Just because someone doesn't like the person on the t-shirt? I see at least twenty Twilight fans wearing "Team Edward Cullen." T-shirts, and I don't tell them that they should change because I find it offensive. For pity's sake, people need to stop being so immature.

The same goes with this guy at a store who wears a shirt that says; "I like girls, who love girls." A christian person may find this offensive, or even a Lesbian, yet he still wears it. I can understand if it was something like that which they complained about.

xMiSsCrOfTx
25-01-09, 19:26
Sigh.

EmeraldFields
25-01-09, 19:27
Can't people find something better to argue over?

Geck-o-Lizard
25-01-09, 19:28
If it was a shirt of Tony Blair, then yeah, I could see where they're coming from, but...

Mad Tony
25-01-09, 19:30
If it was a shirt of Tony Blair, then yeah, I could see where they're coming from, but...How would that be offensive? :vlol:

But yeah, that's pretty stupid. Who get's offended by that? Honestly...

Nerd For Life
25-01-09, 19:32
Human stupidity knows no bounds. :D

Tihocan9
25-01-09, 19:34
Even though i dislike him I don't see how it's offenseive, no need to cause a ruckus on something so simple, there are much bigger things about Obama you can be arguing about.

takamotosan
25-01-09, 19:36
i'm not diggin obama much, but that's just ridiculous.

that's like finding PBS offensive.

haha

Fallen.Angel
25-01-09, 19:48
I find it offensive that they find the shirt offensive. No, but in all seriousness, this is just silly if you ask me. :confused:

raiderfun
25-01-09, 19:52
Obviously, people always have to find a ridiculous thing to argue on :rolleyes:

Some Americans are just so stupid ! :rolleyes:

Jinkss
25-01-09, 19:54
Don't they have uniforms at Sam's club?

EmeraldFields
25-01-09, 19:56
Some Americans are just so stupid ! :rolleyes:

Sometimes the media gives us a bad rep.:p

I would like to think the majority of us have common sense.:)

the hooliganz
25-01-09, 19:57
This is so stupid, its just a shirt!

sigh

raiderfun
25-01-09, 20:06
Sometimes the media gives us a bad rep.:p

I would like to think the majority of us have common sense.:)

Could be. But some Americans give a bad image of themselves and keep showing how ignorant they are. Best solution is to be open-minded and to develop the general knowledge ;)

This is so stupid, its just a shirt!

sigh

Just a shirt ? Even if it was something bigger, what's wrong ? Isn't he the president of the US ? Aren't people free to express and show their feelings, joy, etc ?

SamReeves
25-01-09, 20:09
I'm sure the response would be quite different on this thread if it were George W. Bush on the t-shirt.

With that being said, wearing political shirts to work of either party is not a great idea. Sure it's something you can chat about on break, but otherwise I think you shouldn't show it on the job.

Forwen
25-01-09, 20:09
If they're worried about people being offended by things in their store, then why do they sell Ann Coulter's books?


That's actually a good point. What if someone marched into the store and demanded her books be taken off the stalls because they find the mere sight of them offensive?

Mad Tony
25-01-09, 20:11
Some Americans are just so stupid ! :rolleyes:So too are people from every other nation on the globe. I didn't think it'd be long before an anti-American comment sprung up in this thread. The sooner people learn stupidity is not exclusive to race or nationality, the better.

I'm sure the response would be quite different on this thread if it were George W. Bush on the t-shirt.You're right there. Don't want anyone supporting those evil Republicans...

rickybazire
25-01-09, 20:17
He's just being proud. Taking his shirt off is silly.

IceColdLaraCroft
25-01-09, 20:18
So too are people from every other nation on the globe. I didn't think it'd be long before an anti-American comment sprung up in this thread. The sooner people learn stupidity is not exclusive to race or nationality, the better.

No where else, but America, would someone send the worker home to change. Anywhere else they would've said "if you dont like it, dont come back here again."

Have you ever even been in America for longer than a holiday? I think you have a blurred vision of what it is like to live here for an extende period of time.

Mad Tony
25-01-09, 20:20
No where else, but America, would someone send the worker home to change. Anywhere else they would've said "if you dont like it, dont come back here again."

Have you ever even been in America for longer than a holiday? I think you have a blurred vision of what it is like to live here for an extende period of time.The United Kingdom. Political correctness here is just as bad as it is in the states, if not worse. I think I might have to ask you the same question. Have you ever been to the UK for longer than a holiday?

Shrantellatessa
25-01-09, 20:26
So let's all wear Obama T-Shirts and incade the mall or the "offended" individual's house :pi:

raiderfun
25-01-09, 20:27
I'm sure the response would be quite different on this thread if it were George W. Bush on the t-shirt.


George Bush has been president for 8 years, during which he commited many acts, if the same thing occured now, I would understand, but thinking that it's offensive to wear a shirt with the face of a president who has just started and who has only positive intentions, that's so offensive !


So too are people from every other nation on the globe. I didn't think it'd be long before an anti-American comment sprung up in this thread. The sooner people learn stupidity is not exclusive to race or nationality, the better.

Never said the opposite, stupids and ignorants are everywhere. But some Americans have reached the top, and the worst is that they keep on showing how narrow-minded they are. :/

Mad Tony
25-01-09, 20:29
Never said the opposite, stupids and ignorants are everywhere. But some Americans have reached the top, and the worst is that they keep on showing how narrow-minded they are. :/But so too are people of other nationalities. It's really nothing new.

IceColdLaraCroft
25-01-09, 20:30
The United Kingdom. Political correctness here is just as bad as it is in the states, if not worse. I think I might have to ask you the same question. Have you ever been to the UK for longer than a holiday?

You never answered my question.

yes I have, but I don't go around watching tv shows/having political opinions because of some deluded notion that I know what it's like to be a citizen of that country.

It's very annoying that you sit thousands of miles away and empathize with something you know nothing about except what you've seen on the news and The West Wing.

The world consists of more than just the US/UK.

Mad Tony
25-01-09, 20:32
You never answered my question.

yes I have, but I don't go around watching tv shows/having political opinions because of some deluded notion that I know what it's like to be a citizen of that country.

It's very annoying that you sit thousands of miles away and empathize with something you know nothing about except what you've seen on the news and The West Wing.

The world consists of more than just the US/UK.I never claimed to know what it was like to be a US citizen. You don't need to be a US citizen to know that ignorance and stupidity are things that are not exclusive to Americans.

You're being presumptuous, again. Just because I don't live in America doesn't mean I don't know things about it. And no, the things I do know about it do not come from the news or The West Wing.

Lol, where does The West Wing come into this? It's a fictional TV drama, something I watch for entertainment.

Neteru
25-01-09, 20:37
Oh give it a rest the pair of you.

Cochrane
25-01-09, 20:42
Could be. But some Americans give a bad image of themselves and keep showing how ignorant they are. Best solution is to be open-minded and to develop the general knowledge ;)

You have to consider that the USA are just larger than most other countries. If someone does something stupid in, say, Europe, there's a rather low chance that it happens in any particular country. If someone does something stupid in North America, however, it's most likely that it's happening in the US, just due to statistics.

As for the topic: Well, as has been pointed out, a lot of people would certainly be offended by Bush T-shirts. I'd just try to avoid political messages, and the US president is certainly a political figure, while at work, but that does not necessarily mean that I think you should have to do that.

Tonyrobinson
25-01-09, 20:57
Obama t-shirts are actually pretty popular in N. Ireland I've seen loadsa them.

Punaxe
25-01-09, 21:30
Weird stuff. But of course, store clerics should wear as neutral clothes as possible. Any follow-up to it?

Quasimodo
25-01-09, 21:31
I'm sure the response would be quite different on this thread if it were George W. Bush on the t-shirt.

With that being said, wearing political shirts to work of either party is not a great idea. Sure it's something you can chat about on break, but otherwise I think you shouldn't show it on the job.
Perhaps so, but he should still have been able to wear the shirt if he wanted to - freedom of expression and all. It's not like the shirt was vulgar or intentionally insulting (like calling all Republicans closed minded), so if the shirt was acceptable under the employee dress code, what gives?

I can understand why the employee's supervisor would ask him to take off a shirt if it offended customers and lost some sales, but sometimes the customer is wrong. People gotta get a grip.

Bustus
25-01-09, 22:14
That there are people who manage to find someone wearing a t-shirt with a political message they disagree with offensive doesn't surprise me at all. What does, however, is this:

She was like, 'Yes, because we don't need any problems.'

Huh? :confused:

Candee Sparks
25-01-09, 22:52
I HAVE an Obama shirt and that makes me want to wear it tomorrow. I can understand store policy and such, since it is considered propaganda and businesses should keep their practices as neutral and unbiased as possible because things like this can offend people but for all the wrong reasons.

Thankfully all we have to wear to work is black everything. :p

SamReeves
25-01-09, 22:55
George Bush has been president for 8 years, during which he commited many acts, if the same thing occured now, I would understand, but thinking that it's offensive to wear a shirt with the face of a president who has just started and who has only positive intentions, that's so offensive !

Never said the opposite, stupids and ignorants are everywhere. But some Americans have reached the top, and the worst is that they keep on showing how narrow-minded they are. :/

Good Lord, a lot of that remains to be seen. For the narrow-minded rhetoric, don't you think Obama's socialist leaning tendencies are offensive to me and other Republicans? Perhaps a t-shirt of his picture may not set me off, but if it included a political text message, I'd probably grumble. Not something I'd want to see as a customer. For example in my town, there's an ice cream shop owner who is very left wing. He distributes many anti-war phamphlets, 9/11 conspiracy literature, etc. Frankly I want no part of that or his ice cream. I find it offensive, and I don't want to shop there. I'm sure there are many other people in my town who feel the same way. It's bad business to be very polarized like that. I'd rather go eat ice cream without the political messages.

Perhaps so, but he should still have been able to wear the shirt if he wanted to - freedom of expression and all. It's not like the shirt was vulgar or intentionally insulting (like calling all Republicans closed minded), so if the shirt was acceptable under the employee dress code, what gives?

LOL, hey I endured "close minded" so many times during discussions here over the election. It was the generic answer to everything! ;)

I can understand why the employee's supervisor would ask him to take off a shirt if it offended customers and lost some sales, but sometimes the customer is wrong. People gotta get a grip.

Not really. The goal of a business is to make money. That would be taking money from somebody who is a Democrat, Republican, or independent. Money is money regardless of whom it comes from. Potential political messages could offend all three, therefore I understand why the manager told the employee to go change.

jamieoliver22
25-01-09, 23:08
What is the world coming to? How pathetic.

Mr.Burns
26-01-09, 00:13
The discussion of sex, politics and religion should be refrained from in the workplace. In fact many of not most places of employment in the US specifically state this when the employee first starts working. Regardless of pride in one's president, it is still a political statement. Given the highly charged atmosphere that accompanies such topics, it's a prudent policy to follow in the workplace. So, too bad for him but if he or anyone else signs such agreements when they start without reading the fine print, it's their fault. Free speech is all well and good but since it's very easy for someone to sue a company for being offended or what have you, the employers have the right to protect themselves.

AmericanAssassin
26-01-09, 01:33
I work at Walmart, personally (which is the sister company), and I can't imagine that happening. Majority of my bosses (and everybody else in my town) are Republicans, but they're not that ridiculous. :rolleyes:

croft94
26-01-09, 03:15
I wore a T-shirt of MJ once to school (I lost a bet) and then my teacher was arguing with the principal of my rights and she wanted me to speak in a court!

:vlol:

Rai
26-01-09, 11:55
Oh good god, what ever next. How can a t-shirt with just the president's face on it be offensive? Wouldn't taking his shirt off have health and safety issues? Some other customer could complain about that too! :rolleyes:

This gave me visions of Gordon Brown t-shirts....*shivers* :p (Jk)

petujaymz
26-01-09, 13:17
I'm up in arms I am...

Livid ain't the ****ing word!

:wve:

aileenwuornos
26-01-09, 13:38
the only shirts i find offensive are hawaiin. :p

lol!

gbetch
26-01-09, 14:26
This is great!!!, this is straight outta my own home town no less!!!! it is true that PC has gotten rather out f hand and ppl are always looking for something to complain about. i think next time i go to Hot Pocket...im mean Hot TOPIC. im going to demand that they take down all the twilight stuff because it depicts Vampires incorrectly. yep thats what im ganna do.

Forwen
26-01-09, 16:20
Good Lord, a lot of that remains to be seen. For the narrow-minded rhetoric, don't you think Obama's socialist leaning tendencies are offensive to me and other Republicans? Perhaps a t-shirt of his picture may not set me off, but if it included a political text message, I'd probably grumble. Not something I'd want to see as a customer. For example in my town, there's an ice cream shop owner who is very left wing. He distributes many anti-war phamphlets, 9/11 conspiracy literature, etc. Frankly I want no part of that or his ice cream. I find it offensive, and I don't want to shop there. I'm sure there are many other people in my town who feel the same way. It's bad business to be very polarized like that. I'd rather go eat ice cream without the political messages.

So you're for censorship? Auto-censorship? Political correctness? Bad news: living with freedom of expression can be tough.

rowanlim
26-01-09, 16:23
Such a petty thing to quarrel about...If T-shirts with Obama on it are offensive, I'd like to take a torch to various other T-shirts :rolleyes:

Forwen
26-01-09, 16:25
Such a petty thing to quarrel about...If T-shirts with Obama on it are offensive, I'd like to take a torch to various other T-shirts :rolleyes:

Che anyone? :D Let's throw them into a huge pyre, that's a truly revolutionary thing to do.

rowanlim
26-01-09, 16:27
Che anyone? :D Let's throw them into a huge pyre, that's a truly revolutionary thing to do.

Then many people will be walking around topless :D

Geck-o-Lizard
26-01-09, 16:27
So you're for censorship? Auto-censorship? Political correctness? Bad news: living with freedom of expression can be tough.

Funny how advocates of "small government" support meddlesome leadership when it suits them. :whi:

[edit] he never said anything about restricting what people can put on their t-shirts though, only that he wouldn't want to see it. The fun thing about freedom of expression is the freedom to ignore expressions we disagree with. :P

CerebralAssassin
26-01-09, 16:30
although I'd have to admit you'd have to be a real asshole to be offended by such petty things,I really can't blame the store manager for telling that employee to take the shirt off.they're doing what's best for business.

Mona Sax
26-01-09, 16:31
Good Lord, a lot of that remains to be seen. For the narrow-minded rhetoric, don't you think Obama's socialist leaning tendencies are offensive to me and other Republicans?
Offensive? I could understand that if he attacked you in some way, but I don't see how differing political views could be considered offensive. For example, you know I'm not likely to ever become friends with Bush or Palin. But their views offensive? No way. I just don't agree with them.

As for the actual topic, I'm all for freedom of speech. As long as no laws are violated and nobody gets vilified, people should be able to wear whatever they want, wherever they want. Live and let live.

interstellardave
26-01-09, 16:33
Sams Club would have done the same thing if he had worn a Bush shirt and some-one had complained. All it takes is a complaint these days and all hell breaks loose; I don't think Sams Club exhibited any kind of political bias--I think they showed their spineless nature.

EDIT: I also think that they should rewrite their policy, because shirts of a political nature could indicate a corporate support for that politician or party. Usually policies can't be left to judgement-calls they have to be explicit.

Nannonxyay
26-01-09, 16:39
I'm sure the response would be quite different on this thread if it were George W. Bush on the t-shirt.

With that being said, wearing political shirts to work of either party is not a great idea. Sure it's something you can chat about on break, but otherwise I think you shouldn't show it on the job.

Of course it wouldn't be. Maybe, I'd laugh. But stressing over a person's face is stupid. :p

Phys
26-01-09, 16:49
-sigh

Forwen
26-01-09, 17:09
Funny how advocates of "small government" support meddlesome leadership when it suits them. :whi:

[edit] he never said anything about restricting what people can put on their t-shirts though, only that he wouldn't want to see it. The fun thing about freedom of expression is the freedom to ignore expressions we disagree with. :P

I have an idealistic belief in the right in that they oppose political correctness on principle, and not because it happens to favour social ideas they disagree with. Perhaps my hope is misguided.

interstellardave
26-01-09, 17:11
I have an idealistic belief in the right in that they oppose political correctness on principle, and not because it happens to favour social ideas they disagree with. Perhaps my hope is misguided.

I try always to base my every opinion on principle, never personal preferences. Folks like us seem to be few and far between, however.

violentblossom
26-01-09, 17:24
what the feck.

.....

i'm offended that anyone finds Obama shirts offensive.

SamReeves
26-01-09, 17:32
So you're for censorship? Auto-censorship? Political correctness? Bad news: living with freedom of expression can be tough.

I am when it means earning money in a business. Although I don't personally like the Happy Holidays bit during Christmas time, it does cover the ass of most corporations. I understand why they do it. Thus why the manager told the employee to go change.

As for the actual topic, I'm all for freedom of speech. As long as no laws are violated and nobody gets vilified, people should be able to wear whatever they want, wherever they want. Live and let live.

Freedom of speech at a private business? There is no such thing. Employees need to conduct themselves in a professional manner or risk being fired.

violentblossom
26-01-09, 17:37
Freedom of speech at a private business? There is no such thing. Employees need to conduct themselves in a professional manner or risk being fired.

i don't see why supporting our current president can be considered "unprofessional"..

Mona Sax
26-01-09, 17:39
Freedom of speech at a private business? There is no such thing. Employees need to conduct themselves in a professional manner or risk being fired.
Does that say something about employees or employers?

interstellardave
26-01-09, 17:40
i don't see why supporting our current president can be considered "unprofessional"..

Actually, if it puts off consumers, then it can be considered inappropriate... it does reflect on the business as a whole. A George Bush shirt could have offended people too, and would have caused as much or more of a stir. Personally I wouldn't want to bend under pressure from one persons' complaint, but I see the business aspect of it.

Does that say something about employees or employers?

Would you want someone employed by the State to wear a religious shirt? It could be viewed as that persons' own personal view... but you know it wouldn't. It would be cause for a great amount of hassle...

Cochrane
26-01-09, 17:48
Well, what is more important: That the store (or whatever it was) is politically neutral towards its employees, or that the store and its employees as one coherent organization are politically neutral towards the customers?

So closely after the election and then inauguration, it can be said that Obama is still seen by many as more of a partisan figure than as a unified leader of all americans. Whether that changes remains to be seen, but right now, assuming that an Obama t-shirt means support of a particular political party is not far-fetched.

Forwen
26-01-09, 17:50
I am when it means earning money in a business. Although I don't personally like the Happy Holidays bit during Christmas time, it does cover the ass of most corporations. I understand why they do it. Thus why the manager told the employee to go change.

The real question is why it's even an issue, and the answer is ridiculous law/custom that allows *****ly whiners (wtf? I mean touchy!) to make a public problem of such little things. While such conduct is allowed it does make sense for companies to "cover their ass" (why not just introduce uniforms though) but it's not a normal situation to begin with. Oh, and Merry Christmas 2009! ;)

I try always to base my every opinion on principle, never personal preferences. Folks like us seem to be few and far between, however.

Yeah. The day the right starts abusing the word "offensive" we're all doomed :p

Joely-Moley
26-01-09, 17:53
*sigh*
What isn’t offensive these days.

interstellardave
26-01-09, 17:59
The real question is why it's even an issue, and the answer is ridiculous law/custom that allows *****ly whiners (wtf? I mean touchy!) to make a public problem of such little things. While such conduct is allowed it does make sense for companies to "cover their ass" (why not just introduce uniforms though) but it's not a normal situation to begin with. Oh, and Merry Christmas 2009! ;)



Yeah. The day the right starts abusing the word "offensive" we're all doomed :p

That's the heart of the matter right there... people are SO easily offended. I wouldn't ever complain about what an employee was wearing, personally. Although I'm sure studies have been done about consumer reaction to employee looks, dress, etc... whether that reaction is verbal or just in the form of not coming back to that store.... in terms of "the bottom line" I'm sure that data makes policy, and I'm sure there's validity in it when viewed from a certain perspective.

I'd take some offense if a store employee was busy stumping for Obama, or Bush, or anyone else, rather than helping me... but if he/she is wearing a shirt with that politician on it I frankly don't care. That's not bothersome to me... but that's just me. Many people are always looking for something to complain about!

Political correctness is something that I abhor, and it should go the way of the Dodo bird, rather than be wielded by all parties in an attempt to "one-up" each other. We all lose in that eventuality.

Mona Sax
26-01-09, 18:17
Would you want someone employed by the State to wear a religious shirt? It could be viewed as that persons' own personal view... but you know it wouldn't. It would be cause for a great amount of hassle...
As long as it's just an expression of that person's views and not an attempt to change my own, I wouldn't care. The state itself should stay neutral, of course, but I think it's important to differentiate between employees as representatives of the state and employees as individual people. For example, I don't think it would be a good idea for public schools to use religious symbols or for Obama to try and legitimate his power with any kind of spiritual calling. Should students be able to pray to their god, whichever it may be, individually or in groups, or to choose not to? Should Obama be free to go to whichever church he wants, whenever he wants? Absolutely.

People should be free to express themselves as long as they don't harm others, even more so in private businesses than in public office. I don't see how anybody could be offended by people just being themselves, provided they follow that one simple rule.

interstellardave
26-01-09, 18:29
People should be free to express themselves as long as they don't harm others, even more so in private businesses than in public office. I don't see how anybody could be offended by people just being themselves, provided they follow that one simple rule.

Obviousy we agree on that principle... the reality of the situation, however, is that so many people (of all political or religious persuasions) do not.

So I don't agree with Sams' Club forcing the guy to change his shirt--particularly since it clearly wasn't something forbidden in their employee guidelines--but I do understand why they did that (although I consider the reaction spineless).

To offend someone these days seems to be the greatest crime anyone can commit! And, since almost anything can be offensive to someone, ridiculousness can ensue.

MattTR
26-01-09, 18:46
Oh come on.. what isn't offensive now days? :rolleyes:

For crying out loud, I bet my love for Lara Croft's bewbs are offensive to some. You just can't win, ever.. :(

violentblossom
26-01-09, 18:52
Oh come on.. what isn't offensive now days? :rolleyes:

For crying out loud, I bet my love for Lara Croft's bewbs are offensive to some. You just can't win, ever.. :(

Lara Croft has BEWBS?! What?! Oh. My. Flippin'. Sweet. Jaysus, everyone who play video games is living in sin!

I'm offended, and i'm gonna write a letter.

Sir Croft
26-01-09, 19:19
I'd go back there in the other day wearing Obama jeans, Obama shirt, Obama shoes, Obama cap and Obama underwear that reads "Yes, you can".
Seriously, how can the image of the president be offensive? That's stupid.

MattTR
26-01-09, 19:20
Lara Croft has BEWBS?! What?! Oh. My. Flippin'. Sweet. Jaysus, everyone who play video games is living in sin!

I'm offended, and i'm gonna write a letter.

You should be! :eek:

You do that, please! :vlol:

raiderfun
26-01-09, 19:42
Offensive? I could understand that if he attacked you in some way, but I don't see how differing political views could be considered offensive. For example, you know I'm not likely to ever become friends with Bush or Palin. But their views offensive? No way. I just don't agree with them.

As for the actual topic, I'm all for freedom of speech. As long as no laws are violated and nobody gets vilified, people should be able to wear whatever they want, wherever they want. Live and let live.

I wholeheartedly agree with you :tmb:

I am when it means earning money in a business. Although I don't personally like the Happy Holidays bit during Christmas time, it does cover the ass of most corporations. I understand why they do it. Thus why the manager told the employee to go change.

Freedom of speech at a private business? There is no such thing. Employees need to conduct themselves in a professional manner or risk being fired.

Yes, I know, but which professional manner ? There's nothing unusual it it, it's the employee's personnal life and he/she's free to wear whatever he/she wants. Is he violating the law ?

I'd go back there in the other day wearing Obama jeans, Obama shirt, Obama shoes, Obama cap and Obama underwear that reads "Yes, you can".

Haha, great idea ! :D

Seriously, how can the image of the president be offensive? That's stupid.

Some people are just offensive, that's it ;)

SamReeves
26-01-09, 20:01
People should be free to express themselves as long as they don't harm others, even more so in private businesses than in public office. I don't see how anybody could be offended by people just being themselves, provided they follow that one simple rule.


Yes, I know, but which professional manner ? There's nothing unusual it it, it's the employee's personnal life and he/she's free to wear whatever he/she wants. Is he violating the law ?

I believe both of you are living in another world. The point of a business is to earn money, not to express political opinions and peeve your customers by doing so. When you get home, wear what you want, say what you want. Business is not a democracy and there is a reason for a dress code at most of them.

Cochrane
26-01-09, 20:03
Yes, I know, but which professional manner ? There's nothing unusual it it, it's the employee's personnal life and he/she's free to wear whatever he/she wants. Is he violating the law ? (emphasis mine)

Is it? I mean, when he's not in the store, sure, it is, but during business hours, doing his work, there's a certain amount of, well, personality that one just has to give up. It's not like he's getting nothing in return for this small sacrifice (namely, he's getting money).

Mona Sax
27-01-09, 05:28
I believe both of you are living in another world. The point of a business is to earn money, not to express political opinions and peeve your customers by doing so.
All I'm saying is that they shouldn't be mutually exclusive. That many businesses think they are just shows that people aren't tolerant enough.

Paddy
27-01-09, 05:47
If it was a shirt of Tony Blair, then yeah, I could see where they're coming from, but...

Haha or Johnny Howard.

Ward Dragon
27-01-09, 06:10
All I'm saying is that they shouldn't be mutually exclusive. That many businesses think they are just shows that people aren't tolerant enough.

I don't see what tolerance has to do with it. People go to stores to shop, not to see employees' political messages. People generally don't want to be reminded of politics while trying to buy food, supplies, etc. because it is annoying. If people get annoyed enough at a store then they'll find somewhere else to shop. It's perfectly natural to expect a store like Walmart to be neutral towards religion and politics.

Considering this specific case, the person who complained is probably a jerk. But in general, I think it's perfectly reasonable for a store to forbid employees from wearing political shirts (as long as that's clearly stated in advance so employees know what they are allowed to wear).