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View Full Version : About 1 in 5 newly licensed nurses quits within a year


Solice
17-02-09, 05:36
That is an amazing statistic. Story (http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20090216/ap_on_he_me/med_nursing_shortage)


I have always wanted to be a nurse, particularly a military nurse after watching Major Houlihan while growing up. But circumstances did not lead me in that direction. I am a software developer.

This is just me thinking out loud...

I still wonder if it is worth pursuing. I can't be a military nurse. But perhaps I can get into a specialty. But it would mean I would have to sell my home and use all my savings.

When I read articles like this, the saying, "Be careful what you ask for, you may get it" chimes in my head.

Are there any nurses here who want to comment?

spikejones
17-02-09, 05:51
not a nurse myself, but I think that type thing can apply anywhere in life. while the aura of the field may seem attractive upon a cursory glance, it can rear its ugly head once you have delved into it. it certainly takes a specific type of personality to do, and be good at, certain types of work. Software development may seem attractive at a glance and you say "hey ... cool... I want to start developing applications to help people." or "hey... cool... I want to make awesome video games!" and you devote years to learning how to do it. But then you get thrown into the workforce doing it for real and you find yourself banging your head against code for hours on end wishing that things would just work the same everywhere, but it doesn't. And you get the feeling of wanting to just give it all up because it just seems to much. But if you have what it takes, if you have determination and perseverance to see it through, you get rewarded for your efforts when it is all said and done.

you get the satisfaction of a job well done and knowing that you have done something to make a difference in the lives of others.

patriots88888
17-02-09, 07:32
It's all those bedpans that need changing! http://bestsmileys.com/puking/4.gif

Lara's Backpack
17-02-09, 08:02
I almost took Nursing instead of my BA. But who knows where Ill end up, Uni is so flexible once youre in the system.

rowanlim
17-02-09, 10:05
I'm not a nurse, but I think that nursing is a demanding job, physically & emotionally. It takes a very strong person to dedicate his/her time for a job that can be very frustrating sometimes.

I think if you think it'll be worth it, then go ahead :tmb: It's important to have a passion for what you do :)

rickybazire
17-02-09, 10:47
It's all those bedpans that need changing! http://bestsmileys.com/puking/4.gif

Haha yeah.

I suppose it's just a bit of a stressful job and a lot to know and that you can easily go wrong...oo-err...

scion05
17-02-09, 13:14
I'm probably going into nursing so this isn't exactly what I'd call hopeful.

Jo269976
17-02-09, 13:52
It's all those bedpans that need changing! http://bestsmileys.com/puking/4.gif

...tasty? :o

Personally, I couldn't handle a job where there's a chance you'll be seeing people who are going to dying and suffering, everyday.

scion05
17-02-09, 14:32
Doesn't really bother me, what you have to remember is that you're
helping make those last few days of their lives happy and worthwhile.
The same with caring. I've just literally had a home-visit from a volunteer
manager with Nugent Care, and I'm going to volunteer at a carehome within
the next few months :)

Encore
17-02-09, 15:37
I've always admired people who become doctors, surgeons, nurses, etc., because I recognize it's a very helpful profession - but I was always aware that I could never do it myself, I simply don't have the stomach, so to speak. But there are so many kids entering these courses, I didn't really need that statistic to know that a great deal of them are just attracted by the "aura" of the thing (like spikejones says) but don't realize what it REALLY takes to become a professional... Fortunately these courses are hard and take very long to complete, enough time and practice for them to realize if it's their vocation or not.

LaraLuvrrr
17-02-09, 15:54
Omg how funny you post this!! I was actually looking to be a nurse a few weeks ago but like your title says many quit. The reason for this is the amount of stress and things that nurses have to deal with. Imo they sometimes have more crap to do then doctors. I mean doctors deal with more complicated things but they can order nurses around all day to do multiple things. Plus nurses have to do all kinds of things. Here are some examples:
bathing people
feeding them (even through feeding tubes)
handling their urine bags and inserting cafeters
dressing wounds, putting stiches, giving IVs, shots, drawing blood
making the rounds each day to see who died the night before and notify doctor
cleaning vomit off patients or floor and blood off of things
plus nurses have like 12 hour shifts in hospitals. Forget 9 to 5 these people work half a day. And they work shifts meaning sumtimes night sometimes day and may be on call

xx_Hunt_xx
17-02-09, 17:45
Im a student nurse atm
and i can understand why the nurses wud quit after a year
im only a student nurse and half the time i feel like just shouting "I GIVE UP" people have no idea of the ammount of hours, time, stress, violence and grief you get given!

spikejones
17-02-09, 18:09
helping make those last few days of their lives happy and worthwhile.
Not everyone in the hospital is going to die in a couple days you know. I've had plenty of occasion to land myself in the hospital under non life and death situations. Its more a matter of simply helping them and making a difference in their life period.
The reason for this is the amount of stress and things that nurses have to deal with. Imo they sometimes have more crap to do then doctors. I mean doctors deal with more complicated things but they can order nurses around all day to do multiple things.

Im a student nurse atm
and i can understand why the nurses wud quit after a year
im only a student nurse and half the time i feel like just shouting "I GIVE UP" people have no idea of the ammount of hours, time, stress, violence and grief you get given!
Hate to burst you guys' bubbles, but this type thing is present in any work field, even in general life itself. Everyone gets ordered to spend countless hours handling multiple, stressful tasks. The difference is whether you find those tasks enjoyable or not. You have to decide whether the satisfaction of helping people outweighs the negatives of the work. Apparently it does for some people, and not for others.

Lara's Backpack
18-02-09, 02:32
Hate to burst you guys' bubbles, but this type thing is present in any work field, even in general life itself. Everyone gets ordered to spend countless hours handling multiple, stressful tasks. The difference is whether you find those tasks enjoyable or not. You have to decide whether the satisfaction of helping people outweighs the negatives of the work. Apparently it does for some people, and not for others.

Says you who is unemployed! :D :p

Solice
18-02-09, 02:38
not a nurse myself, but I think that type thing can apply anywhere in life. while the aura of the field may seem attractive upon a cursory glance, it can rear its ugly head once you have delved into it. it certainly takes a specific type of personality to do, and be good at, certain types of work. Software development may seem attractive at a glance and you say "hey ... cool... I want to start developing applications to help people." or "hey... cool... I want to make awesome video games!" and you devote years to learning how to do it. But then you get thrown into the workforce doing it for real and you find yourself banging your head against code for hours on end wishing that things would just work the same everywhere, but it doesn't. And you get the feeling of wanting to just give it all up because it just seems to much. But if you have what it takes, if you have determination and perseverance to see it through, you get rewarded for your efforts when it is all said and done.

you get the satisfaction of a job well done and knowing that you have done something to make a difference in the lives of others.

True, misery or happiness can be applied to any field. I am very good at what I do, and I am near the top of my field. And I do enjoy it.

But I don’t romanticize it like I do nursing. Maybe since its been kept out of my reach its forbidden fruit.

Every time I meet a nurse it's like I am meeting a celebrity. It's crazy:jmp: I make twice as much as most nurses (100k) and I look at them like.."Wow"

scion05
18-02-09, 11:08
Not everyone in the hospital is going to die in a couple days you know. I've had plenty of occasion to land myself in the hospital under non life and death situations. Its more a matter of simply helping them and making a difference in their life period.


Well yes I know that, but I was talking about those who aren't going to survive, in response to the comment I was replying to.

Lara's Backpack
18-02-09, 11:29
Well yes I know that, but I was talking about those who aren't going to survive, in response to the comment I was replying to.

And not all nurses have to work in hospitals, if you get the grades to get into Uni do end up taking nursing - usually you get to elect where you'd like your clinical placement to be. At least, thats how it works down here to my knowledge.

Anne Boleyn
18-02-09, 13:22
My mother is a nurse and, throughout my time at school, she constantly told me, 'DO NOT GO INTO NURSING'.

Part of the reason she gave is something that very few people consider: the bureaucracy of it, especially in Britain. A lot of nurses' work is thankless, and they are compelled to do a lot within the confines set in place by their grade; all whilst battling with the opinions of doctors, social workers, and various others in the health service hierarchy. All that and blood, too!

scion05
18-02-09, 13:31
And not all nurses have to work in hospitals, if you get the grades to get into Uni do end up taking nursing - usually you get to elect where you'd like your clinical placement to be. At least, thats how it works down here to my knowledge.

I'm hoping to work in a hospital :) I'm going for the diploma ( 5C's at GCSE [ im predicted mostly B's and a few A's ] ) but I am still doing A-Levels anyway. The only reasing I'm doing the diploma is because of the money problems, it will keep me out of massive debt, and I can do the degree afterwards.

Lara's Backpack
18-02-09, 13:36
Money problems? Here in Australia they earn quite a nice salary. I think the average is 40-50k in their first year (17 976 - 22 470 GBP) so no, you wouldnt have to worry about money! :p

I think its a worthwhile career, but for all I know it could be total crap in Britain, but here in Australia they're quite highly reguarded and treated usually quite well in the hospital. Everyone knows they're the backbone of the hospital, the ones that actually deal with the patients - not the doctors who have to rush from patient to patient and leaving the rest to the nurses. If you get the grades, and its what you want to do - go for it!

scion05
18-02-09, 14:03
I meant money while I'm studying! :ton: The bursary for diploma student nurses when I'm doing mine will be between 7-8K, and no tuition fees. Once I've graduated I wont have to pay any of that back. However, if I do a degree, I get a tiny bursary, and then must take out a student loan, which needs to be paid back afterwards. Do you see what I mean ? :) I'd actually love to be a nurse in Australia once I qualify, and leave hell-hole Britain behind :D

LaraLuvrrr
18-02-09, 18:27
Hate to burst you guys' bubbles, but this type thing is present in any work field, even in general life itself. Everyone gets ordered to spend countless hours handling multiple, stressful tasks. The difference is whether you find those tasks enjoyable or not. You have to decide whether the satisfaction of helping people outweighs the negatives of the work. Apparently it does for some people, and not for others.

Well I agree with that. But I would say the vast majority of people do not like dealing with the nasty things that nurses have to deal with and having to work longer hours then the average worker. I rather be stressed with a project deadline then running around in scrubs cleaning crap and dealing with blood and maybe being in the ER with people dying before my very eyes... thats just me

spikejones
18-02-09, 18:37
they may have a longer work DAY, but they generally have a shorter work WEEK. meaning that they rack up 40 hours in just 3 or 4 days, and have more days off during the week than in other trades. but yeah... seeing people die around you is tough. that's why you need to know before even going into that profession that you will inevitably have a patient die in your arms.

scoopy_loopy
19-02-09, 01:14
I meant money while I'm studying! :ton: The bursary for diploma student nurses when I'm doing mine will be between 7-8K, and no tuition fees. Once I've graduated I wont have to pay any of that back. However, if I do a degree, I get a tiny bursary, and then must take out a student loan, which needs to be paid back afterwards. Do you see what I mean ? :) I'd actually love to be a nurse in Australia once I qualify, and leave hell-hole Britain behind :D

Here in Australia we dont have to pay for any degree's at all... not a cent :D

At least, not until we're earning more than $41,000 a year - then we have to make repayments of like $2k a year, no interest. Its awesome.