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Henhead
19-02-09, 11:00
A 14-year-old girl from Wisconsin has been arrested and charged with disorderly conduct. Her crime? Repeatedly text-messaging during class time at school.

The police report also notes that the girl continually denied that she even had a phone on her person when asked to stop texting in class.

The school then called the police authorities and the officer who responded questioned the girl and interviewed her friends. When the officer tried to contact the girl's parents, "She gave me several numbers all being false by one or two digits wrong. [Redacted] stated I was dialling the wrong numbers so On [sic] speaker phone I dialled the number she gave me and spoke with a subject who stated I had the wrong number."

The girl continued to deny she had a phone until a female officer was called in to search the teen. A Samsung Cricket was found stuffed down the back of the girl's pants.

A court hearing is set for April 20th.

Source - Afterdawn.com (http://www.afterdawn.com/news/archive/17031.cfm)



What is the world coming to, a lot worse is going on around us and the just seems pathetic to me.

Maybe I'll get a knock on the door for writing this :ton:

Paddy
19-02-09, 11:01
A police state much??
Thats ridiculous reason to arrest someone but hardly surprising lol.

Lee croft
19-02-09, 11:04
oh my god they cant do that!! i remember the secondary school (old days) :) i had my phone on me in class the worse that happend to me is they took it of me till the next day because my dad came to my school and asked them to give him the phone then he gave it too me i never got arressted or even questioned!! thank god 6th form is different :D they cant take it off us now!!

interstellardave
19-02-09, 11:05
Well, she WAS disrupting the class and the teachers couldn't very well search her themselves, could they? No-one is learning when their attention is on their phone the entire time--and when class is stopped because they put the phone down their pants and cause a scene like that.

Texting must be a huge problem in schools these days...

Paddy
19-02-09, 11:06
oh my god they cant do that!! i remember the old days :) i had my phone on me in class the worse that happend to me is they took it of me till the next day because my dad came to my school and asked them to give him the phone then he gave it too me i never got arressted or even questioned!! thank god 6th form is different :D

Texting isnt the worst reason Ive heard people get arrested for :p

interstellardave
19-02-09, 11:07
Texting isnt the worst reason Ive heard people get arrested for :p

Obviously she wasn't arrested for texting... it was for refusing to stop and refusing to hand over the phone. Even to the police she denied having a phone and deliberately gave them wrong information when asked for it.

She's a BRAT, face it. :p Kids like her need a wake up call.

Paddy
19-02-09, 11:09
Obviously she wasn't arrested for texting... it was for refusing to stop and refusing to hand over the phone. Even to the police she denied having a phone and deliberately gave them wrong information when asked for it.

She's a BRAT, face it. :p Kids like her need a wake up call.

Haha I know but my point is even if it was for texting I heard of worse reasons to be busted.

Rivendell
19-02-09, 11:11
Wow, way to waste "valuable police time" arresting someone for texting in class.
One word springs to mind, but saying it here would probably cause more hassle than necessary, so it shall stay in my brain.

interstellardave
19-02-09, 11:14
Wow, way to waste "valuable police time" arresting someone for texting in class.
One word springs to mind, but saying it here would probably cause more hassle than necessary, so it shall stay in my brain.

Kids who become empowered by no-one ever telling them they're wrong about anything become criminals. She could have give the phone to the teacher when asked for it and that would have been that.

I would NEVER have defied the cops like that as a 14 year old--even if I thought I was right... would you have? That alone tells me something about her... she's no Ghandi, she's a brat.

Siberian Tiger
19-02-09, 11:17
Oh no, we must unite and catch the rest of the serial texters before it's too late! And while we're at it, let's arrest anyone who repeatedly doesn't do their homework! The school had to call the authorities instead of handling it themselves with their own disciplinary procedures? Sounds like a badly run school. Yes, let's spend time questioning the girl and interviewing her friends whilst more serious crime takes place. That can be dealt with later. :rolleyes:

Rivendell
19-02-09, 11:17
Wow, so you're seriously condoning the arrest of a teenager for *giggles* rebelling by texting in class and refusing to hand over their phone?

:vlol:

Nausinous
19-02-09, 11:22
Why are the police involved in something so petty? The teacher should have taken the mobile phone away and if that failed immediately remove the pupil from the classroom put her in a isolation room with work to complete. If she doesn't complete the work, give her detention until she does focus and do the work.

interstellardave
19-02-09, 11:25
Wow, so you're seriously condoning the arrest of a teenager for *giggles* rebelling by texting in class and refusing to hand over their phone?

:vlol:

She didn't even cooperate with the cops when they came. What should the school have done w/her that people wouldn't have complained about? SHE pushed everyone involved obviously because she feels entitled to do whatever she wants to do. SHE escalated the situation.

Seriously I think I'm the only one who is actually concerned about her... I think it's a lesson she needs.

And there are other kids in the class who might want to learn, btw.


Why are the police involved in something so petty? The teacher should have taken the mobile phone away and if that failed immediately remove the pupil from the classroom put her in a isolation room with work to complete. If she doesn't complete the work, give her detention until she does focus and do the work.


She was too obstinate to even cooperate with the police... the school probably figured that doing as you suggest wouldn't work either. Perhaps putting the onus on the police was a way to avoid litigation on their part?

Henhead
19-02-09, 11:25
Well, she WAS disrupting the class and the teachers couldn't very well search her themselves, could they? No-one is learning when their attention is on their phone the entire time--and when class is stopped because they put the phone down their pants and cause a scene like that.

Texting must be a huge problem in schools these days...

Not saying she was not in the wrong, but why phone the police over something so trivial, sure they have lots more important things to be doing (like eating doughnuts :p )

Why not just remove her from the class?

Siberian Tiger
19-02-09, 11:26
Yeah, that's what I don't get. Misbehaving children in school is nothing new, so why weren't normal school procedures followed to deal with the problem? Whoever made that call to the authorities is a right tool, and I'm sure the police were thrilled about it too.

Rivendell
19-02-09, 11:27
And there are other kids in the class who might want to learn, btw.

So send her out. Send her to the principal. Give her detention. Bring in her parents.

The Police, though? I ask you, seriously? It's blatantly ridiculous to an (almost) unbelievable degree!

Super Badnik
19-02-09, 11:28
It's so the police can meet their targets.
The world is being policed by morons.

marla_biggs
19-02-09, 11:31
lol whatever next..

can't the school handle a problem like this without getting police involved :confused:

interstellardave
19-02-09, 11:31
So send her out. Send her to the principal. Give her detention. Bring in her parents.

The Police, though? I ask you, seriously? It's blatantly ridiculous to an (almost) unbelievable degree!

Well, neither of us was there... if she wasn't even cooperating with the police what chance did school officials have? Do you think they wanted to lay hands on her themselves? Think about what you would do in that situation... I'm sure it's not so crystal clear when you really think about it.

The bottom line is that this all went as far as it did because of the girl. What she did was wrong; she should know it's wrong and she should have relented and given the phone to the teacher.

If she was your child what would you say? I'd say "maybe this will teach you a lesson". I wouldn't defend her in any way--unless someone physically roughed her up.

Mad Tony
19-02-09, 11:32
It's so the police can meet their targets.
The world is being policed by morons.So all police officers are morons? The school were the ones who called the police. I do agree with Dave on this one, she didn't cooperate with them at all.

TR93
19-02-09, 11:33
So send her out. Send her to the principal. Give her detention. Bring in her parents.

The Police, though? I ask you, seriously? It's blatantly ridiculous to an (almost) unbelievable degree!

Couldn't agree more Riv...

In my school if someone is caught with there mobile in their hand during class they have to taken off them and it's sent to the reception, where THE PARENTS have to come up to the school and collect it.
Why arrest someone for having there phone in class...I mean aren't there more serious things the Police could be dealing with!

Most of the time when someone has a phone out in class teacher say "Put the phone away" and t goes away(Except when we are using the phone as a calcuator ect...not for exams!)...Until the teacher isn't looking and the phone come back out of the pocket and someone starts texting again....

I just laugh away when thier phone actually goes off in class though...there is such a thing as putting it on silent!:p

raiderfun
19-02-09, 11:34
Wow, so texting at school becomes a crime now ? :confused:

Rivendell
19-02-09, 11:35
Wow, so texting at school becomes a crime now ? :confused:

Apparently you don't even need to have committed one to be arrested now, frickin' awesome isn't it? :D

mizuno_suisei
19-02-09, 11:36
Thats just ridiculous. Why didnt they just call her parents straight away, surely the school has contact numbers in their records. Instead of calling the cops, they coulda just called her parents and given her detention or even a suspension if they're that cruel xD

Siberian Tiger
19-02-09, 11:37
Let's not forget one of the most farcical parts of the report:

A court hearing is set for April 20th.

:vlol:

ajrich17901
19-02-09, 11:39
I still say cell phones should be banned from school, theres no reason to have one whyll school is in session.

raiderfun
19-02-09, 11:39
Apparently you don't even need to have committed one to be arrested now, frickin' awesome isn't it? :D

Yeah, right. And I wonder what they're going to invent next, perhaps talking with your classmate...:rolleyes:

interstellardave
19-02-09, 11:39
Attitudes like the ones here are why schools are failing...

If your child does this I hope you stand proudly behind them and encourage their behavior because obviously being disruptive, disobeying teachers and then even the police is a good thing. It's very good behavior for a 14 year old... :rolleyes:

ALSO: In reading the responses to the article, someone said that Wisconsin has a state law banning cell phones in schools. If true, there's your ultimate justification for police involvement right there....

Rivendell
19-02-09, 11:46
Attitudes like the ones here are why schools are failing...

If your child does this I hope you stand proudly behind them and encourage their behavior because obviously being disruptive, disobeying teachers and then even the police is a good thing. It's very good behavior for a 14 year old...

I'm still stuggling to comprehend how you can even willingly nod your head and applaud them for even getting the police involved in the first place. :vlol:

What would I have done? I've told you. I'd send them out, or to the 'principal', or even get their parents in.
You say the teacher wouldn't have a chance because she's obviously so 'rebellious'?
She's texting - so obviously she 'doesn't want to study'. What problem would the stuck-up little missy have with leaving the classroom and allowing the others to study? People like her - at least in this country - would willingly take the attention of leaving the classroom.

There's something wrong on a higher level when teachers call in police to do their jobs for them. Then there's something even more wrong when they have to arrest a teenager for texting in class. As ST said - it's farcical.
Should the girl have lied to the police? No.
Should the teacher have done their job properly instead of making a total fuss about something so insignificantly petty? Yes!
Should the teacher have even got the police involved over the matter?

Over a teenage girl, texting? Sending her to court?
Jesus.

Lew
19-02-09, 11:53
Urgh, thank god i'm not in school anymore. This is so pathetic

interstellardave
19-02-09, 11:56
I'm not saying all the right decisions were made here... although I read that possession of a cell phone in Wisconsin schools is a crime. Technically that's your justification right there.

The story doesn't say that they tried to get the girl to leave the class but I'm assuming they did... and the girl probably refused to do so because she also didn't admit to any wrongdoing--or even to having a phone in the first place.

You see, I am tending to err on the side of the adults here... whereas everyone else is tending to err on the side of the kid. You're making as many assumptions as I am, really, I just think that schools get blasted way too much for trying to deal with disruptive kids--it's one of the reasons that kids get away with as much as they do. No-one ever tells them they are wrong about anything! And if "small" things aren't wrong then bigger and bigger things become "not wrong" as well. That tends to happen to some kids as they grow up. I'd rather not see her grow up believing everything she does is okay.

Personally I'll waste some of my tax dollars on sending a strong message (even if it was a bit much) to kids like that--kids who are that obstinate--rather than waste even more dollars on paying for an education system where teachers are put in the worst possible situations to the point where they cannot teach.

Ikas90
19-02-09, 12:27
Over the top, much?

Reminds me of Hard Justice. Guy goes to jail for downloading three music tracks.

Umm, remind me to bomb Wisconsin while on my quest to take over the world, K? K.

Hermina94
19-02-09, 12:32
thats just silly...I almost always text someone on class so..

violentblossom
19-02-09, 12:41
buffoonery, at its apparent best.

poor girl..

"Have you ever been arrested?"

"Pff, yeah.. sucked"

"Dude, no way! What for?"

"Texting in class."

"What, to get test answers or something?"

"No, just for texting."

"Dude." *blank stare with mouth slightly agape*

"Wisconsin's hardcore."

Phlip
19-02-09, 12:43
This is extremely :rolleyes: and http://i212.photobucket.com/albums/cc80/Phlip_03/Icons%20and%20Smileys/indifferentgrey.png-worthy.

Mr.Burns
19-02-09, 13:05
Dave, I'm 100% with you on this. In the US, it is an arrestable offense to interfere with a police investigation and lying to an officer. Something that this girl did. Now could they have suspended her? Sure. Could they have expelled her? Sure. Now what would have those accomplished? Nothing. She wouldn't have learned a lesson and would have cost her an education and possible her future.

She could have enacted her Fifth Amendment rights (if she actually knew what they were), but she didn't. Instead she chose to lie to the police, obstructing their investigation of the complaint and was found to be lying. If someone called in a complaint about me making noise and calls the cops, I could either:

A. tell them the truth and apologize to my neighbor.
B. Utilize my Fifth Amendment rights.
C. Lie.

Now with situation A, I would have gotten off with just a warning and that's it. B, would most likely end up with my being arrested since I'm still refusing to cooperate with a police officer, but this isn't always the case. Situation C, would most likely have resulted (depending on the severity) in my arrest for interfering with a police investigation. Odds are I would spend the night in jail, get a fine and a slap on the wrist. This is more than likely what will happen to this girl since the offense is minor.


The key thing here people is this: She could have enacted her Fifth Amendment rights, thereby protecting her from self incrimination. Odds are it didn't occur to her and chose to lie again, not thinking that the cops would be persistent. She had a choice. Now she has to live with those consequences.

interstellardave
19-02-09, 13:15
Thanks for the backup, Mr. B! :tmb:

The whole thing of it is that I'm sure no-one wanted it to go as far as it did. The teachers didn't call the cops immediately, they tried to get the girl to stop, and to give up the phone. She didn't even admit to having a phone, though. She was obstinate.

Then the cops came in--again, we should assume this was a last resort unless we know otherwise--and merely tried to talk to to her. Then tried to contact her parents but she kept telling them wrong phone numbers. And she lied to them about having the phone too. She was obstinate even then.

So, then they searched her, found the phone, possession of which in Wisconsin schools is a crime (I have heard), so they basically had to take her in at that point.

It's obvious to me that no-one involved wanted it to go that far; she could have relented at any point--even when the female officer was called to search her she could have, and maybe then they wouldn't have taken her in. She kinda gave them few, if any, other options.

Mr.Burns
19-02-09, 13:18
No problem amigo :)

True, but like I said, if the schools these days really started teaching the Bill of Rights, in detail, at a young age, she would have remembered the Fifth Amendment and enacted it. If she wasn't going to tell the truth, that would have been the way to go. Of course most people seem to think that lying is the easier way out but don't realize that it never is. Her fault. Her choice.

Wolf Angel
19-02-09, 13:20
thats just silly...I almost always text someone on class so..

Completely agree with you there. I don't think I've ever texted in class but my friends do it all the time - but someone getting arrested because they only were texting in class!?I think that is so ridiculous, and I just hate it when people get so worked up over nothing - it's like, "Dude, will you just chill?" If someone is caught texting in my school then they get their phone taken off them for a week or something. The school was really overreacting when they contacted the police, and I think a suspension or getting expelled is also silly, just because she was texting in class. In my school, seeing someone texting is an everyday normal thing (or you'd sometimes see them texting the odd time) but we wouldn't even get detention for something like that.

interstellardave
19-02-09, 13:25
No problem amigo :)

True, but like I said, if the schools these days really started teaching the Bill of Rights, in detail, at a young age, she would have remembered the Fifth Amendment and enacted it. If she wasn't going to tell the truth, that would have been the way to go. Of course most people seem to think that lying is the easier way out but don't realize that it never is. Her fault. Her choice.

She was busy texting when they covered that in class! :cln:

viper456
19-02-09, 13:28
I think its a silly reason but tbh I can picture her sat there being a cocky ***** texting and being a complete arse about it and just disrupting the whole class etc. Obviously I don't know the full story since I wasn't there but I can honestly imagine it going down like that.

Mr.Burns
19-02-09, 13:32
She was busy texting when they covered that in class! :cln:

:yik: Never! Blasphemy!

irjudd
19-02-09, 14:12
My niece texts me while she's in class all the time. Gosh when will these other kids learn that you have to be sneaky about these things :rolleyes:

Lenochka
19-02-09, 14:25
A bit extreme but whatev, little ***** wasn't cooperating so she got what was coming to her xD

sheepydee
19-02-09, 15:25
i always text ppl when im in class =S but i never been caught haha

Fallen.Angel
19-02-09, 15:45
She should've been honest. =S It wouldn't have turned ugly. She kinda pushed it on herself by lying but in a way, I do understand that some people do it out of fear. She should have just been sent out of the classroom. I think calling the police was a little too drastic. IMO of course.

Voni
19-02-09, 16:50
I find the whole thing a bit strange, but we don't know the whole story. She could be a serial disrupter and a total nightmare to teach, for all I know. Yes, she needed to be taught a lesson, but the police are not the way to go about it. It's not the police's job to teach the little madam some manners, that's the job of her parents who clearly failed at that, hmm? Bloody hell.

irjudd
19-02-09, 16:53
I find the whole thing a bit strange, but we don't know the whole story. She could be a serial disrupter and a total nightmare to teach, for all I know. Yes, she needed to be taught a lesson, but the police are not the way to go about it. It's not the police's job to teach the little madam some manners, that's the job of her parents who clearly failed at that, hmm? Bloody hell.
You raise a good point. Perhaps this isn't the angle you were coming from, but I think it was a bit irresponsible to call the Police, as they have much more pressing matters they could have been dealing with. Instead, they were dealing with some brat with a cell phone.

Angelx14
19-02-09, 16:59
:rolleyes:

Laurencarter
19-02-09, 17:05
wow. At my school if they catch you with a phone during school hours all they do is they confiscate it for 30 days and after that you get it back.

Goose
19-02-09, 17:15
If she's willing to argue with a police officer to the point that they need to call on a woman to search her, i think she's more then capable of making a truly annoying scene when the teacher asked her to stop texting.

interstellardave
19-02-09, 17:17
If she's willing to argue with a police officer to the point that they need to call on a woman to search her, i think she's more then capable of making a truly annoying scene when the teacher asked her to stop texting.

Thank. You. ;) People just don't seem to be reading the whole story... and grasping what it really means about the kind of girl this is. She's no Mary Poppins, that's clear. :p

Changeling
19-02-09, 17:21
Wasting valuable police time much?

Seriously, that's insane. I've seen a lot of people text in class the whole time, heck, even I do it sometimes, but it's not like texting a few times in class is going to drastically alter my education to the point where I'm going to have no job, no qualifications and end up being homeless.

They could've just sent her out the class, if she was apparantly disrupting the class by texting then what did they think getting the police involved was going to do!? Obviously people are gonna be restless if something like that happens!

Goose
19-02-09, 17:32
They could've just sent her out the class, if she was apparantly disrupting the class by texting then what did they think getting the police involved was going to do!? Obviously people are gonna be restless if something like that happens!

Why do you think that wasnt already tried? Think about it, you have the teacher, who you say over-reacted, which is somthing people can do. Then the police officer turns up, surely he would see she was over reacting and say so, then a third officer turns up, and she to plays along with this big 'over reaction'.

Chances are she tried getting rid of the child, having 'a word' with the child, and all manner of things, but the child must have thought she new best and new her rights and tried to stay put to impress her classmates. Thats more then likely.

Siberian Tiger
19-02-09, 17:36
Thank. You. ;) People just don't seem to be reading the whole story... and grasping what it really means about the kind of girl this is. She's no Mary Poppins, that's clear. :p

Come off your high horse already. Just because some people disagree with you doesn't mean they aren't reading the entire story. Doesn't mean it has not been grasped. She's evidently not well behaved but there are problem students in every school across the entire world - some I'm sure causing problems much more serious than texting in class. Schools have procedures in place for dealing with problem students which should be a joint effort between the school and the parents. Not the police. Sure, if the student is vandalising, assaulting, is an arsonist etc... yeah, go ahead and call the police. Wasting police time. :rolleyes:


You raise a good point. Perhaps this isn't the angle you were coming from, but I think it was a bit irresponsible to call the Police, as they have much more pressing matters they could have been dealing with. Instead, they were dealing with some brat with a cell phone.

This.

Changeling
19-02-09, 17:39
Why do you think that wasnt already tried?

Why do you think that it was already tried? It may be more than likely, but we don't know if that's actually what happened. How do we know that the teacher tried to do all those things? We don't, and won't until we hear the full story. We're only guessing, from the information that we know of so far, none of us are right in our assumptions.

Goose
19-02-09, 17:39
Come off your high horse already. Just because some people disagree with you doesn't mean they aren't reading the entire story. Doesn't mean it has not been grasped. She's evidently not well behaved but there are problem students in every school across the entire world - some I'm sure causing problems much more serious than texting in class. Schools have procedures in place for dealing with problem students which should be a joint effort between the school and the parents. Not the police. Sure, if the student is vandalising, assaulting, is an arsonist etc... yeah, go ahead and call the police. Wasting police time. :rolleyes:

Whos to say the teacher hasn't tried all the usual channels? Police officers hate people who waste there time, they must have seen some merit to the teachers complaint when they arrived.

Besides i doubt it was the state police and national guard packed out with riot trucks, would have been local patrol car doing the rounds, or having coffee.

Changeling
19-02-09, 17:44
Whos to say the teacher hasn't tried all the usual channels?

And as I said before, who's to say the teacher has tried all the usual channels?


Besides i doubt it was the state police and national guard packed out with riot trucks, would have been local patrol car doing the rounds, or having coffee.

Regardless of the police force, it's still wasting time in my opinion.

jackles
19-02-09, 17:45
Well as someone who works in a school.... ;) actually I was wondering is this one of the schools that have police on tap so as to speak? If the school was one of those that have a high level of agression or other activities that happen then maybe it was a situation that escalated way out of hand. Part of me is rather amused at imaging call in the cops the next time someone annoys me at work..the other part wonders what else has occurred that we know nothing else about.

Siberian Tiger
19-02-09, 17:49
All we've got is the article, so of course there will be many details we'll never know and we can talk about what ifs all night, but sure who's to say they have or haven't tried all the procedures? Who's to say the school did or did not exaggerate the problem? Going from the article - for me - because there is no mention of prior problems with the girl (doesn't mean there aren't any prior problems) I'm sticking to my opinion that calling the police was unnecessary. :)

interstellardave
19-02-09, 17:51
Come off your high horse already. Just because some people disagree with you doesn't mean they aren't reading the entire story. Doesn't mean it has not been grasped. She's evidently not well behaved but there are problem students in every school across the entire world - some I'm sure causing problems much more serious than texting in class. Schools have procedures in place for dealing with problem students which should be a joint effort between the school and the parents. Not the police. Sure, if the student is vandalising, assaulting, is an arsonist etc... yeah, go ahead and call the police. Wasting police time. :rolleyes:

I didn't mean to imply that everyone isn't reading the whole story... but anyone who says she was "arrested for texting" either didn't read the story or didn't comprehend it... because no-one gets arrested just for texting. If that's all a lot of people (not everyone) are going to focus on then what do you want me to think?

If you spit on the sidewalk and a cop sees it and tries to write you a fine and you verbally fight with the officer and then try to run away, and you get arrested.... what were you arrested for. Spitting? No, you weren't arrested for spitting... that's the analogy here.

Note, also, that I didn't use language in an accusatory way towards anyone personally... I'd ask you to please not do it to me in the future. ;)

Changeling
19-02-09, 18:01
All we've got is the article, so of course there will be many details we'll never know and we can talk about what ifs all night, but sure who's to say they have or haven't tried all the procedures? Who's to say the school did or did not exaggerate the problem? Going from the article - for me - because there is no mention of prior problems with the girl (doesn't mean there aren't any prior problems) I'm sticking to my opinion that calling the police was unnecessary. :)

Preciesly :tmb: I completely agree.

Rai
19-02-09, 18:09
Makes me wonder at the competence of the teacher involved or even the school when they can't even deal with a 14 year old girl who is simply refusing to hand over her phone. Giver her detention or get the parents involved, but calling the police was completely unnecessary. I'd have thought the teacher who made the call would have got a warning for wasting police time.

It is probable that the girl wasn't arrested for the act of texting but rather for refusing to cooperate with the police. But the police shouldn't have been involved in the first place. Was the girl getting aggressive or violent when asked to hand her phone over? Or was she simply being obstinate. It's laughable that the school couldn't handle the situation.

:rolleyes:

spikejones
19-02-09, 18:09
No, you weren't arrested for spitting... that's the analogy here.


I can see the point in that. I'd assume her true charge will be something along the lines of interfering with an investigation, obstruction of justice, resisting a police officer, or something along those lines.

as to why the school felt it necessary to call the "cops" over an issue with text messaging, is debatable. One could argue that it is a waste of "valuable police time". On the other hand it could be argued that she was distracting other students from learning.

now, in some schools it is against policy to use a phone or other electronic device (calculators aside) during the course of the school day, regardless of whether you are in class or not. Other schools will be more lenient and allow a student to step in the hallway to use a phone.

my views though... school is a place where you are supposed to be getting an education. not a place for texting away on your cell phone. I don't see as how any teenager really has a reason to have a cell phone until they get a car. And in that case, it should be for emergency purposes ONLY. Therefore these kids should be using something like a pre-paid tracfone that they can use to call their parents and say "hey, my car just broke down and I need help" or w/e. That was the only reason I was ever allowed to get a cell phone when I turned 16. And I had to pay for it all on my own from my part time job at Applebee's. Kids these days are getting things handed to them that they take for granted and don't realize that it costs money to pay for. My niece ran up my sister's phone bill TWICE now, and has lost her phone as a result. First time was for running up minutes on the family share plan by making excessively long - long distance calls, and the second time for texting.

People seem not to respect things until they get slapped around a few times for abusing it. I commend the school for what they did.

interstellardave
19-02-09, 18:18
^^^ I agree, spikejones!

Also, I apologize if I got carried away and really bothered anyone with some of my comments. I've said enough on this particular issue, so I won't repeat all that again.

I guess the real bigger issue here is what should schools be allowed to do in dealing with kids? How much input should parents have? What kind of oversight should there be in disputes between parents and the schools... 'cause I know that teachers' hands really are tied if push comes to shove. Every single thing they do or say could have legal ramifications--and that's been proven many times over. Still, they have to be allowed to do something. And if those things don't work and parents aren't helping then is police involvement prudent? These are important issues that won't be solved here... but it's what really needs to be talked about.

Candee Sparks
19-02-09, 18:25
Oh my gosh, that's terrible but I couldn't help but laugh! :vlol:

Texting is so extreme in my school that teachers actually let us text during class as well as call people if we need to by just stepping in the hallways. They figure that they can't just take phones away from people and actually taking them away causes major disruption and as it turns out, we all focus better with being able to have the freedom to use our phone.

spikejones
19-02-09, 18:40
I find the whole thing a bit strange, but we don't know the whole story. She could be a serial disrupter and a total nightmare to teach, for all I know. Yes, she needed to be taught a lesson, but the police are not the way to go about it. It's not the police's job to teach the little madam some manners, that's the job of her parents who clearly failed at that, hmm? Bloody hell.
does it not take a village to raise a child?
where the school fails to educate, and the parents fail to raise, the state attempts to reform. It is by far not a perfect system as not all will reform right away, but coming from my own background... it works in time. in the end though, it is up to the individual whether they will continue to rebel, or if they will "conform" in a decent, non disruptive manner.
^^^ I agree, spikejones!

Also, I apologize if I got carried away and really bothered anyone with some of my comments. I've said enough on this particular issue, so I won't repeat all that again.

I guess the real bigger issue here is what should schools be allowed to do in dealing with kids? How much input should parents have? What kind of oversight should there be in disputes between parents and the schools... 'cause I know that teachers' hands really are tied if push comes to shove. Every single thing they do or say could have legal ramifications--and that's been proven many times over. Still, they have to be allowed to do something. And if those things don't work and parents aren't helping then is police involvement prudent? These are important issues that won't be solved here... but it's what really needs to be talked about.
well, schools used to be able to paddle their students when they got out of line, but eventually this was outlawed as it was viewed as being cruel and abusive. but I guarantee you that if the student was dragged down to the paddling room and received a proper whooping for disrupting the class, she would think twice about being so brazen again. and teachers don't have a right to search student's either. so really the school is very powerless in this situation. The student could be sent out of the room time and time again when exhibiting this behavior, but ultimately what good would it do for that person? To simply know that if she is doing something against policy, all she must do is to go to a different room to do it? that doesn't teach anyone a lesson in responsibility.
Oh my gosh, that's terrible but I couldn't help but laugh! :vlol:

Texting is so extreme in my school that teachers actually let us text during class as well as call people if we need to by just stepping in the hallways. They figure that they can't just take phones away from people and actually taking them away causes major disruption and as it turns out, we all focus better with being able to have the freedom to use our phone.
bull malarky!! if you are so concentrated on sending text messages around the room, you can not possibly be concentrated on learning. I once had my gameboy taken from me in class as a kid, never to receive it back until the end of the semester. Made me not want to do it again. Did my parents run out there and complain about some sort of lost investment when I came home and cried about it? absolutely not! they knew it was a good thing for me in the long run to know that if I step out of line, there are consequences to be paid.

Assassino
19-02-09, 20:26
I should be doing time for life then lol. :p

EternoD
19-02-09, 20:34
LOLOL that's awesome. way to go chick. i never understood why kids just can't pay attention in class like i do....

Lew
19-02-09, 20:52
bull malarky!! if you are so concentrated on sending text messages around the room, you can not possibly be concentrated on learning. I once had my gameboy taken from me in class as a kid, never to receive it back until the end of the semester. Made me not want to do it again. Did my parents run out there and complain about some sort of lost investment when I came home and cried about it? absolutely not! they knew it was a good thing for me in the long run to know that if I step out of line, there are consequences to be paid.

They can't exactly take ones phone of them for a whole semester, what if that person was in a crash and couldn't call anyone because some sad ass teacher took it off them. At college were allowed to text to make phone calls(as long as in corridor) and no one complains, but then again at college you mature abit more at 16....

matrix54
19-02-09, 20:52
the most she should've gotten was detention. in school suspention max.

Tihocan9
19-02-09, 21:09
I think detention or maybe suspension for repeated lying and offenses but not arrested thats a bit to far but hey maybe she'll learn a lesson to listen to her elders after this, in the end it may be good for her.

Mr.Burns
19-02-09, 21:09
Keep the spam out of here folks. Thank you.

Rachel Croft
19-02-09, 21:14
This reminds me of when I accidentally said the F word, and they sent me to detention for three days, calling it, "Dissorderly conduct." So rediculous.

TRhalloween
19-02-09, 21:18
Keep the spam out of here folks. Thank you.

K whatevs!!! OMG :p

I hate when they think they're unresponsive and lie their way out. God, just put away the phone! The fact that she denied having a phone was ridiculous.

This reminds me of when I accidentally said the F word, and they sent me to detention for three days, calling it, "Dissorderly conduct." So rediculous.

If you swear in my school the teacher is like "Hey, language!" and if you keep running your mouth and swearing you get a detention or something. Dunno. I'm well behaved :ton:

Rai
19-02-09, 21:23
I think detention or maybe suspension for repeated lying and offenses but not arrested thats a bit to far but hey maybe she'll learn a lesson to listen to her elders after this, in the end it may be good for her.

This girl is facing criminal charges and having to go to court. I think there could have been other ways for her to learn a lesson about listening to her elders. She shouldn't have refused to cooperate with the police, but the police should not have been involved to begin with and it certainly shouldn't have gone as far as arresting her. A warning would have been more than enough.

Tihocan9
19-02-09, 21:23
K whatevs!!! OMG :p

I hate when they think they're unresponsive and lie their way out. God, just put away the phone! The fact that she denied having a phone was ridiculous.



If you swear in my school the teacher is like "Hey, language!" and if you keep running your mouth and swearing you get a detention or something. Dunno. I'm well behaved :ton:

And it give people without a phone a hard time, like me, I have no cell phone and multiple times I have been yelled at to put my phone away because a teacher thought I was secretly texting when obviously i wasn't...I couldn't have been. I guess it all depends on the teacher though, many can be strict and controlling yet fun and nice some are strict and mean others are fun but irresponsible, but I can understand that it must be difficult to control a bunch of teenagers and children.

This girl is facing criminal charges and having to go to court. I think there could have been other ways for her to learn a lesson about listening to her elders. She shouldn't have refused to cooperate with the police, but the police should not have been involved to begin with and it certainly shouldn't have gone as far as arresting her. A warning would have been more than enough.

I agree, I mean I believe in harsh punishments (not cruel or mean but one that teaches a lesson) and I think a suspension for disobeying and lying multiple times could have been much better. If the police were brought in just to scare her then it would be fine but taking her to court, I wonder if they will be able to press any charges and actually find her guilty, unless that is its something like Disobeying an Officer.

God Horus
19-02-09, 22:03
:vlol:

Totally out of line.

oocladableeblah
19-02-09, 22:29
If we get caught using a phone in class the teachers just tell you to put it away. They are supposed to take it to the office and then your parents have to pick it up, but the teachers don't care enough. If you really bug them with the phone though then the teachers will usually just hold onto the phone till the end of the period.

This is ridiculous, the student should have put away the phone and not deny she had one. I mean what is the point in arguing over it all she has to do is put it away and then wait a little bit then take it out again :p (yes I know she shouldn't even text period, but if she has to it would have been 10x easier doing that then arguing with the teacher).
The police didn't need involvement and the teacher should have just given the student a detention or something.

Biddy
19-02-09, 22:31
Serves her right.

erosan
19-02-09, 22:36
It honestly ****es me off that the police waste their time on stupid crap like this, instead of going after the REAL trouble makers.

Gladous
19-02-09, 22:49
Last Wednesday, a kid at my school had a gun with no ammo and starting showing everyone and he got arrested.

I was on the news for it! :vlol:

spikejones
19-02-09, 22:50
They can't exactly take ones phone of them for a whole semester, what if that person was in a crash and couldn't call anyone because some sad ass teacher took it off them. At college were allowed to text to make phone calls(as long as in corridor) and no one complains, but then again at college you mature abit more at 16....
if it is against school policy to have ones phone in use during class, then one cannot simply use the phone during class!

as for your second argument of "what if they were in a crash"... how did people get along before the advent of cellphones? argument invalid...
next please..
sure you would generally be more mature in college, but this girl is only 14, and doesn't have a car.

i can understand if you were making a point about how things are in a college setting, but this is not a college class ;)

silver_wolf
19-02-09, 23:00
meh. texting is stupid anyway.

Paddy
19-02-09, 23:01
So send her out. Send her to the principal. Give her detention. Bring in her parents.

The Police, though? I ask you, seriously? It's blatantly ridiculous to an (almost) unbelievable degree!

Its made out to be more dramatic this case then it really is.

TRfan9294
19-02-09, 23:05
So send her out. Send her to the principal. Give her detention. Bring in her parents.

The Police, though? I ask you, seriously? It's blatantly ridiculous to an (almost) unbelievable degree!

I agree:tmb:, there was no need to arrest her.

Smog
19-02-09, 23:45
as for your second argument of "what if they were in a crash"... how did people get along before the advent of cellphones? argument invalid...

How did people get along before the advent of seat belts? Or Penicillin? ;)

Anyway, this is ever so slightly pathetic. Arresting a girl for using her phone in class? Is Wisconsin a Communist State or something? :pi:

Atlantean-Squid
20-02-09, 00:07
Serves her right. Bloody brat.

spikejones
20-02-09, 00:13
no... wrong side of the Atlantic (or Pacific if you live on the West Coast of America) anyhow...

she was not arrested for "texting" as we have been trying to point out. That may be what the article or just the thread is titled to be.. but that is not a crime. or is it?

I think someone pointed out that possession of a cellphone (by a student) on Wisconsin school grounds is against policy (not sure of the law though). the student was in direct violation of school policy, disregarded the teachers multiple requests to quit doing it, denied having done it, the situation escalated to a point where the teacher found it necessary to call in another employee of the state (yes folks... schools and police are both funded and run by the state!) to handle the situation, the student continued to deny having done it, evaded and obstructed the police officer's questioning and investigation ( a crime in itself !! ) and was found to actually be in possession of a cell phone when the female officer was brought in to search her ( violation of school policy has now been proven ).

when facts trump whining, you cannot deny - the girl has broken the law!
is it so far fetched for a police officer to be on school grounds? I don't think so... maybe the reporters are blowing it a bit out of proportion. Fourteen years old would place her in high school (unless she has been held back a few years). Both of the high schools that I attended had a resident police officer on duty to keep the peace. So perhaps there was no "calling the authorities" necessary - save to phone up the guy sitting in an office down the hall ;)

ben croft
20-02-09, 00:14
Well, that's the best policemen can do. They're not capable enough to face real crimes. Their intelligence wouldn't allow such a thing.

:wve:

spikejones
20-02-09, 00:18
eh?

that's a pretty judgmental statement there ben croft.
what makes you so certain that police are not intelligent? or rather that their intelligence wont allow them to face "real" crime?

Rai
20-02-09, 00:40
no... wrong side of the Atlantic (or Pacific if you live on the West Coast of America) anyhow...

she was not arrested for "texting" as we have been trying to point out. That may be what the article or just the thread is titled to be.. but that is not a crime. or is it?

I think someone pointed out that possession of a cellphone (by a student) on Wisconsin school grounds is against policy (not sure of the law though). the student was in direct violation of school policy, disregarded the teachers multiple requests to quit doing it, denied having done it, the situation escalated to a point where the teacher found it necessary to call in another employee of the state (yes folks... schools and police are both funded and run by the state!) to handle the situation, the student continued to deny having done it, evaded and obstructed the police officer's questioning and investigation ( a crime in itself !! ) and was found to actually be in possession of a cell phone when the female officer was brought in to search her ( violation of school policy has now been proven ).

when facts trump whining, you cannot deny - the girl has broken the law!
is it so far fetched for a police officer to be on school grounds? I don't think so... maybe the reporters are blowing it a bit out of proportion. Fourteen years old would place her in high school (unless she has been held back a few years). Both of the high schools that I attended had a resident police officer on duty to keep the peace. So perhaps there was no "calling the authorities" necessary - save to phone up the guy sitting in an office down the hall ;)

Well, I figured that she wasn't arrested for texting, but rather she refused to cooperate with the police. But: How did it escalate to such a point that the police were called in the first place, (whether from just another part of the school or otherwise). I dunno what procedures would have to take place, but I would expect a teacher to be able to handle a situation like this. Maybe the Head was called in or the parents as well if the class teacher was struggling to get anywhere with the girl. Is this one 14 year old really so difficult that they resorted to the police? No where in that article does it say the girl was aggressive and violent, which would be grounds to call the police. Violation of school policy isn't breaking the law in itself. If having a mobile in school is against the law, then that is slightly different circumstances, but still a tad overboard, imo, but who am I to argue over the law?

I can't help but imagine a girl just stood in the hall, playing mute while a group of adults surround her all scratching their heads. :whi:

But really? There are schools where there are police resident on school grounds? Wow, that is rather scary a thought, that this service is even needed. :yik:

Tombreaper
20-02-09, 00:43
It's all about discipline, texting during school is not allowed, so....

spikejones
20-02-09, 03:02
to be honest with you Rai, some inner city schools NEED to have police officers on the grounds to prevent, or rather to break up, gang violence. But... as you may not know, reporters tend to lay heavily to one side and not show the other, in order to make something sound more ridiculous. Note that the article, and another just like it on fox, point the finger of blame at the school as well as the police - while merely grazing over the fact that what she was doing was wrong. she may have been out of line to the point where the teacher felt it necessary to call in the police. But who do you think notified reporters of the event? Was it the school, or the girl and her family/friends?

why just today I could have disregarded a shop-keeper's request to remove my backpack and leave it at the front counter. I told him that I had been in there the past few days with my backpack and that no one had said anything about it. He informed me that it was a new regulation from the manager (as if the manager think a backpack will make me steal :confused: ).

at this point I could do one of several things:

A) comply with his request
B) disregard his request
C) leave

I chose the latter out of my own personal reasons -- I am sick of people thinking I am going to steal just because I have a backpack. I wear it to carry my job hunting supplies. Since I ride a bike around everywhere, I have not a trunk in which to put that stuff. Besides... do they ask a woman to leave her purse at the counter? Items can just as easily be stole in one of those. And for that matter, why not tell me to take my clothes off? I can slip a can of red bull in my pocket when no one is looking. We should from now on be required to remove our clothing upon entering an establishment that does not belong to us. Never again will people be able to sneak items out of a store, or hide a cell phone in their pants during class.

anyhoo..
Had I disregarded his request due to my mentioned logic above, he most certainly would have called the police on me. he certainly had no right to put his hands on me in attempts to remove me from the store. nor did he have a right to take my bag from me. that would be theft in itself. So the police would come and cart me off to jail for some obscure charge. But at least in my case I would have been making a valid point, whereas she was not.

Tony9595
20-02-09, 03:06
thatīs what she gets for lying :ton:

but seriously, thatīs sick! I mean, how can you get arrested for that, many people do that even on the church! haha how is this possible? :D

Mr.Burns
20-02-09, 03:14
Perhaps Tony if you read the full article, you would have seen that she was arrested for refusing to cooperate with a police officer, hindering an investigation and lying to an officer. THOSE are arrestable offenses. Not texting.

Draco
20-02-09, 03:42
I think everyone who texts in class should be arrested. Those are MY taxpayer dollars the brats are wasting.

spikejones
20-02-09, 03:43
Perhaps Tony if you read the full article, you would have seen that she was arrested for refusing to cooperate with a police officer, hindering an investigation and lying to an officer. THOSE are arrestable offenses. Not texting.

thatīs what she gets for lying :ton:

but seriously, thatīs sick! I mean, how can you get arrested for that, many people do that even on the church! haha how is this possible? :D
and perhaps if you'd paid attention in school....
I surely hope they weren't sitting on the church making a text message, they may slip, fall, and break their neck. Or drop it in dog poo like the LP did. that would be lesson enough for those people.

Little-Lara
20-02-09, 03:47
Well you know, teachers have their hands full taking care of hundreds of kids in one whole day. The last thing they need is one of them acting up. Tough times call for tough measures. :rolleyes: Parents i know can't even handle ONE kid.

EmeraldFields
20-02-09, 03:50
While what she did to the police was stupid, they shouldn't have been called in the first place.

I've known plenty of kids who have done the same thing and all they get is a detention. Police should've only been called if she had a weapon or made threats.

MattTR
20-02-09, 03:50
Wow.. Arrested? Leave the girl around, people need to find something better to do with their time and there's a lot more worse things to worry about then a 14 year old texting in class.. :rolleyes:

*sigh* What is this world coming to?

Ward Dragon
20-02-09, 03:52
to be honest with you Rai, some inner city schools NEED to have police officers on the grounds to prevent, or rather to break up, gang violence.

Not just inner city schools. I live in the suburbs and my high school always had a police officer on duty. It was great. There really wasn't that much violence in the school itself (just don't go to the 7-11 parking lot across the street XD). Meanwhile there were other schools in the county which were considered "better" due to having mostly little rich kids going there. These schools did not have police officers and there were some serious cases of students being sent to the hospital as a result of getting jumped on school grounds. I like having a police presence in schools. I think it's much safer.

spikejones
20-02-09, 03:52
*sigh* What is this world coming to?
apparently a world that condones children disobeying authority :rolleyes:
Not just inner city schools. I live in the suburbs and my high school always had a police officer on duty. It was great. There really wasn't that much violence in the school itself (just don't go to the 7-11 parking lot across the street XD). Meanwhile there were other schools in the county which were considered "better" due to having mostly little rich kids going there. These schools did not have police officers and there were some serious cases of students being sent to the hospital as a result of getting jumped. I like having a police presence in schools. I think it's much safer.
that was just a prime example though. my two high schools weren't "inner city". One of them - Broughton High School (http://broughton.wcpss.net/) - was on the border of downtown Raleigh, and the other - Croatan High School (http://www.carteretcountyschools.org/chs/) - was in the middle of BFE by comparison to Broughton.

I got arrested the last month of my Junior Year at Croatan for possession of a pipe. Got pulled out of class and had my locker searched by the sheriff, who was our resident police officer. regardless of the fact that it had not been used for pot, I was charged with possession of drug paraphernalia. :hea:. stupid jealous kid ratted on me for a pay off since I didn't sell it to him. *******. but... that is what you get for breaking the school policy. while I was doing nothing disruptive, the item was technically a drug pipe and that kind of stuff is not allowed in school.

Jo269976
20-02-09, 04:07
Agreed that it was against the rules for her to be doing it and she shouldn't have acted the way she did. But over a phone this is ridiculous, something far more serious could be going on rather than a few SMS's being sent across a school.

spikejones
20-02-09, 04:22
she could have been orchestrating a drug deal or some sort of hate crime against another student. you never know what those spiteful little children may be doing.

EmeraldFields
20-02-09, 04:25
she could have been orchestrating a drug deal or some sort of hate crime against another student. you never know what those spiteful little children may be doing.

A little optimism would'nt hurt...:)

spikejones
20-02-09, 04:43
was just pointing out that everyone just assumes from the "ridiculousness" of the situation, that she was simply texting a friend. Shouldn't her friends be in class as well?

EmeraldFields
20-02-09, 04:48
They probably are in class. Not a day goes by that I don't go to school and see at least six people in each class texting.

Ward Dragon
20-02-09, 06:35
that was just a prime example though.

Right, I was trying to give supporting evidence that your statement applied to all types of schools :)

I was charged with possession of drug paraphernalia. :hea:.

I didn't even know that law existed until I read a few posts mentioning it on this forum. I'll have to be careful not to bring home any lab equipment from my classes :eek:

dox online
20-02-09, 07:14
I'd hardly bother the head teacher with something like that, the teacher should be arrested for wasting the police's time!

LaraCroftRox
20-02-09, 09:55
How sad. Arrested for texting? :confused:

Ward Dragon
20-02-09, 09:58
How sad. Arrested for texting? :confused:

The article's title is a little bit misleading. The girl was not arrested for texting itself. What happened is that she was texting during class and gave the teacher trouble when the teacher asked her to stop. She hid the phone down her pants and refused to admit that she had it. Apparently she was disruptive to the class and the teacher didn't want to deal with it, so a police officer was brought in to settle the matter. The girl continued to be defiant and refused to give the police officer a correct phone number for her parents. She still denied having the phone until a female police officer searched her and found it. She was charged with disorderly conduct for giving the police trouble.

Larapink
20-02-09, 10:14
This is ridiculous just for texting, instead of all the trouble of an arreset why not just take the phone away. I used to have that warning in school if I was caught using my phone during classes I would have it taken away for the rest of the day well that was in school...

Ward Dragon
20-02-09, 10:18
This is ridiculous just for texting, instead of all the trouble of an arreset why not just take the phone away.

Because she stuffed the phone down her pants and then claimed she never had one.

LaraCroftRox
20-02-09, 10:34
The article's title is a little bit misleading. The girl was not arrested for texting itself. What happened is that she was texting during class and gave the teacher trouble when the teacher asked her to stop. She hid the phone down her pants and refused to admit that she had it. Apparently she was disruptive to the class and the teacher didn't want to deal with it, so a police officer was brought in to settle the matter. The girl continued to be defiant and refused to give the police officer a correct phone number for her parents. She still denied having the phone until a female police officer searched her and found it. She was charged with disorderly conduct for giving the police trouble.


Ah, I see what you mean, for screwing the police over....but still it's a tad extreme IMO.

Larapink
20-02-09, 10:36
Because she stuffed the phone down her pants and then claimed she never had one.
But still it doesn't warrant an arrest.

She should have been given a detention instead.

aileenwuornos
20-02-09, 10:40
Wow, way to waste "valuable police time" arresting someone for texting in class.
One word springs to mind, but saying it here would probably cause more hassle than necessary, so it shall stay in my brain.

I'm still stuggling to comprehend how you can even willingly nod your head and applaud them for even getting the police involved in the first place. :vlol:

What would I have done? I've told you. I'd send them out, or to the 'principal', or even get their parents in.
You say the teacher wouldn't have a chance because she's obviously so 'rebellious'?
She's texting - so obviously she 'doesn't want to study'. What problem would the stuck-up little missy have with leaving the classroom and allowing the others to study? People like her - at least in this country - would willingly take the attention of leaving the classroom.

There's something wrong on a higher level when teachers call in police to do their jobs for them. Then there's something even more wrong when they have to arrest a teenager for texting in class. As ST said - it's farcical.
Should the girl have lied to the police? No.
Should the teacher have done their job properly instead of making a total fuss about something so insignificantly petty? Yes!
Should the teacher have even got the police involved over the matter?

Over a teenage girl, texting? Sending her to court?
Jesus.

Ikr, it'll make things difficult if she wants to travel out of the country before she's 18 or get a job before she's 18 if she's actually prosecuted for it. Silly really.

Goose
20-02-09, 10:59
Ikr, it'll make things difficult if she wants to travel out of the country before she's 18 or get a job before she's 18 if she's actually prosecuted for it. Silly really.

I hope it does, she'll stfu next time and do what she's told.

aileenwuornos
20-02-09, 11:11
I hope it does, she'll stfu next time and do what she's told.

While she should have done what she was told in class - getting a criminal record because of something like this is just a maybe a tad extreme.

interstellardave
20-02-09, 11:17
While she should have done what she was told in class - getting a criminal record because of something like this is just a maybe a tad extreme.

All she had to do to avoid that fate was to hand over the phone... at any point. Don't you think if she hadn't jerked the police around and had given up the phone they wouldn't have taken her in?

Once again I'm surprised that people don't see what I see, which is just how obstinate this girl is!

I think Goose said it best (but it could have been someone else): if she acted the way she did towards the police, doesn't that prove that the police needed to be called?

Goose
20-02-09, 11:17
While she should have done what she was told in class - getting a criminal record because of something like this is just a maybe a tad extreme.

She'll learn her lesson though. If she was into her studies her teacher would have shown some compassion, so its obvious it wasnt the first time she's acted like an idiot.

The fact she had the stupidity to lie to the police shows she dumb enough to act up with just a teacher.

aileenwuornos
20-02-09, 11:23
She was probably scared of the police, hence the lying. Police are pretty ****ing scary to a lot teenager/adult/person.

A better way to teach her a lesson would be ban her from a mobile phone, make her clean dirty toilets or something like that. Giving her a criminal record does nothing except turn her into a criminal.

MattTR
20-02-09, 11:23
apparently a world that condones children disobeying authority :rolleyes:

Arresting a 14 year old for texting, that's condoning children from disobeying authority? :rolleyes:

Come on, there's more important things out there to worry about like children who do drugs or conceal weapons.

interstellardave
20-02-09, 11:35
She wasn't arrested for texting...

Ward Dragon
20-02-09, 11:37
A better way to teach her a lesson would be ban her from a mobile phone, make her clean dirty toilets or something like that.

If she brings a phone in anyway and refuses to hand it over, the teacher is not allowed to physically take it from her so there would be no way to enforce a cell-phone ban. As for making her clean dirty toilets, they can't physically force her to do that either or they'd be arrested for assault. Besides, even if she was willing to clean the school toilets, I don't think that the school would be allowed to ask her to do it since they'd get sued if she gets injured on the wet floor or claims she contracted a disease from the wastes she had to clean. It's just a mess.

If the student doesn't care about detention or other forms of punishment that the school can legally offer, then the teacher has absolutely no way to control the student and prevent her from disrupting class. If this has been a recurring issue throughout the school year, then I can understand why the police were called. Hopefully this incident will put some common sense into the girl so that she'll stop disrupting class.

MattTR
20-02-09, 12:08
She wasn't arrested for texting...

disorderly conduct.. my bad. :p it was just an example.

dcw123
20-02-09, 12:55
LOL..
Police in the UK are pathetic. They waste their time on stupid things like this, yet people are being robbed and stabbed - but they don't do anything for them do they..:confused:
I don't know what this countrys coming to..:ton:

MadCroy101
20-02-09, 14:09
Very freaky. Thats why I don't have a cell phone :p

Punaxe
20-02-09, 14:45
(...) the teacher is not allowed to physically take it from her so there would be no way to enforce a cell-phone ban. As for making her clean dirty toilets, they can't physically force her to do that either or they'd be arrested for assault. (...)

Are you quite sure about that? Taking personal belongs away from students for a certain amount of time happens all the time, as does giving them chores when they're removed from the class.

TR93
20-02-09, 14:47
Very freaky. Thats why I don't have a cell phone :p

It's Why My Phone is tunred off during school too;)
I dont understand,
If your in school you should be learning right?...So why would anyone need to be texting? They should be paying attention to their teacher!...Unless it's Lunch hour or something, but then you would be allowed to text because it's free time;)

Ward Dragon
20-02-09, 14:56
Are you quite sure about that? Taking personal belongs away from students for a certain amount of time happens all the time, as does giving them chores when they're removed from the class.

If a student refuses to hand over the cell phone, the teacher is not allowed to wrestle it away from the student. As for the chores, I'm not too sure on that, but again if the student simply refuses to do it, the teachers cannot use physical force to make the student do it.

Punaxe
20-02-09, 14:57
If a student refuses to hand over the cell phone, the teacher is not allowed to wrestle it away from the student. As for the chores, I'm not too sure on that, but again if the student simply refuses to do it, the teachers cannot use physical force to make the student do it.

Right, yeah, that's true. I was assuming people are good and listen to their superiors :p Silly me.

TR93
20-02-09, 15:00
If a student refuses to hand over the cell phone, the teacher is not allowed to wrestle it away from the student. As for the chores, I'm not too sure on that, but again if the student simply refuses to do it, the teachers cannot use physical force to make the student do it.

I Think that's part of the reason why kids who refuse to follow the rules hardly learn their lesson..., because they can't have what they want taken away from the by force, so instead the get sent out of the class room, or in my school get sent to isolation for the day...and even then they still don't follow the rules

As soon as a teacher asks them to put the Cell phone away...they get it back out when the teacher isn't looking...and it's annoying because then the teacher has to shout at them, and waste time trying to get someone to hand over their cell phone, and that means it wastes learning time for the kids who actually want to learn during lessons

Ward Dragon
20-02-09, 15:01
Right, yeah, that's true. I was assuming people are good and listen to their superiors :p Silly me.

The story established that this particular girl didn't even follow orders from the police, let alone the poor frustrated teacher :p

I Think that's part of the reason why kids who refuse to follow the rules hardly learn their lesson..., because they can't have what they want taken away from the by force, so instead the get sent out of the class room, or in my school get sent to isolation for the day...and even then they still don't follow the rules

As soon as a teacher asks them to put the Cell phone away...they get it back out when the teacher isn't looking...and it's annoying because then the teacher has to shout at them, and waste time trying to get someone to hand over their cell phone, and that means it wastes learning time for the kids who actually want to learn during lessons

Very true. I'm currently studying to be a teacher (I take a few of the certification exams tomorrow actually) and I'm still not sure how I'm going to handle situations like this in my class. I think I may have the attitude that as long as the student isn't disrupting anyone else I'm not going to waste class time arguing with them, but I don't know if I'm allowed to accept a student sabotaging their own education like that.

TRfan23
20-02-09, 15:03
It seems the police are getting the wrong sense. This is stupid and so is the girl, why couldn't she just give the phone to the teacher. Some children...

At my school teachers confiscate stuff, but no one would never give it to our head of school. She gives anything she confiscates to charity, then she gets parents complaining on why the hell she did it.

Punaxe
20-02-09, 15:05
The story established that this particular girl didn't even follow orders from the police, let alone the poor frustrated teacher :p

Yeah, I know. I missed the word 'physically'. Here on TV there are reports from time to town of students wrestling, hitting or fighting the teachers, who can't do anything back. No other students jump in either. Makes me shake my head wildly. :(

TR93
20-02-09, 15:06
TRfan23...
Almost exactly the same happens at my school,
The phone is taken to reception and the parents of the student must collect it...or it's given to charity...
But they still don't learn not to misbehave...
Sometimes It's the teachers fault because Although they are not suppose to give the phone back to the pupil themselve...they still do...
They're not exactly going to follow the rules if they think they can get away with it

Punaxe:Hmmm it makes me sad too:(.
We get pupils fighting at school and the teacher can do nothing:(...and once at my old school...about 4 years ago a teacher got hit by a pupil and she burst into tear because she couldn't fight back:(

tombofwinston
20-02-09, 15:23
Why waste police time to get a mobile phone off one uncooperative pupil the police have much more important and more interesting things to to like catching that guy who stole money off thoes cookie scout girls:rolleyes:

Tonyrobinson
20-02-09, 15:58
That just says so much about teachers who can't handle a pupil. Very sloppy and doesn't reflect the school well.

snake_robot
20-02-09, 16:44
LOL.Thats stupid.

interstellardave
20-02-09, 17:24
That just says so much about teachers who can't handle a pupil. Very sloppy and doesn't reflect the school well.

Their hands are tied. Parents and Lawyers see to that. And, again, if she won't even listen to the police doesn't that prove that the teachers/school needed to contact them in the first place? It's not as if the police showed up and she right away said "I was wrong; I'm sorry".

irjudd
20-02-09, 17:26
She's hopeless and a menace to society. Only thing left to do is send her off to be on a chain gang :mis:

Maybe then she'd get some work done and contribute something to this world.

spikejones
20-02-09, 17:38
They probably are in class. Not a day goes by that I don't go to school and see at least six people in each class texting.
Here's a thought, and try to view this from every different angle you can see:

A) The students are texting each other right in the same class room. They are wasting money when they can simply write a note on a piece of paper, ball it up and throw it at the recipient when the teacher is not looking. Whatever happened to those days? You don't get much grief for that do you?

B) She was texting to people in other classrooms, as may be the case considering the police went to "several classrooms" and questioned her friends. In this case, she is disrupting not just the one classroom, but several. It could very well have been disrupting the learning of the entire school.

You may then point out why havent her friends been arrested? Because they actually cooperated when the police questioned them.

She was probably scared of the police, hence the lying. Police are pretty ****ing scary to a lot teenager/adult/person.

its just a person trying to do his job. do you throw mud on the floor while the janitor is just about to finish mopping?

A better way to teach her a lesson would be ban her from a mobile phone, make her clean dirty toilets or something like that. Giving her a criminal record does nothing except turn her into a criminal.pah! labeling someone does not make anyone anything. she made herself a criminal by breaking the law of resisting an officer and interfering with an investigation. and besides... it has been covered previously that she was banned verbally as well as within the school's policy. she obviously disregarded those bans :rolleyes: take the mobile out of your ear and pay attention.
Arresting a 14 year old for texting, that's condoning children from disobeying authority? :rolleyes:

apparently considering the posts here from people like you who say to leave her alone...

Come on, there's more important things out there to worry about like children who do drugs or conceal weapons.do we not have a duty to raise responsible people regardless of how rich or obstinant they are? her parents obviously did not teach her respect and responsibility, the school seems to have failed there as well. Once again, when the parents and school fail, the state will reform.
LOL..
Police in the UK are pathetic. They waste their time on stupid things like this, yet people are being robbed and stabbed - but they don't do anything for them do they..:confused:
I don't know what this countrys coming to..:ton:
this was in the US. pay attention.

BlackRainbow
20-02-09, 19:52
Well, talk about being owned :vlol:

A bit harsh, though O_o

TR93
20-02-09, 20:48
The story established that this particular girl didn't even follow orders from the police, let alone the poor frustrated teacher :p



Very true. I'm currently studying to be a teacher (I take a few of the certification exams tomorrow actually) and I'm still not sure how I'm going to handle situations like this in my class. I think I may have the attitude that as long as the student isn't disrupting anyone else I'm not going to waste class time arguing with them, but I don't know if I'm allowed to accept a student sabotaging their own education like that.


I wish you luck in your exams:hug:

Don't worry about these kinds of situations,
If they dont obey rules it's their own education they are wasting, but still it makes me sad to kids my own age wasting thier lives on things that aren't worth it:(....

Ward Dragon
20-02-09, 20:53
I wish you luck in your exams:hug:

Thank you :hug:

Don't worry about these kinds of situations,
If they dont obey rules it's their own education they are wasting, but still it makes me sad to kids my own age wasting thier lives on things that aren't worth it:(....

I know. I don't want to give up on anyone. I do kind of feel like there's a certain point where I can't waste the other students' time any longer if it comes to just letting the one student not pay attention, though. However, my views may change once I actually have to deal with real-life examples in the classroom :o

spikejones
21-02-09, 04:52
Here's a story of a kid who bucked the school system:

His name was Stephan, and while he lived in America - he was born in Germany. He was one of my neighborhood friends growing up. A year younger than me and his older brother Thorsten. While me and his older brother were in classes together, learning our geometry, Stephan was skipping classes and going downtown to smoke weed with the other rebellious crowd. He wasn't a totally bad person, just had a few problems. Eventually, Stephan decided that school just was not for him. He decided to drop out. He was able to land a couple part time jobs here and there, but they never lasted very long. He wasn't a very responsible person. I'm not positive the reason, but most likely it was drug related, he and a group of his buddies decided one day that they were going to rob a restaurant where Stephan used to work. Since he knew where the cash was kept.. it was a simple enough job to run in and run out with the money. Unfortunately for Stephan... the workers recognized his voice. He was found and arrested a few days later. He was sentenced to serve two years in prison, followed by being deported back to Germany.

I know its not a direct parallel with a girl texting on a phone in class, but he wasted his education nonetheless, and turned to crime. If someone had tried to get through to him, this whole thing may very well have not happened. I can honestly say that his parents were certainly not the best ones in the world, I spent a lot of time at their house. They pretty much let them have the run of the mill with no kind of regulations at all. So where the parents failed to raise a decent child, and the school did not counsel, his life went down the drain at an early age.

what ever became of his brother Thorsten?
"Thor", as I call him (or "ton of thor") is still working at the very same theater he was working at 10 years ago. Only now he is the General Manger.

whatever became of me? much the same as what happened to Stephan, but my road of demise didn't start as soon as his, and may have even lasted longer.

so the moral of my story is this... don't ever ignore a person that doesn't want to pay attention. they may go horribly off track. and does this world not despise crime?

tombfan91
21-02-09, 05:14
to be honest that's pretty dumb, to really call the police? seriously. what they are suppose to do is to call their parents and have them pick up the phone. they really didn't need to take it that far. send her to iss, detention, and if that doesn't work oss. I understand that she was texting and all but this also makes the school look bad just as much as she made herself.

spikejones
21-02-09, 06:02
to be honest that's pretty dumb, to really call the police? seriously.

falsely.


what they are suppose to do is to call their parents and have them pick up the phone.
the girl lied to the police officer about the phone number - multiple times. if the school had the number, this would not have been an issue for the officer.



they really didn't need to take it that far. send her to iss, detention, and if that doesn't work oss. I understand that she was texting and all but this also makes the school look bad just as much as she made herself.
sends a loud and clear message does it not? your ass better play it straight from now on!

Draco
21-02-09, 10:31
Sometimes you just need a wake up call, and if this was hers, awesome.