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spikejones
24-02-09, 14:24
In light of the failure of my epicly impossible quiz... Lets have a brain teaser game.

Rules are simple... solve the current brain teaser, and post a new one.
I'll start off with the following:

Imagine for the sake of argument that the earth is totally round, with no mountains or valleys of any sort. Now.. imagine that along the equator there is a rope which wraps around the entire planet, with no overlap. In fact, just imagine that the equator IS the rope, that is - the rope is a perfect circle. Now, imagine if you will that we want to add some certain length to this rope, in order to raise the rope 1 foot from the surface of the earth - so that it would in effect be like a ring around the planet (such as a ring of Saturn.)

HOW MUCH LONGER MUST THE ROPE BE IN ORDER TO MEET THOSE REQUIREMENTS?

Although it is not necessary in order to "win" the question, please provide (for the benefit of others) an explanation as to how you arrived at the solution.

CerebralAssassin
24-02-09, 14:31
loooooooool...my kinda thread!!!!:ton:

how much longer?=2π(r+1 foot) - 2πr.....right?;)

spikejones
24-02-09, 15:01
that's the equation... what is the answer?
btw... I simply call it:

π(d+2) - πd = x

because... 2r = d

--------

okay... I'll give the full answer since I have to head out now and don't want to leave everyone in suspense for hours.

let circumference of earth = πd
let new circumference = π(d+2)
let difference = x

π(d+2) - πd = x
d+2-d = x/π
2 = x/π
2π = x

CerebralAssassin
24-02-09, 16:20
yeah well once you get the equation then it's easy to get the answer!!ain't it?:pso is it my turn?:p

ShadyCroft
24-02-09, 16:55
Not a math fan, so I'll think I'll pass with these brain tormentors. :p

It's interesting to know though that you, Jacob, may be a genius. Chess and math ??! Good to know. :tmb:

CerebralAssassin
24-02-09, 17:28
Not a math fan, so I'll think I'll pass with these brain tormentors. :p

It's interesting to know though that you, Jacob, may be a genius. Chess and math ??! Good to know. :tmb:

looool....it doesn't take a genius to figure that out!!:ton:

....so since no one is volunteering....I'll have a go....:ton:

I want to travel 1,000 miles on an adult tricycle and I have two spare tyres. However, I want to use all five tyres equally and have an equal mileage on each of the five tyres by the end of the trip. Of course I can only use three tyres at a time, so I will have to change tyres during the trip. At the end of the trip how many miles will each tyre have been used?

spikejones
24-02-09, 18:19
without banging my head against trying to figure out when exactly you should change the "tyres" (spelled tires, unless this is a trick question from the get go.) I would simply state:

1000 / 5 = 200 miles

toxicraider
24-02-09, 18:27
Edit; damn too late :p
Ok
if there are 5 tyres, and 3 spaces, then there are 60 different arrangements of tyre.
so each combination would last 16 and two thirds of a mile.
and each tyre is used in 12 of the combos.
so each tyre is used for 200 miles.

Yes it's a very drawn out way of doing it :p.

CerebralAssassin
25-02-09, 03:01
without banging my head against trying to figure out when exactly you should change the "tyres" (spelled tires, unless this is a trick question from the get go.) I would simply state:

1000 / 5 = 200 miles


lol...I didn't even notice that typo!!:vlol:

nah I don't do trick questions!!:ton:

ok...here goes......your thought process is elegant but it ain't that simple....

we can combine all these tires in 10 different ways (the combination formula will confirm this).lets us label these tires 1,2,3,4 & 5 respectively.so we have:

123
134
124
234
125
135
235
245
145
345

.so we're gonna change the tires 10 times.if you divide 1000 by 10,then you get the number of miles you'd have to traverse before changing tires.now....notice that each tire is being used a total of 6 times in all the combinations.so....you multiply 100 by 6 and you get 600 miles.and that's your answer!;)

alright....whoever wants a go can go next..:ton:

spikejones
25-02-09, 03:14
ah yes... I arrived at those possible combinations myself and noticed the discrepancies when I multiplied it back out as you did. however... if you write out ALL the possible combinations, there is 12 per tire (A,B,C,D,E) even though there is repetition in combinations - if you were to follow the logic put forth by toxic raider (although it is inherently flawed in the fact that each tire is used MORE than 12 times)...

it does work out that way if you were to make the changes put forth by him/her, starting with ABC, then ABD, ABE, etc.. all combinations beginning with A - then all combinations beginning with B etc.. ;)

1000 miles / 60 combinations = 16.666666666666666666666 miles per combination
16.666666666666666666666 miles/combination * 12 combinations/tire = 200 miles/tire ;)

^ longer way of saying:

1000 miles / 5 tires = 200 miles/tire ;)

edit. notice I said the logic was inherently flawed due to repetition of combinations.;)
I had worked it out while waiting to get a hair cut, but didn't bother to post it - my answer was already up and I had hoped someone would be along to play some more. :(

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

my brain is too sleepy to think up a new one right now. someone else can go.

freeze10108
25-02-09, 03:48
I have some really good ones, but I have to wait until tomorrow to post any of them. (They're from a math competition that I took a few weeks ago, and another group takes it tomorrow, so I may compromise the results of the next group, or so the rules state.) Anyways, here's a really good one:

Jimmy Foster, better known as "J.G." (Jimmy the Gambler), has decided to give up gambling for good. However, Jimmy decides to make one last wager, a huge one. Jimmy wages $147,000 on a race horse named "End of the line." Unfortunately, Jimmy loses his money on "End of the line." (It really is looking like the end of the line for Jimmy).

Anyway, the person who owns the horse finds out about Jimmy's wager and his loss. He makes him an offer he can't refuse, just the same way he has done dozens of times before. He approaches Jimmy and invites him into his office. The man takes a book of matches out of the inner pocket of his suit coat, rips off 4 matchsticks, and places them on the table. He says to Jimmy: "What is your name?" Jimmy tells him his name. He continues: "Jimmy, you see these four matchsticks here? Well, if you can make me a triangle, and a square using only these four matchsticks, I'll give you double your money back that you lost this afternoon on my horse."

Jimmy responds: "You gotta be kidding me. That's easy. By the way, what is YOUR name?" The man says: "Well, my friends call me Benny. Benny the Brain, and Jimmy, it is not as easy as it sounds. Of course, there is a catch. You must make BOTH the triangle and the square, at the same time, and they have to be joined together. And the end result must have less than seven corners."

Jimmy says: "Now, you're really kidding me. Listen fella, Brainy Ben, or whatever your name is, I don't have time for you and your little matchstick trick. I'm outta here." Jimmy leaves and never looks back.

Jimmy didn't think it was possible to do what Benny the Brain was asking, but it is. Can you make the square and triangle, joined together, using only four matchsticks (of equal length), the end result having less than seven corners?

CerebralAssassin
25-02-09, 03:51
ah yes... I arrived at those possible combinations myself and noticed the discrepancies when I multiplied it back out as you did.

what discrepancies?just because all tires have traversed 600 miles doesn't mean the tricycle has traversed 3,000 miles lol.don't look at it that way (it seems counterintuitive I know...but it's the right answer;)):D

however... if you write out ALL the possible combinations, there is 12 per tire (A,B,C,D,E) even though there is repetition in combinations - if you were to follow the logic put forth by toxic raider (although it is inherently flawed in the fact that each tire is used MORE than 12 times)...

you are talking about permutations and not combinations....no where in the original statement it is implied that order matters....just that the tires be used an equal amount of time....and my elegant solution fullfils that requirement.no need to complicate a problem even further than it has to be!!:ton:

spikejones
25-02-09, 04:00
discrepancy with my original answer.

I was plainly being childish trying to prove an inherently flawed solution. the other 50 combinations were repeats of the 10 unique ones, but in different orders. so by that logic, if you were to make all 60 changes - you would in fact be going OVER 200 miles per tire.

I know the answer you provided is correct.. like I said, I worked it out on paper while waiting for my hair cut, by listing out by column and crossing out any repeats I saw. I arrived at 10 combinations

1000 / 10 = 100 miles per combination
each tire is used uniquely 6 times
100 * 6 = 600

its a good puzzle alright.

------------------

freeze... I can do that puzzle with only 3 match sticks if they are of the bendable type - make a house.

freeze10108
25-02-09, 04:06
freeze... I can do that puzzle with only 3 match sticks if they are of the bendable type - make a house.


Very creative thinking there, but I should've been more clear: you have to use all four matchsticks, and for our purposes, they're rigid.

spikejones
25-02-09, 15:14
How about this:
http://i383.photobucket.com/albums/oo279/stryderjones/4matches.jpg
the bottom of the square is formed by the edge of the table - the triangle is inside the square:D

Punaxe
25-02-09, 18:54
I was thinking of a 3D approach...

http://files.noctifer.net/squaretriangle.jpg

CerebralAssassin
25-02-09, 19:56
ah these ****ing match problems...:hea:

just looked up the solution to this one...it's utterly ridiculous!! lots of lateral thinking involved to solve this one...good luck!!;)

ShadyCroft
25-02-09, 19:58
I love the matches puzzles involving a mathematical equation that is wrong and you have to correct by moving only one match.

Rai
25-02-09, 20:15
The only question I have is: Why is everyone misspelling the word Tyre? :confused:

spikejones
25-02-09, 20:54
I was thinking of a 3D approach...


creative!! I wonder where you got this from??

here's a couple more solutions I've come up with, utilizing a different type of square (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/T-square):

http://i383.photobucket.com/albums/oo279/stryderjones/untitled.jpg

http://i383.photobucket.com/albums/oo279/stryderjones/untitled2.jpg

:D

I couldn't help it.... two more:

http://i383.photobucket.com/albums/oo279/stryderjones/extreme.jpg

http://i383.photobucket.com/albums/oo279/stryderjones/extreme2.jpg

Punaxe
25-02-09, 21:27
creative!! I wonder where you got this from??

here's a couple more solutions I've come up with, utilizing a different type of square (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/T-square):
(...)
Where I got it from? I just couldn't think of anything in the 2D plane :p But...

ah these ****ing match problems...:hea:

just looked up the solution to this one...it's utterly ridiculous!! lots of lateral thinking involved to solve this one...good luck!!;)

I guess it wasn't the solution. :( Though I do think it works. :p

I was thinking about using a different type of square as well... Just a quadrangle would be no problem, but the geometric square... The "lateral thinking" tip may mean that you're on the right track by not going that way.

Perhaps freeze should just let us know :p

spikejones
25-02-09, 21:32
hell, all of my answers have been lateral to some extent or another - first by bending the matches in half to make a house - then using a different object as the side of a geometrical 4 sided square, and on down the line to where my last one ended up. I see yours as valid as well, though I can't be arsed to count how many corners you would consider it having.

Punaxe
25-02-09, 21:34
Yeah, the corners-requirement is kind of shady...

Lara Croft!
25-02-09, 21:38
Had I entered a thread in Japanese, I would have understood more...:D:D:D:D

freeze10108
25-02-09, 22:38
All the answers so far have been very creative, and the ones that involve a "play-on-words" (T-Square and Carpenter's Square) are approaching the answer I'm looking for, but still haven't quite hit it. About the triangle though: It will be a closed figure.


Perhaps freeze should just let us know :p

If those who've attempted it want to give up, I'll post the solution (at least the one I'm looking for.)

PS

Sorry for the delay, I've been at school.http://i44.************/20ijeb9.jpg

Hermina94
25-02-09, 22:43
LOL im not a genious type

spikejones
25-02-09, 23:08
how about a "triangle - squared" such as:

|X|

triangle times triangle = triangle squared ;)

or.. triangle = 3
3 squared = 9

make a nine with two vertical matchsticks (one on top of the other) and the other two are angled to form an equilateral triangle with the top matchstick.

http://i40.************/fa8vh4.jpg

freeze10108
25-02-09, 23:13
Yep, you got it as I was responding to your uneditied post! Although, I was thinking of a 4 like so: (hold on, ascii art isn't working like I thought, so I'll draw it up.)

spikejones
25-02-09, 23:16
okies... I'll wait then.

freeze10108
25-02-09, 23:30
http://i40.************/2r2oc4k.jpg

So, you have your triangle (the upper and left part of the 4) and you have your "perfect square" the number "4", as 2^2 = 4 (but I assume you know that.)

spikejones
25-02-09, 23:34
9 is a perfect square as well... but I guess you knew that ;)

some gooduns coming out here!! I'll pass on to another person for the time - unless I come back later and there aren't any more posted. I know you said something about some ones you had for a math test or whatever?

freeze10108
25-02-09, 23:36
9 is a perfect square as well... but I guess you knew that ;)

some gooduns coming out here!! I'll pass on to another person for the time - unless I come back later and there aren't any more posted. I know you said something about some ones you had for a math test or whatever?

Yeah, I've got some really good ones that test your creative thinking in using basic math skills. They're from a national competition, and the second session of that session was today, so I think that I'm free to post them online now. But I should wait for someone else to post something.

Punaxe
25-02-09, 23:40
http://i40.************/2r2oc4k.jpg

So, you have your triangle (the upper and left part of the 4) and you have your "perfect square" the number "4", as 2^2 = 4 (but I assume you know that.)

Bah. :p

M.A.
26-02-09, 00:14
ARGHHH.. My Brain!! It's melting!!

This thread is EVIL! LOL! :D

CerebralAssassin
26-02-09, 05:05
ok....who's go is it?:) I'm in the mood to torture my brain a little bit lol!!

spikejones
26-02-09, 17:07
mine apparently since no one posted a new one after I handed off my turn :vlol:

using the numbers 1 - 9 once and once only, arrange them in the grid below in such a manner that the SUM of each row, column, and diagonal will equal 15.

http://i383.photobucket.com/albums/oo279/stryderjones/15.jpg

Punaxe
26-02-09, 17:13
Ahh I remember we had that puzzle in primary school, I used to do it all the time :p Also a multiplication version I think...

EDIT: I got this one:

4 9 2
3 5 7
8 1 6

I think that's right... Key was placing the 9 on a place where it only needs to be part of 2 sums, because there are only two options to form 6 (2+4, 5+1).

spikejones
26-02-09, 17:58
Ahh I remember we had that puzzle in primary school, I used to do it all the time :p Also a multiplication version I think...

EDIT: I got this one:

4 9 2
3 5 7
8 1 6

I think that's right... Key was placing the 9 on a place where it only needs to be part of 2 sums, because there are only two options to form 6 (2+4, 5+1).
there you go... one of the main keys to this is starting out by arranging the 9, 8, and 7 on separate rows, columns, and diagonals - elsewise you will go over 15. Also, the 6 must not be in the same row, diagonal, or column as the nine - elsewise you meet 15 too soon and the third digit will place you over. Very well done..

the helm is yours my friend. steer a clear course, and run us not into an iceberg :p

Punaxe
26-02-09, 19:31
Alright I don't really know any by heart, so I looked one up...

You are about to enter a room which has a lightbulb in it. There are three switches at the outside of this room, one of which controls the bulb. You cannot see whether or not the light is on.
You are allowed to switch all switches on and off as you please before you enter. After that, when you go inside, you will know which switch controls the light.
How do you do that?

CerebralAssassin
26-02-09, 19:43
Alright I don't really know any by heart, so I looked one up...

You are about to enter a room which has a lightbulb in it. There are three switches at the outside of this room, one of which controls the bulb. You cannot see whether or not the light is on.
You are allowed to switch all switches on and off as you please before you enter. After that, when you go inside, you will know which switch controls the light.
How do you do that?

you'll know because you'll see the light seeping through the crack under the door before you enter...how's that for lateral thinking??:ton:

Punaxe
26-02-09, 21:05
you'll know because you'll see the light seeping through the crack under the door before you enter...how's that for lateral thinking??:ton:

"You cannot see whether or not the light is on."

Oh, snap!

ShadyCroft
26-02-09, 21:09
Ok then, bring someone with you and let him get inside the room. Try out all the switches and let him yell when the light bulb is on. ;)

It doesn't say anything like "You must be alone" in the riddle.

Punaxe
26-02-09, 22:09
EDIT: "You must be alone."

:rolleyes:

toxicraider
26-02-09, 22:12
Because 2 of the switches will have turned off the lights in the room you're already in? :p

Punaxe
26-02-09, 23:04
Because 2 of the switches will have turned off the lights in the room you're already in? :p

Nope, the other two do nothing.

spikejones
26-02-09, 23:06
well...
turn on one switch - open door - see result. if light is off, close door, flip switch down, and flip next one up - open door - see result. repeat until light is on - only then do you enter the room. :D

or:
unscrew the faceplate and look at which one is hooked up.

(this all of course assumes that the other switches don't act in the manner described by toxicraider)

Punaxe
26-02-09, 23:09
No no, the only thing you can do is flip switches, and you get one shot at walking into the room. There is nothing in between, so no peeking :p

spikejones
26-02-09, 23:16
howsabout a non-standard light switch which has a light inside of it. when the light in the room is ON, the light in the switch goes OFF.

Punaxe
26-02-09, 23:17
Nope, no way of telling whether or not the light is on until you're in the room.

spikejones
26-02-09, 23:18
^kinda works against the point of the puzzle does it not:confused:
:hea:

Punaxe
26-02-09, 23:22
^kinda works against the point of the puzzle does it not:confused:
:hea:

You don't have to know before you walk into the room, as long as you'll know shortly after you entered.

spikejones
26-02-09, 23:22
wait.... something tells me from the wording that only ONE of the "switches" is a "light switch". The other two must be a different type of switch - like a thermostat switch.

Punaxe
26-02-09, 23:25
All three are simple on/off switches without label, all look alike, and there's nothing about them that would indicate anything more.

spikejones
26-02-09, 23:27
well lets throw logic of hidden wiring out the window and say that when you walk into the room after putting all the switches to the "on" position, you can then see where the wires run to the back of the switches - since the wall is not covering the back. perhaps it is a shed and there is not any need to have dry wall in place - hence the exposed wiring.

Punaxe
26-02-09, 23:30
Nope. :p Assume it's all going into the walls. No visible wiring.

spikejones
26-02-09, 23:32
last ditch effort for a while...
the room you walk into has a wiring diagram of sorts - showing which switch turns on the light. :D

freeze10108
26-02-09, 23:32
My not exactly complete answer is thus:

flick two switches before you enter the room, hope to God the light isn't on, and if it isn't, the one you didn't flick is the one that controls the light. If it's on though, I have no clue.

Punaxe
26-02-09, 23:34
freeze is going into the right direction, but there is a way to be certain.

One more thing: you can take as much time as you want.

Gabi
26-02-09, 23:38
freeze is going into the right direction, but there is a way to be certain.

One more thing: you can take as much time as you want.
Ohhh, I think I have got it now, but I don't want it to be my turn next, because I am about to hit the hay.
Would it be ok to post my "solution" and then give my turn away?

Punaxe
26-02-09, 23:40
Of course :tmb:

Gabi
26-02-09, 23:45
For the purpose of clarity, imagine that you number the switches (in your head) 1, 2 and 3.
You turn switch 1 on for quite some time and then turn it off.
You then turn switch 2 on and go into the room.
If the light is on, it obviously was switch 2.
If the light is still off and the bulb is warm it was switch 1.
If the light is off and the bulb is cold, then it was switch 3.
Right?

Punaxe
26-02-09, 23:46
Correct! :tmb:

Anyone who has a good brain teaser, feel free to post the next one :p

spikejones
26-02-09, 23:47
very good one..
I was about to suggest walk in the room and reach your arm out the door to flip the switch. :vlol:

I was sort of under the impression though that we had to have the light turned on before going in the room, and thus had to arrive at which switch turned it on before even opening the door :hea:
oh well..

freeze10108
27-02-09, 02:52
I'd like to go again.http://i43.************/t7odj4.jpg

Here's a puzzler:
In a far away land, it was known that if you drank poison, the only way to save yourself is to drink a stronger poison, which neutralizes the weaker poison. The king that ruled the land wanted to make sure that he possessed the strongest poison in the kingdom, in order to ensure his survival, in any situation. So the king called the kingdom's pharmacist and the kingdom's treasurer, he gave each a week to make the strongest poison. Then, each would drink the other one's poison, then his own, and the one that will survive, will be the one that had the stronger poison.
The pharmacist went straight to work, but the treasurer knew he had no chance, for the pharmacist was much more experienced in this field, so instead, he made up a plan to survive and make sure the pharmacist dies. On the last day the pharmacist suddenly realized that the treasurer would know he had no chance, so he must have a plan. After a little thought, the pharmacist realized what the treasurer's plan must be, and he concocted a counter plan, to make sure he survives and the treasurer dies. When the time came, the king summoned both of them. They drank the poisons as planned, and the treasurer died, the pharmacist survived, and the king didn't get what he wanted.
What exactly happened there?

spikejones
27-02-09, 03:09
okay..
the treasurer wanted to steal some of the "strong poison" from the pharmacists in order to survive (illogical as it may seem). The pharmacist realized this and made two batches of weak poison. The treasurer stole one of them thinking it would be a really strong one and sure to save his life. Unbeknownst to the treasurer, the pharmacist has also made a much weaker poison - knowing that it would give him plenty of time to survive for what was to follow.

shortly before the appointed time, the pharmacist drank a good quantity the weakest of the two poisons he made, and was rid of the evidence before the contest. Then, the treasurer and pharmacist both drank of an equal strength poison. For the pharmacist it meant a step towards saving his life, but not so for the treasurer. They traded poisons and drank again, now the pharmacist was surely saved as the remainder of the identical poisons had fully neutralized the weakest poison he drank before the competition. However, the results were fatal for the treasurer as the poison was exactly the same and had no effect save to heighten the poison effects.

The king was not able to get the strongest poison available since the pharmacist wisely chose to make a weak poison. Nor was he able to rid himself of the prime suspect of a poisoning, as the pharmacist was still alive ;)

freeze10108
27-02-09, 03:38
Damn that was fast.:yik: Well, it's not the answer I was expecting, but the logic works out fine, so you're righthttp://i44.************/fac3o0.jpg. I was looking for something more like this:

"The treasurer's plan was to drink a weak poison prior to the meeting with the king, and then he would drink the pharmacist's strong poison, which would neutralize the weak poison. As his own poison he would bring water, which will have no effect on him, but the pharmacist who would drink the water, and then his poison would surely die. When the pharmacist figured out this plan, he decided to bring water as well. So the treasurer who drank poison earlier, drank the pharmacist's water, then his own water, and died of the poison he drank before. The pharmacist would drink only water, so nothing will happen to him. And because both of them brought the king water, he didn't get a strong poison like he wanted."

But the open-endedness of the question allows for your answer. Anyways, I would've answered sooner, but my laptop locked up, so I had to reboot it (damn 11 year old BIOS and hardwarehttp://i43.************/2euof1l.jpg).

spikejones
27-02-09, 03:48
gotta love the thieving sabotage :D

I only know classic ones really so I'll see how this one goes.. wait. aha! I'll have to see if I can dig up the one I keep forgetting the answer to (or at least never knew).

here we go (modernized version):

Your driving down the road on your way to town and come to a T junction in the road. There is nothing around, no signs, no landmarks, cant see the stars, moon or sun. At the intersection, there is a house. The house has 2 brothers. 1 always tells the truth, 1 always tells lies. You know this, but you don't know which is which... The brothers only allow you to ask ONE question. This question can only be asked to ONE brother. You cant ask more than one question and you cant ask both brothers. You don't know which way you need to go. You need to find out the answer.

What is the one question you would ask to find out if you need to turn left or right to get to town?

freeze10108
27-02-09, 03:56
Quick question before I go to ponder this, can they answer more than just "yes" or "no"?

spikejones
27-02-09, 04:06
yes... it can be more than a yes / no answer.

and with that, I will head out for the night. pc needs to get shut down till I get up in the morning (about 9 hours)

Ward Dragon
27-02-09, 04:16
What is the one question you would ask to find out if you need to turn left or right to get to town?

Ah, I know this one :D

You ask one of the brothers "Which way would your brother tell me to go to get to town?" Then you go the opposite way. If you asked them directly which way to go, the one who tells the truth would tell you the right way and the one who lies would tell you the wrong way. So, if you ask the truth-teller what his brother would say, he'd tell the truth which would be the brother's lie. If you ask the liar what his brother would say, he'd lie and say the wrong way. Either way you get the lie so you know the truth is the other direction :D

CerebralAssassin
27-02-09, 07:21
yup that's it!!!heard that one before...:D

spikejones
27-02-09, 14:51
The smoking dragon has spoken correctly!

ShadyCroft
27-02-09, 15:34
Hey, that's really genius ! :tmb: and I was thinking up ridiculous solutions. :p

kristi
27-02-09, 16:17
Alright I don't really know any by heart, so I looked one up...

You are about to enter a room which has a lightbulb in it. There are three switches at the outside of this room, one of which controls the bulb. You cannot see whether or not the light is on.
You are allowed to switch all switches on and off as you please before you enter. After that, when you go inside, you will know which switch controls the light.
How do you do that?

OK.I think this is the solution.

Turn on the first switch and leave it turned on.
Turn on the second switch and turn off for about 5 mins.
Leave the third switch as it is.

Now,

If then bulb is turned on,the first switch controls the bulb.
If not,touch it.If it's hot,the second switch controls the bulb.
If it's cold,the third switch controls the bulb.

For the purpose of clarity, imagine that you number the switches (in your head) 1, 2 and 3.
You turn switch 1 on for quite some time and then turn it off.
You then turn switch 2 on and go into the room.
If the light is on, it obviously was switch 2.
If the light is still off and the bulb is warm it was switch 1.
If the light is off and the bulb is cold, then it was switch 3.
Right?

Ooops.I'm so slow.:o

Punaxe
27-02-09, 16:20
Good job nonetheless :tmb: It's actually Ward Dragon's turn to post something, but if you have one, go ahead I guess...

kristi
27-02-09, 16:26
Should I take the turn?
OK I'm waiting for Ward Dragon to post one.:)

Ward Dragon
27-02-09, 19:31
Darn, sorry I took so long. I went to bed after posting the answer yesterday and then this morning I went to the eye doctor (turns out I have an astigmatism which is why I can't see straight lately).

I'm trying to think of a good one, so I cheated and used google :p I stumbled across the answer to a riddle that was told to me in elementary school and I never figured out before. Turns out the teacher said the riddle wrong so it was impossible to solve. Here's the correct wording, although I wouldn't be surprised if some people here already have heard the answer :o

Think of words ending in -GRY. Angry and hungry are two of them. There are only three words in the English language. What is the third word? The word is something that everyone uses every day. If you have listened carefully, I have already told you what it is.

CerebralAssassin
27-02-09, 19:34
gry?:D

irjudd
27-02-09, 19:35
^ Jen now that's just more of a trick question than a riddle! :p

toxicraider
27-02-09, 19:36
Darn, sorry I took so long. I went to bed after posting the answer yesterday and then this morning I went to the eye doctor (turns out I have an astigmatism which is why I can't see straight lately).

I'm trying to think of a good one, so I cheated and used google :p I stumbled across the answer to a riddle that was told to me in elementary school and I never figured out before. Turns out the teacher said the riddle wrong so it was impossible to solve. Here's the correct wording, although I wouldn't be surprised if some people here already have heard the answer :o

I've heard that one already, so i won't give away the answer, although I hope your eye problems get a bit better. :hug:

Ward Dragon
27-02-09, 19:46
gry?:D

Nope :p

^ Jen now that's just more of a trick question than a riddle! :p

Well maybe, but it's been bothering me for over a decade and I feel so triumphant now that I know the answer (I figured it out instantly once I saw the correct wording of the question) so I wanted to pass it on :vlol:

I've heard that one already, so i won't give away the answer, although I hope your eye problems get a bit better. :hug:

Thank you :hug: Apparently I just need new glasses with the proper prescription and that will pretty much solve my problem. I've already got the prescription, so now I need to find a store that will fill it for a reasonable price :pi:

kristi
27-02-09, 19:47
Language.
There are three words in THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE!
Language is the third word in THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE.
And we use "language" every day.
There is no other word ending with -GRY as far as I can think now.

This was so tricky.It was too easy and obvious for a brain teaser.So I abandoned that possibility.And I also heard that riddle before.:p

Neteru
27-02-09, 19:51
There are many answers to the question. And there are many words ending in -gry. It is a trick question.

kristi
27-02-09, 19:52
There are many answers to the question. And there are many words ending in -gry. It is a trick question.

Really?:confused:
Could you mention some,please?

Ward Dragon
27-02-09, 20:00
Language.
There are three words in THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE!
Language is the third word in THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE.
And we use "language" every day.
There is no other word ending with -GRY as far as I can think now.

This was so tricky.It was too easy and obvious for a brain teaser.So I abandoned that possibility.And I also heard that riddle before.:p

Yup, this is the answer I was looking for :D

On a side note, I can only think of angry and hungry. Are there really more English words ending in -gry? :confused:

kristi
27-02-09, 20:05
OK.
There's a brain teaser that teased me for some time.This requires a lot of side imagination.

There is a man,who lives on the 10th floor.On a normal day,he takes the elevator all the way down to the 1st floor to get to work.Then,after he gets back to work,he takes the elevator up to the 7th floor and from the 7th floor to the 10th floor,he climbs up the stairs.On a rainy day,he climbs all the way up with the elevator(from 1st floor to the 10th floor).Why does this happen?

Instruction:On a rainy day,the man has an umbrella.

Neteru
27-02-09, 20:05
Google is your friend.

affect-hungry
fire-angry
MacLoingry
Seagry
aggry
Gagry
mad-angry
self-angry
Agry
girl-hungry
mad-hungry
selfe-angry
ahungry
gonagry
magry
sensation-hungry
air-hungry
gry
malgry
sex-angry
anhungry
haegry
man-hungry
sex-hungry
Badagry
half-angry
managry
Shchigry
Ballingry
hangry
mannagry
shiggry
begry
heart-angry
Margry
Shtchigry
bewgry
heart-hungry
maugry
sight-hungry
boroughmongry
higry pigry
mawgry
skugry
bowgry
hogry
meagry
Sygry
braggry
hogrymogry
meat-hungry
Tangry
Bugry
hongry
menagry
Tchangry
Chockpugry
hound-hungry
messagry
Tchigry
Cogry
houngry
music-hungry
tear-angry
cony-gry
huggrymuggry
nangry
th'angry
conyngry
hund-hungry
overangry
tike-hungry
cottagry
Hungry
Bungry
Pelegry
Tingry
Croftangry
hwngry
Pingry
toggry
diamond-hungry
iggry
Podagry
ulgry
dog-hungry
Jagry
Pongry
unangry
dogge-hungry
job-hungry
pottingry
vergry
Dshagry
kaingry
power-hungry
Vigry
Dzagry
land-hungry
profit-hungry
vngry
eard-hungry
Langry
puggry
war-hungry
Echanuggry
leather-hungry
pugry
Wigry
Egry
ledderhungry
red-angry
wind-hungry
euer-angry
life-hungry
rungry
yeard-hungry
ever-angry
Lisnagry
scavengry
yird-hungry
fenegry
losengry
Schtschigry
Ymagry

kristi
27-02-09, 20:07
Google is your friend.

affect-hungry
fire-angry
MacLoingry
Seagry
aggry
Gagry
mad-angry
self-angry
Agry
girl-hungry
mad-hungry
selfe-angry
ahungry
gonagry
magry
sensation-hungry
air-hungry
gry
malgry
sex-angry
anhungry
haegry
man-hungry
sex-hungry
Badagry
half-angry
managry
Shchigry
Ballingry
hangry
mannagry
shiggry
begry
heart-angry
Margry
Shtchigry
bewgry
heart-hungry
maugry
sight-hungry
boroughmongry
higry pigry
mawgry
skugry
bowgry
hogry
meagry
Sygry
braggry
hogrymogry
meat-hungry
Tangry
Bugry
hongry
menagry
Tchangry
Chockpugry
hound-hungry
messagry
Tchigry
Cogry
houngry
music-hungry
tear-angry
cony-gry
huggrymuggry
nangry
th'angry
conyngry
hund-hungry
overangry
tike-hungry
cottagry
Hungry
Bungry
Pelegry
Tingry
Croftangry
hwngry
Pingry
toggry
diamond-hungry
iggry
Podagry
ulgry
dog-hungry
Jagry
Pongry
unangry
dogge-hungry
job-hungry
pottingry
vergry
Dshagry
kaingry
power-hungry
Vigry
Dzagry
land-hungry
profit-hungry
vngry
eard-hungry
Langry
puggry
war-hungry
Echanuggry
leather-hungry
pugry
Wigry
Egry
ledderhungry
red-angry
wind-hungry
euer-angry
life-hungry
rungry
yeard-hungry
ever-angry
Lisnagry
scavengry
yird-hungry
fenegry
losengry
Schtschigry
Ymagry


OK,but do we use them everyday????:confused:

Ward Dragon
27-02-09, 20:07
OK.
There's a brain teaser that teased me for some time.This requires a lot of side imagination.

I've heard this one so I won't spoil it for anyone else :D

Google is your friend.

affect-hungry
fire-angry
MacLoingry
Seagry
aggry
Gagry
mad-angry
self-angry
Agry
girl-hungry
mad-hungry
selfe-angry
ahungry
gonagry
magry
sensation-hungry
air-hungry
gry
malgry
sex-angry
anhungry
haegry
man-hungry
sex-hungry
Badagry
half-angry
managry
Shchigry
Ballingry
hangry
mannagry
shiggry
begry
heart-angry
Margry
Shtchigry
bewgry
heart-hungry
maugry
sight-hungry
boroughmongry
higry pigry
mawgry
skugry
bowgry
hogry
meagry
Sygry
braggry
hogrymogry
meat-hungry
Tangry
Bugry
hongry
menagry
Tchangry
Chockpugry
hound-hungry
messagry
Tchigry
Cogry
houngry
music-hungry
tear-angry
cony-gry
huggrymuggry
nangry
th'angry
conyngry
hund-hungry
overangry
tike-hungry
cottagry
Hungry
Bungry
Pelegry
Tingry
Croftangry
hwngry
Pingry
toggry
diamond-hungry
iggry
Podagry
ulgry
dog-hungry
Jagry
Pongry
unangry
dogge-hungry
job-hungry
pottingry
vergry
Dshagry
kaingry
power-hungry
Vigry
Dzagry
land-hungry
profit-hungry
vngry
eard-hungry
Langry
puggry
war-hungry
Echanuggry
leather-hungry
pugry
Wigry
Egry
ledderhungry
red-angry
wind-hungry
euer-angry
life-hungry
rungry
yeard-hungry
ever-angry
Lisnagry
scavengry
yird-hungry
fenegry
losengry
Schtschigry
Ymagry

Firefox versus Google, fight! :p Firefox's spellchecker agrees with me that those words aren't real (except for the compound words which use angry or hungry, but that's cheating :p)

toxicraider
27-02-09, 20:07
Apparently Gry is a word.
A small amount; An hundredth of an inch in the decimal system of measurement devised by Locke

ShadyCroft
27-02-09, 20:11
Apparently Gry is a word.

you hear that, CerebralAssassin ?! :p

Neteru
27-02-09, 20:18
Firefox's spellchecker agrees with me that those words aren't real.Well you've probably got it set to U.S. spelling, which is always wrong anyway. :ton:

*Runs away*

Ward Dragon
27-02-09, 20:22
Well you've probably got it set to U.S. spelling, which is always wrong anyway. :ton:

*Runs away*

http://i48.photobucket.com/albums/f214/WraithStar/Smileys/defiant-1.jpg

kristi
27-02-09, 21:08
Have you still found the answer to my brain teaser?:p

spikejones
27-02-09, 21:15
answer:

the man is a midget and can't reach higher than the button for the seventh floor (although he can reach lower, in order to go all the way down). however - when it rains (and this part gave it away :smk: ) he has his umbrella with which to press the button to go to the 10th floor. ;)

Punaxe
27-02-09, 21:19
I'm a little late with this, but... :ton:

http://imgs.xkcd.com/comics/words_that_end_in_gry.png

spikejones
27-02-09, 21:31
:vlol:

Ward Dragon
27-02-09, 21:39
I'm a little late with this, but... :ton:

Hey, give me a break :p That stupid thing has been bugging me for years and I was so excited to finally see the correct question and figure out what the answer is :vlol:

spikejones
27-02-09, 21:44
well I was tempted to say "words" since it was the third word of the riddle, and the question was technically "what is the third word". ;)

and people do use "words" everyday :D

kristi
27-02-09, 21:49
I'm a little late with this, but... :ton:

http://imgs.xkcd.com/comics/words_that_end_in_gry.png

ROFL.
Poor Ward Dragon.:o
BTW,it's spikejones' turn.:)

spikejones
27-02-09, 21:59
you walk into a dark shed with a match in your pocket. inside of the shed is an oil lantern, wood burning stove, incense, and a torch. Which do you light first?

kristi
27-02-09, 22:01
Oil Lantern?:confused:

Punaxe
27-02-09, 22:02
The match? :p

spikejones
27-02-09, 22:13
yup... gotta light the match first in order to light anything else :p

Punaxe
27-02-09, 22:23
Alright, there are three men, A, B, and C, standing on a stairway at different heights facing the same way such that A can see both B and C, B can see C, and C can't see anyone. All are wearing either a black or a white hat, such that there will be 2 of one colour and 1 of the other. The men are blindfolded, do not know which colour hat they are wearing, or what the others are wearing.

These men have been put in this situation by an evil guy wanting to kill them all, but giving them one last chance. When the man removes the blindfolds, the men get 5 seconds to yell what colour hat they are wearing. Whoever gets it right, is free to go.

4 seconds after removing the blindfolds, man B is the first to tell his colour, and he's correct. How could he have known?

kristi
27-02-09, 22:25
A kind of response.

The incense no,because is too weak.
The wood burning stove is too hard to light up with a single match.And even if it's light up,it only warms the air,doesn't make much light.

So there remain the torch and the lantern.
The torch needs something stronger than a match to be lid up.
So the lantern remains last.

EDIT:Ooops.:o

Ward Dragon
27-02-09, 22:29
Alright, there are three men, A, B, and C, standing on a stairway at different heights facing the same way such that A can see both B and C, B can see C, and C can't see anyone. All are wearing either a black or a white hat, such that there will be 2 of one colour and 1 of the other. The men are blindfolded, do not know which colour hat they are wearing, or what the others are wearing.

These men have been put in this situation by an evil guy wanting to kill them all, but giving them one last chance. When the man removes the blindfolds, the men get 5 seconds to yell what colour hat they are wearing. Whoever gets it right, is free to go.

4 seconds after removing the blindfolds, man B is the first to tell his colour, and he's correct. How could he have known?

If B and C had the same color hat, then A would have shouted right away what color he had because it would be the opposite color to both of them. Since he did not know, B must have realized that he and C had different colored hats. Therefore B's hat was the opposite color of C's hat.

spikejones
27-02-09, 22:30
there was a mirror that only he had the proper perspective in order to see what color his hat was. Had "C" looked at it, being the lowest on the steps and facing towards the bottom, he would have been looking at the ceiling in the reflection. Had "A" looked at it, he would have been looking at a reflection lower down on the steps. The position that "B" was standing at was in the middle of the flight of steps - the mirror was right in front of him on the wall, and thus was able to see a direct reflection of himself, including the color hat he was wearing.

Punaxe
27-02-09, 22:31
If A and B had the same color hat, then C would have shouted right away what color he had because it would be the opposite color to both of them. Since he did not know, B must have realized that he and A had different colored hats. Therefore B's hat was the opposite color of A's hat.

You switched A and C around, but other than that...

http://us.st11.yimg.com/us.st.yimg.com/I/yhst-13995568288271_2001_1834745

Your turn :tmb:

spikejones, stop changing the scenario :ton:

spikejones
27-02-09, 22:34
eh? how did I swap A & C?
A is at the top facing the bottom of the steps - he can see B and C below him.
B is in the middle facing the bottom of the steps - he can see C below him, but not A behind him
C is at the bottom and can't see anyone.

Punaxe
27-02-09, 22:35
No no, Ward Dragon switched 'em around. And there was no mirror.

CerebralAssassin
27-02-09, 22:36
Alright, there are three men, A, B, and C, standing on a stairway at different heights facing the same way such that A can see both B and C, B can see C, and C can't see anyone. All are wearing either a black or a white hat, such that there will be 2 of one colour and 1 of the other. The men are blindfolded, do not know which colour hat they are wearing, or what the others are wearing.

These men have been put in this situation by an evil guy wanting to kill them all, but giving them one last chance. When the man removes the blindfolds, the men get 5 seconds to yell what colour hat they are wearing. Whoever gets it right, is free to go.

4 seconds after removing the blindfolds, man B is the first to tell his colour, and he's correct. How could he have known?

I got this one!!!he knew cause since 4 secs passed without the first guy yelling anything,it means that man B and man C are wearing hats of opposite color (if man B and man C had the same color then man A would have shouted his color).so,if man C had a white hat,he would yell black,and vice versa :cool:

Edit : Damn :hea::hea::hea::hea::hea::hea::hea::hea::hea::hea: :hea::hea::hea::hea::hea::hea:

spikejones
27-02-09, 22:43
oh... so I didn't get it right then?
crap :hea:

Punaxe
27-02-09, 22:44
Turn's to our lady Dragon :p

Ward Dragon
27-02-09, 22:49
You switched A and C around, but other than that...

http://us.st11.yimg.com/us.st.yimg.com/I/yhst-13995568288271_2001_1834745

Your turn :tmb:

Oops :o I read that wrong and did switch A and C in my explanation.

Okay, a real brain teaser this time :p It's not a play on words so don't obsess over my word choice or the order of the sentences.



A man says to his child, "I have ten boxes of coins which look identical. However, one box is full of counterfeit coins while the other nine boxes are full of genuine coins. A single counterfeit coin weighs a gram less than a single genuine coin. If you can figure out which box contains the counterfeits by only using the scale one time, then all the coins are yours." So, how does the child successfully determine the answer and win the prize?

Edit: For clarification, the scale measures weight in grams / kilograms (the same unit as the weights the child is given for individual coins). Also, a real coin weighs 3 grams while a counterfeit coin weighs 2 grams. However the child cannot sense the coin weights and must rely upon the scale to measure the weights.

Punaxe
27-02-09, 22:50
What sort of scale are we talking about, and what exactly constitutes "using it"?

Ward Dragon
27-02-09, 22:54
What sort of scale are we talking about, and what exactly constitutes "using it"?

A normal scale for measuring weight. Using it means placing something on it and then reading the weight. That something can be anything including a single coin, multiple coins, a box, etc. as long as it's all together and therefore only a single weight can be read from the scale.

Edit: Since I mentioned grams in the question, the scale measures metric weight (grams and kilograms). That part isn't meant to be a trick :)

CerebralAssassin
27-02-09, 22:55
can we take these coins out of the box and measure them?how many coins in each box?

Ward Dragon
27-02-09, 22:59
can we take these coins out of the box and measure them?how many coins in each box?

Each box has the same number of coins, and yes you are allowed to take coins out of the boxes if you think that will help determine which box contains the counterfeits :)

Punaxe
27-02-09, 23:00
And the child won't be able to feel the weight herself, while putting it on the scale?

Ward Dragon
27-02-09, 23:03
And the child won't be able to feel the weight herself, while putting it on the scale?

Nope, the way to do it involves using the scale once. It's clever but there are no tricks involved (it's not wordplay and it doesn't involve getting measurements with anything other than the scale).

CerebralAssassin
27-02-09, 23:12
how much do the good ones weigh?do we know?

spikejones
27-02-09, 23:12
1 gram more than the counterfeit ones :vlol:

Ward Dragon
27-02-09, 23:16
1 gram more than the counterfeit ones :vlol:

Pretty much :p

how much do the good ones weigh?do we know?

I was looking for a verbal description of the weighing process so I didn't think the actual weights were necessary. If it helps you to conceptualize it, we'll say that a real coin weighs 3 grams and a counterfeit coin weighs 2 grams. I'll go edit the original question post to make it clearer :)

Edit: Hmm, I may have confused people by not making it explicitly clear that the child knows what a real coin is supposed to weigh :o But yeah, the child does know how much a real coin is supposed to weigh and therefore how much a counterfeit coin weighs as well.

Punaxe
27-02-09, 23:20
Oh, if we know the weights of the coins it's easy. You put 1 coin from box 1, 2 from box 2, 3 from 3 ...

And then measure how much less you have than (1+2+3...+10)*3. If you have 1 less, it was box 1, 2 less, box 2... et cetera.

I think this same technique may also work with unknown weights of individual coins, I was working on that, but hadn't quite figured it out yet... Perhaps only with not 1,2,3,4,5... coins, but 1,2,4,8,16...

spikejones
27-02-09, 23:21
another question.... are we not allowed to take one from each box and place them on the scale one at a time?
for instance I put one on the scale - it reads 3
put another on the scale - it reads 6
add another - it reads 8, so the third is the counterfeit?

Ward Dragon
27-02-09, 23:22
Oh, if we know the weights of the coins it's easy. You put 1 coin from box 1, 2 from box 2, 3 from 3 ...

And then measure how much less you have than (1+2+3...+10)*3. If you have 1 less, it was box 1, 2 less, box 2... et cetera.

I think this same technique may also work with unknown weights of individual coins, I was working on that, but hadn't quite figured it out yet... Perhaps only with not 1,2,3,4,5... coins, but 1,2,4,8,16...

Yeah you got it. Sorry I didn't make the question clear from the start :o Today is not my day for telling brain teasers :p

spikejones
27-02-09, 23:22
yesh.. punaxe's answer makes sense. Ward Dragon darn you for leaving out important information :smk:

CerebralAssassin
27-02-09, 23:23
Pretty much :p



I was looking for a verbal description of the weighing process so I didn't think the actual weights were necessary. If it helps you to conceptualize it, we'll say that a real coin weighs 3 grams and a counterfeit coin weighs 2 grams. I'll go edit the original question post to make it clearer :)

alright,here goes:

we take 1 coin from box one,2 coins from box 2,3 coins from box 3 and so forth.if they were all good coins,then the weight on the scale would read :55*3=165 gr.if the scale reads 164 gr.,then the box we took out one coin from is the one.if the scale reads 163 gr,then the box from which we took 2 coins from is the answer and so on and so forth.:)

Punaxe
27-02-09, 23:24
Alright but now I'm curious to finish what I started... Would it be possible to do the same with unknown weights? Only with the knowledge that the counterfeit ones weigh 1 gram less?

Ward Dragon
27-02-09, 23:26
yesh.. punaxe's answer makes sense. Ward Dragon darn you for leaving out important information :smk:

I was so focused on not making it sound like a stupid play on words that I accidentally didn't make it clear enough :o

alright,here goes:

we take 1 coin from box one,2 coins from box 2,3 coins from box 3 and so forth.if they were all good coins,then the weight on the scale would read :55*3=165 gr.if the scale reads 164 gr.,then the box we took out one coin from is the one.if the scale reads 163 gr,then the box from which we took 2 coins from is the answer and so on and so forth.:)

That is correct, but Punaxe already answered :o

Alright but now I'm curious to finish what I started... Would it be possible to do the same with unknown weights? Only with the knowledge that the counterfeit ones weigh 1 gram less?

I don't think so. The thing requires comparing the actual weight of the group of coins to what it should be if they were all real. If you can't figure out what the weight of a whole group of real coins would be, then it doesn't work :o

CerebralAssassin
27-02-09, 23:29
Alright but now I'm curious to finish what I started... Would it be possible to do the same with unknown weights? Only with the knowledge that the counterfeit ones weigh 1 gram less?

that's why I asked that question in the first place....I'm not sure if you can do it with unknown weights:o

Ward Dragon
27-02-09, 23:30
that's why I asked that question in the first place....I'm not sure if you can do it with unknown weights:o

Yeah, sorry about that :o I thought I had said it in the question, but then again I thought A was C in the other one too XD

CerebralAssassin
27-02-09, 23:34
man I got beaten twice :smk:

my slow typing is really hurting me :hea:

spikejones
27-02-09, 23:37
apparently my absence from school and years of killing brain cells has made me worse at these things - I resort to thinking outside the box in a manner different from the intended answer:vlol: and my math skills have become bunk. :o

CerebralAssassin
27-02-09, 23:41
apparently my absence from school and years of killing brain cells has made me worse at these things - I resort to thinking outside the box in a manner different from the intended answer:vlol: and my math skills have become bunk. :o

lol :vlol:

just imagine if you hadn't been doing that all those years....you would have been stunning us with your genius right as we speak....:D

spikejones
27-02-09, 23:44
well fortunately I quit before I hit 21 and the brain doesn't quit developing before 25 - SO, I can regrow cells. and they say that working on stuff like sudoku will help to build connections between the cells. something like that. so it helps to have brain teasers:D

Punaxe
27-02-09, 23:50
Hmm yeah it's not possible, you would get y=ax+b(x-1), where y is the total weight, a is the amount of normal coins, x the weight of a normal coin, and b the amount of counterfeit coins... All you know is y and the possible combinations of a and b, but all would work out to a different x.

Anyways...

Three people check into a hotel. They pay $30 to the manager and go to their room. The manager finds out that the room rate is $25 and gives $5 to the bellboy to return. On the way to the room the bellboy reasons that $5 would be difficult to share among three people so he pockets $2 and gives $1 to each person.

Now each person paid $10 and got back $1. So they paid $9 each, totalling $27. The bellboy has $2, totalling $29.

Where is the remaining dollar?

I think this one's fairly well known, so if you all already know it, I'll find another :p

CerebralAssassin
27-02-09, 23:52
we already know it!!:p

spikejones
27-02-09, 23:53
there is no missing dollar - its all in the way you look at it ;)

Punaxe
27-02-09, 23:58
Alright alright I'll do another one if you don't mind:

Two men and two women stand on a riverbank. They would like to get on the other side with a boat. Unfortunately, the boat can only carry as much as two people.

The 4 people can not cross the river at the same speed. One women is able to cross it in 5 minutes and the other in 10. The men can cross it in 20 and 25 minutes. (This means that if a men is in the boat, the minimum cross time - one way - will be 20 minutes.)

How can they cross the river in one hour ?

CerebralAssassin
28-02-09, 00:07
the 25-minute guy initially takes the other guy,the 25-minute guy gets off,the other guy gets back and picks up the 5-minute gal,she drives him to the other shore and drops him off,gets back and drives the 10 minute gal and there you have it!!:p

spikejones
28-02-09, 00:12
can we use a rope to let the last man pull the boat back to his side without sending a person after him? - otherwise I end up with best case scenario of 65 minutes with woman "5" doing all the running back and forth. If a rope was allowed, her last trip back would not be necessary and thus the extra 5 minutes would be unneeded - giving us 60 minutes.


explanation:

5 and 20 cross (20 minutes) 20 gets out
5 goes back (5 minutes)
5 and 10 cross (10 minutes) 10 gets out
-----------
5 goes back (5 minutes)
5 and 25 cross (25 minutes) both get out

this is 65 minutes assuming that the max time for each group is what counts - if a rope is allowed where the break is - the last return trip is not needed - thus making it 60 minutes.

else wise - during this time they end up drifting with the current to where there is a bridge that "25" can walk across without 5 needing to return.

Punaxe
28-02-09, 00:16
the 25-minute guy initially takes the other guy,the 25-minute guy gets off,the other guy gets back and picks up the 5-minute gal,she drives him to the other shore and drops him off,gets back and drives the 10 minute gal and there you have it!!:p

Slowest on board counts (it's a weight thing I guess :p), so when the woman and the man go, it'll be another 20 minutes, making 25+20+20+5+10=80.

And nope, no ropes, only people going back and forth using the boat.

Ward Dragon
28-02-09, 00:21
How can they cross the river in one hour ?

Damn, I keep going over by five minutes :p There needs to be one person steering the boat back to the other side in order to pick up the remaining people, right?

Punaxe
28-02-09, 00:22
Yep, the boat always has have a person on board to cross the river.

spikejones
28-02-09, 00:25
you and me both hun... hence my question about the rope to pull it back. or the bridge. now I will throw this out there:

if the river is narrow enough ( or the boat is big enough): walk across the boat to the other side without having to row it. in this case each person is not dependent upon having another one return the boat in order for them to cross it.

and it can be done in 55 minutes ;)

Ward Dragon
28-02-09, 00:25
Yep, the boat always has have a person on board to cross the river.

I got it!

Trip 1: 5 and 10 go across, 5 goes back (total = 15 minutes)
Trip 2: 20 and 25 go across, 10 goes back (total = 35 minutes)
Trip 3: 5 and 10 go across (total = 10 minutes)

That adds up to exactly 60 minutes :D

spikejones
28-02-09, 00:26
ouch.

Punaxe
28-02-09, 00:28
And it's our resident Dragon's turn again :tmb: Do try to give us all the details this time :D

spikejones
28-02-09, 00:30
so that I can win and try to stump you with one I was making up myself :p

CerebralAssassin
28-02-09, 00:36
ready....set....go!!!:p

spikejones
28-02-09, 00:38
I win!!

Ward Dragon
28-02-09, 00:40
And it's our resident Dragon's turn again :tmb: Do try to give us all the details this time :D

Okay, the riddle is to guess which riddle I'm going to post next :pi:

I found a simple one while I was looking. Here it is, word for word, nothing missing this time XD

---

It doesn't hurt to take a hard look at yourself from time to time. This little test should help you get started.

During a visit to a mental asylum, a visitor asked the Director what the criteria is that defines if a patient should be institutionalized.

"Well," said the Director, "we fill up a bathtub. Then we offer a teaspoon, a teacup, and a bucket to the patient and ask the patient to empty the bathtub."

Okay, here's your test:
1. Would you use the spoon?
2. Would you use the teacup?
3. Would you use the bucket?

"Oh, I understand," said the visitor. "A normal person would choose the bucket, as it is larger than the spoon."
What was the director's response?

Punaxe
28-02-09, 00:42
Hospitalize the visitor, because you should just pull the plug? :p

CerebralAssassin
28-02-09, 00:42
neither...just open the drain!!:pi:

it's good to see we're on the same wavelength this evening Punaxe....:pi:

Ward Dragon
28-02-09, 00:44
Both right :p

spikejones
28-02-09, 00:44
may not be verbatim to his response, but I imagine he would say something along the lines of:

"why not just pull the stopper up?"

****:cen:

Punaxe
28-02-09, 00:45
I'll give my turn to spikejones, I'd like to know what you have come up with!

Ward Dragon
28-02-09, 00:46
Alright, alright, next time I'll post a hard one :p

CerebralAssassin
28-02-09, 00:49
alright Chris....let's see what you got...you better bring it!!:ton:

spikejones
28-02-09, 00:51
You are stuck in the jungle at night with no compass or other direction finding device like a map, nothing but a torch by which to guide your steps. The night is cloudy and you cannot see any stars or the moon. You know that there is a village to the East, but you have gotten lost and turned around since night fell and do not know which way East lies. You need to find your way out of the jungle and to the village before the sun rises (for arguments sake - you were bitten by a venomous snake and only have that long to get there, lest you die). How do you know which way to go?

CerebralAssassin
28-02-09, 00:55
follow your footsteps?

Punaxe
28-02-09, 00:56
This doesn't involve one of those things you just have to know, like moss growing at the north side of tree trunks?

Ward Dragon
28-02-09, 00:57
I'm guessing it has to do with using the torch to see which direction the wind is blowing? :confused:

CerebralAssassin
28-02-09, 01:01
follow the clouds?:confused:

Punaxe
28-02-09, 01:03
What does wind tell you about compass points though?

Ward Dragon
28-02-09, 01:04
What does wind tell you about compass points though?

I don't know, but I googled it and found references to people claiming they could find their way using wind direction.

Edit: Maybe since there aren't any trees in the village, the wind blows from the clearing into the jungle? (Or maybe the opposite direction, I can't think clearly tonight XD)

CerebralAssassin
28-02-09, 01:05
generally you'll see some smoke emanating from a village source....so I'd go toward the smoke!!:p

Punaxe
28-02-09, 01:06
Brb, I got Bear Grylls on speed dial... Seriously spike, I think we need a tip :p

CerebralAssassin
28-02-09, 01:08
villages tend to be noisy too!!:p

spikejones
28-02-09, 01:13
sorry.... it was dinner time.
punaxe got it with the moss.

I was hoping it would take longer.:o

Punaxe
28-02-09, 01:16
It wouldn't actually work I think, because in a jungle the circumstances are good for moss on all sides of a tree... I think.

Anyways, I was just going to bed - anyone who has a good one, feel free to post. Otherwise I'll be back tomorrow. :p

spikejones
28-02-09, 01:18
forest then :tea:

CerebralAssassin
28-02-09, 01:28
There is a number.

1. If it is not a multiple of 4, then it is between 60 and 69.
2. If it is a multiple of 3 it is between 50 and 59.
3. If it is not a multiple of 6 it is between 70 and 79.

What is the number?

who will find it first?:p

spikejones
28-02-09, 01:42
76

it is NOT a multiple of 3, so does not need to be in the range of 50-59
it IS a multiple of 4 so does not need to be in the range of 60-69
it is NOT a multiple of 6 and as such is in the range of 70-79

CerebralAssassin
28-02-09, 01:45
yeap!!:)

spikejones
28-02-09, 01:55
i halfway wanted to write a script to do the test, but realized I didn't know how to make a batch file do that without some major working :vlol:

heres one for ya, a bit easy:

You have the misfortune to own an unreliable clock. This one loses exactly 24 minutes every hour. It is now showing 3:00am and you know that is was correct at midnight, when you set it. The clock stopped 1 hour ago, what is the correct time now?

The_Underworld
28-02-09, 02:38
Random guess but 1:00am:o

spikejones
28-02-09, 02:42
nope... remember the clock LOOSES 24 minutes per hour, therefore it is slow - not fast.

The_Underworld
28-02-09, 02:44
I feel dumb right now:p
1:12AM????

Punaxe
28-02-09, 02:54
0512h?

spikejones
28-02-09, 02:54
lets look at it like this:
there are 60 minutes in an hour right?
the clock will only report 36 minutes when 60 minutes have passed.
The clock is stuck at 3 hours (180 minutes) past the time you set it (midnight)

how many real minutes is that? -> convert those minutes to hours -> add an additional hour to that (since the clock stopped 1 hour ago).

Punaxe
28-02-09, 03:04
Hmm 0600 then? I came to 0512 by reasoning that the clock reports 60 while 84 have passed, instead of reporting 36 while 60 have passed... In both cases, it's 24 minutes slow, right? :confused:

spikejones
28-02-09, 03:11
6 am would be correct, however the rate at which it looses time would be constant and not variable - as your original logic seems to allow for. It is basically running at 60% of real time. So if the clock says that 60 minutes had passed - in reality it would have been 100 minutes.

the solution can be arrived at by using one of two methods (that I can think of off hand) first is with a mathematical analogy (or ratio):

36 is to 180 AS 60 is to X
36/180 = 60/X
do your cross multiplying and subsequent algebra to arrive at X=300

OR:

36/60 = .60 (this gives you the speed in percentage form)
180 is 60% of what?
X * .60 = 180

;)

Punaxe
28-02-09, 03:15
36 is 60% of 60, but 60 is ~71,4% of 84.

180*84/60 = 252 (5:12 am)
180*60/36 = 300 (6:00 am)

So... "24 minutes slow" seems ambiguous...

spikejones
28-02-09, 03:23
ahh... but you must have misread - the wording itself tells you that it "looses 24 minutes every hour" - not that it is "24 minutes slow"

Punaxe
28-02-09, 03:25
Perhaps that's an English phrase then... To me, losing 24 minutes each hour can mean either of the two :p

Anyway I was going to bed three hours ago, and by now I am finally in bed... So again, anyone who has something, feel free to post, otherwise I'll post one tomorrow :p

spikejones
28-02-09, 03:26
get that laptop outta the bed!! :p
I'll see you laterz then :wve:

The_Underworld
28-02-09, 03:29
So I can post one?:confused: Ah well:

A steady stream of people enter Mike's place of business and
remove its treasured belongings. The people do not pay for what
they take. Mike allows them to take as much as they can carry
as long as they keep their mouths shut. What are the people
taking and which type of business employs Mike

Punaxe
28-02-09, 03:30
To clarify, the interpretation of "losing 24 minutes each hour" depends on the hour you take as reference... Has it lost 24 minutes when the faulty clock indicates an hour has passed, or is it losing 24 minutes off each real hour?
Yeah, the latter makes the most sense, in which case it'd lead to 0600.

But yeah good night - almost 0512 here... :hea: :p

spikejones
28-02-09, 03:44
hey.. not my puzzle. I got it from a website made by a guy who likes to write and do puzzles like that. I think for the purposes of working on the puzzle though it should just be viewed literally as: "if it looses 24 minutes in each hour (60 minutes) - then it is reporting what the difference is (36 minutes), when a real hour has passed" - rather than "when the clock reads 1 hour (60 minutes), what is the real amount of time that has passed?" because I just dont see how you can "loose 24 minutes in an hour" and have it say 60 minutes when 84 have passed. That's kinda like just having a watch that is "24 minutes behind" - which in that case would be always reading 24 minutes behind what the real time is. Which is what is commonly referred to as "24 minutes slow"

don't worry though - I didn't get it at first either. I thought at first all I had to do was to say "well.. 24 minutes lost per hour - after three hours would be 24*3 = 72", so I figured I should add those lost 72 minutes back into 3 hours to get 4:12 am + 1 hour = 5:12 am.

same answer you had arrived at, but the logic was apparently wrong and based upon the three hours as reported by the clock and not by reality. :confused:

CerebralAssassin
28-02-09, 09:55
ice cream place?

The_Underworld
28-02-09, 17:45
ice cream place?

Nope:)

Punaxe
28-02-09, 18:38
I have no idea... Sounds like one of those "lateral thinking" things I'm not very good at :p

The_Underworld
28-02-09, 18:50
it takes alot of thinking.;)

kristi
28-02-09, 19:44
So I can post one?:confused: Ah well:

A steady stream of people enter Mike's place of business and
remove its treasured belongings. The people do not pay for what
they take. Mike allows them to take as much as they can carry
as long as they keep their mouths shut. What are the people
taking and which type of business employs Mike

Is Mike running a bank?Do the people take money?

Punaxe
28-02-09, 19:46
Or perhaps a library? Concerning "keeping their mouths shut"...

spikejones
28-02-09, 20:52
he works at a fine dining restaurant and he is the restroom attendant - he allows them to take a crap and rid themselves of as much of it as they have within them - as long as they don't get to grunting.
:vlol:

RockSteady101
28-02-09, 22:03
Just wanted to post this one I know.

A poor farmer has moved from his old farmland on the east side of Farmland River to the farmland on the west side of Farmland River.
So, he begins moving what little things he has over to the west side of the river with his one little rowing boat. All he owns is a FOX, a CHICKEN and a BAG OF GRAIN.

He can only carry himself and one of his 'things' over the river at a time...but there are two problems he faces.

-If he leaves the CHICKEN and the FOX together, the FOX will eat the CHICKEN.
-If he leaves the CHICKEN and the BAG OF GRAIN together, the CHICKEN will eat the BAG OF GRAIN

How can the farmer move all of his things over the river, without losing any of them?

Remember, say he takes the BAG OF GARIN over first, he can go back over and get eitheir the FOX or the CHICKEN after dropping the BAG OF GRAIN off at the west side of the River.

:)

Punaxe
28-02-09, 22:21
Take the chicken first, come back and take the grain, take the chicken back and move the fox, then go back for the chicken. :p

But it's not actually your turn :whi: We're waiting for someone to get The_Underworld's riddle first. Or for him to just tell us... :p

RockSteady101
28-02-09, 22:53
Take the chicken first, come back and take the grain, take the chicken back and move the fox, then go back for the chicken. :p

But it's not actually your turn :whi: We're waiting for someone to get The_Underworld's riddle first. Or for him to just tell us... :p

Like...yah.

LMAO, well done. :)

The_Underworld
28-02-09, 23:52
Or perhaps a library? Concerning "keeping their mouths shut"...

Yep:) Your turn

Punaxe
01-03-09, 00:00
Hmm libraries aren't free here, though. :p

Anyways, here's one similar to Ward Dragon's coin riddle earlier...

You have nine coins, one of which is counterfeit, weighing less than the others (that all weigh the same). You have a balance, and you get to use it only twice to determine which coin is the forgery.
How do you do it?

Ward Dragon
01-03-09, 01:18
Hmm libraries aren't free here, though. :p

Anyways, here's one similar to Ward Dragon's coin riddle earlier...

You have nine coins, one of which is counterfeit, weighing less than the others (that all weigh the same). You have a balance, and you get to use it only twice to determine which coin is the forgery.
How do you do it?

I'm good at these :D (Now watch me get it wrong XD)

Separate the coins into three groups of three. Place two of the groups on the balance to see if they are equal. If they are, then the counterfeit coin is in the third group. If they are not equal, then the counterfeit coin is in the lighter group. Either way, we know for sure which group of three contains the counterfeit, so take two coins from that group and compare them with the balance. If they are equal then the third coin from that group is the counterfeit. If they are not equal, then the one that weighs less is the counterfeit :)

Punaxe
01-03-09, 01:24
And right you are :tmb:
That riddle was also the reason I asked what sort of scale your riddle used - I was thinking of a balance :p

Ward Dragon
01-03-09, 02:59
And right you are :tmb:
That riddle was also the reason I asked what sort of scale your riddle used - I was thinking of a balance :p

Ah, I realized that as I was reading your question. Sorry I didn't make it clearer before :o

I found another one that might make people think for at least a few minutes :p

One day Kerry celebrated her birthday. Two days later her older twin brother, Terry, celebrated his birthday. How come?

Punaxe
01-03-09, 03:07
Because celebrations don't really need to happen on the actual birthday? :p

Or, perhaps they were born February 29th, Kerry celebrated it the on the 28th in China, and Terry on the 1st in America...?

Ward Dragon
01-03-09, 03:10
Because celebrations don't really need to happen on the actual birthday? :p

The celebrations occurred on the actual birthdays.

Or, perhaps they were born February 29th, Kerry celebrated it the on the 28th in China, and Terry on the 1st in America...?

Extremely close, but not quite :)

Punaxe
01-03-09, 03:15
Does it involve a date-crossing labour?

Ward Dragon
01-03-09, 03:24
Does it involve a date-crossing labour?

Yeah, close enough. You already pretty much guessed it between your last two posts, so here's the official answer:

The mother was on a boat and gave birth to the older child on March 1st, then crossed the dateline and gave birth to the second child on February 28th. So now during a leap year, the younger twin's birthday is two days before the older twin's birthday.

spikejones
01-03-09, 04:29
poke.. poke..
what's new then?

CerebralAssassin
01-03-09, 10:49
Yep:) Your turn

pfft....what a flawed puzzle....

I worked in a ****ing library...I've heard more conversations take place there than anywhere else!!and rarely did a staff member tell anyone to shut up....just when someone spoke too loudly!!:p

Punaxe
01-03-09, 15:35
poke.. poke..
what's new then?

I was going to bed again :p
Here's a good one.

Mr. Smith and his wife throw a party and invite four married couples. Some of the attendees know each other, others don't. Those who do not know each other, shake hands.
At the end of the party, Mr. Smith asked everyone (except himself) how many times they shook hands. It turned out that no two persons answered the same number.

Everybody knows at least himself and his/her own partner.
If A shook hands with B, then B obviously also shook hands with A.
Mr. Smith nor Mrs. Smith actually knew everyone.

What number did Mrs. Smith say?

CerebralAssassin
01-03-09, 16:55
4?:p

I was pretty much stumped until I realised that the guy with no hand shakes was with the gal that 8 (this or else we run into contradictions).then I asked myself "hey..there might be some symmetry to the problem.... as in the guy with 7 handshakes has to be with the gal with 1 handshake and so on (educated guess).so I did a petty little graph to see and it turns out it works!!:p

http://i145.photobucket.com/albums/r206/CerebralAssassin1983/puzzle.jpg

...the bottom 2 dots are mr. and mrs. smith...and both have 4 lines connecting them!!

I'm sure there's a more "orthodox" way of doing it but I went purely with intuition on this one!:p

Punaxe
01-03-09, 17:40
Correct, but perhaps the others would want to know how you did it? :p

CerebralAssassin
01-03-09, 17:42
Correct, but perhaps the others would want to know how you did it? :p

^ I edited the post!!:p

Punaxe
01-03-09, 17:43
Right on! Your turn :tmb:

Neteru
01-03-09, 17:51
Lesson of the day:

Drawing squiggly pictures makes you clever.

CerebralAssassin
01-03-09, 18:05
^ LOL!!:p

I love probability puzzles,so here goes....:D

King Arthur, Merlin, Sir Lancelot, Sir Gawain, and Guinevere decide to go to their favorite restaurant to share some mead and grilled meats. They sit down at a round table for five, and as soon as they do, Lancelot notes, "We sat down around the table in age order! What are the odds of that?"

Merlin smiles broadly. "This is easily solved without any magic." He then shared the answer. What did he say the odds were?

freeze10108
01-03-09, 18:21
I think I have a solution, but to clarify: Do the people just sit down in order of age, or does the youngest sit next to the next youngest and so on?

CerebralAssassin
01-03-09, 18:23
^just in age order!!:)

Punaxe
01-03-09, 18:25
I assume they're all of different age...

I'm thinking, first either the oldest (chance 1/5th) or the youngest (1/5th) sits down, then the second in the order (1/3), third (1/2) and last (1)...?

So 2/5 * 1/3 * 1/2 * 1 = 1/15th?

CerebralAssassin
01-03-09, 18:36
yeah they are different ages...no that's not quite it,but you're pretty close,just have to make minor adjustments...:p (where did the 2/5 come from?)

Punaxe
01-03-09, 18:48
2/5th chance of either the oldest or the youngest sitting down first, at 1/5th each... Oh and then there's 4 left, not 3...

So: 2/5 * 1/4 * 1/3 * 1/2 * 1 = 1/60 ?

This is about the order of sitting down, not the order of sitting itself, as freeze asked... Not sure if it makes a difference...

CerebralAssassin
01-03-09, 18:53
2/5th chance of either the oldest or the youngest sitting down first, at 1/5th each... Oh and then there's 4 left, not 3...

So: 2/5 * 1/4 * 1/3 * 1/2 * 1 = 1/60 ?

This is about the order of sitting down, not the order of sitting itself, as freeze asked... Not sure if it makes a difference...

this is the order of their sitting positions,not who sits down first or anything like that....still there's one more thing you're not taking into account in your calculation...:p

Punaxe
01-03-09, 19:09
Alright, different approach...

There are 5! = 120 possible combination of the guys to sit together, 2 of which are in order (1...5, 5...1), but because it's in a circle, it can also be 2-3-4-5-1, 3-4-5-1-2, etc... I come to 10 possibilities of that in total... So 10/120 = 1/12th?

freeze10108
01-03-09, 19:09
EDIT: A few seconds too late.http://i40.************/2uj42e9.jpg Oh well.


this is the order of their sitting positions,not who sits down first or anything like that....still there's one more thing you're not taking into account in your calculation...:p

So, wait, we're looking at the order in they are seated (like they're seated in numerical order), not the order they sit down in (like youngest sits down, then next youngest sits across them)?



If so:


Person 1 sits down (1:1 chance)
Person 2 sits down (1:2 chance of sitting down next to person 1)
Person 3 sits down (1:3 chance of sitting down next to person 2)
Person 4 sits down (1:2 chance of sitting down next to person 3)
Person 5 sits down (1:1 chance of sitting down next to person 4)

So: 1/2 * 1/3 * 1/2 = 1/12

So there's a 1:12 chance?

Punaxe
01-03-09, 19:12
Person 1 sits down (1:1 chance)
Person 2 sits down (1:2 chance of sitting down next to person 1)
Person 3 sits down (1:3 chance of sitting down next to person 2)
Person 4 sits down (1:2 chance of sitting down next to person 3)
Person 5 sits down (1:1 chance of sitting down next to person 4)

It's not just about where they sit down, but also who sits down, no? Although we reach the same number I think your calculation is wrong... :p
But yeah, this is about the order of sitting down, not the order of being seated

CerebralAssassin
01-03-09, 19:14
lol...you both answered at the same time again :vlol:

right on the money both of you,but Punaxe was the fastest!!:p

It's not just about where they sit down, but also who sits down, no? Although we reach the same number I think your calculation is wrong... :p
But yeah, this is about the order of sitting down, not the order of being seated

who sits down and where they sit down can be used interchangabely...I personally was thinking of the chairs as fixed and the guys as variables...

freeze10108
01-03-09, 19:16
It's not just about where they sit down, but also who sits down, no? Although we reach the same number I think your calculation is wrong... :p
But yeah, this is about the order of sitting down, not the order of being seated

Well, yes, but I was assuming that person 1 was the youngest and person 5 was the oldest (or vice-versa) and that the rest would fill in in numerical order (2 being second youngest, 3rd being the middle, and 4th being the second oldest).http://i44.************/2s9b21f.jpg

Punaxe
01-03-09, 19:19
Well, yes, but I was assuming that person 1 was the youngest and person 5 was the oldest (or vice-versa) and that the rest would fill in in numerical order.

But why would they do that?

I would say, person 1 has a chance of 1 to pick the right seat, but after that there's 2 persons who could sit down, and 2 seats they could sit down on, so 2/4*2/4=1/4, and so on... I just looked the riddle up at a Web site and they give the same explanation as you do... But it doesn't seem right... :confused:

freeze10108
01-03-09, 19:23
But why would they do that?

I would say, person 1 has a chance of 1 to pick the right seat, but after that there's 2 persons who could sit down, and 2 seats they could sit down on, so 2/4*2/4=1/4, and so on... I just looked the riddle up at a Web site and they give the same explanation as you do... But it doesn't seem right... :confused:

I didn't mean the actual people in the problem, but the numbering in the explanation, with 1 being the youngest, 2 the second youngest, 3 being the middle, 4 being the second oldest, and 5 being the oldest (or the reverse). Given 1 being young, and 5 being old, I though it was natural to see 2 as being second youngest etc. (Like people saying "on a scale of 1 to 10—1 being not very much, and 10 being a lot—how much did that hurt?"

CerebralAssassin
01-03-09, 19:26
But why would they do that?

I would say, person 1 has a chance of 1 to pick the right seat, but after that there's 2 persons who could sit down, and 2 seats they could sit down on, so 2/4*2/4=1/4, and so on... I just looked the riddle up at a Web site and they give the same explanation as you do... But it doesn't seem right... :confused:

or think of it this way : person one has a probability of 1,so skip him...what's the prob that the second-youngest person sits right next to him?there's four guys left...and only one second-youngest guy so the prob is 1/4,and so on...

Punaxe
01-03-09, 19:26
Ah, yeah, I was just still in the realm of order of sitting down, not order of being seated. I get it now :p

My current source of brain teasers is starting to run out... :p

An Arab sheikh tells his two sons to race their camels to a distant city to see who will inherit his fortune. The one whose camel is slower will win.
The brothers, after wandering aimlessly for days, ask a wise man for advise. After hearing the advice they jump on the camels and race as fast as they can to the city.

What did the wise man say?

freeze10108
01-03-09, 19:30
Did he say something like, the "fortune" was actually being in debt?

Punaxe
01-03-09, 19:31
Nope, he could not know anything about that.

CerebralAssassin
01-03-09, 19:33
I don't get it...the one who doesn't arrive first to the city wins? 0_O

Punaxe
01-03-09, 19:34
The one whose camel is the slowest wins, as determined by their arrival times, yes.

CerebralAssassin
01-03-09, 19:37
he told em to arrive at the same time,to split the profit?:p

Punaxe
01-03-09, 19:38
Nope, still racing for personal gain.

spikejones
01-03-09, 20:00
he told them to trade camels (as in each rides the other ones camel)
He who crosses the line first will win - because his camel has still not crossed the line.

Punaxe
01-03-09, 20:01
he told them to trade camels (as in each rides the other ones camel)
He who crosses the line first will win - because his camel has still not crossed the line.

:tmb:

CerebralAssassin
01-03-09, 20:03
he told them to trade camels (as in each rides the other ones camel)
He who crosses the line first will win - because his camel has still not crossed the line.

yeah I thought of that too....but wouldn't the father regard his camel as the one he's currently riding?:p

Punaxe
01-03-09, 20:04
Nah, it was about actual ownership, but making that clear would've made it too obvious I think :p

spikejones
01-03-09, 20:05
place the numbers 1-8 into the grid below (use each number only once). No consecutive numbers can touch each other via the connecting lines: (ie.. 1 and 2 cannot be next to each other - but 1 and 3 can)
http://i383.photobucket.com/albums/oo279/stryderjones/8a.gif

freeze10108
01-03-09, 20:18
Is this it?


http://i42.************/2cpb8nm.jpg

spikejones
01-03-09, 20:19
looks true enough:


The following is one answer, all other answers are a reflection or rotation of this.
http://www.brainbashers.com/puzzleimages/8b.gif

kristi
01-03-09, 20:23
:o:o:o:o:o:o:o:o:o:o
What does odd mean?:confused:

spikejones
01-03-09, 20:29
^well the presence of that post in this thread is quite odd in the fact that I have no clue where it came from or why you are asking it. Odd can mean "out of the ordinary" or in a mathematical sense it can mean any number not divisible by two (evens and odds). Odd can also be used in the phrase "odd man out" whereby to say that there may only be enough of something for lets say 10 people, and the 11th person would be the "odd man out". But it is not strictly limited to that definition either. It can also mean that someone, or a group or people, have left you out of an activity for some obscure reason or other.