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View Full Version : a little film - camera help please


tombfan91
08-03-09, 19:01
i seem to be having problems shooting inside. my shutter speed is at 60. my teacher says to keep it there, so i do. i know we need a lower f - stop but my f- stop seems to only go to 4.5. i can't go any lower for some reason. i tried adding light from different areas, but i get the same results. not enough light

by the way my camera in a minolta htsi automatic

am i doing something wrong?

Punaxe
08-03-09, 20:52
Do you have a tripod? If so, put your camera on there and you can lower the shutter speed all you want. With slow shutter speeds, holding the camera still becomes the problem - with a tripod, that problem's solved.

spikejones
08-03-09, 22:41
agreed :tmb:
it doesnt necessarily have to be a tripod per-se so long as it there is something convenient upon which to place it to keep it sturdy - thereby avoiding motion blurs of a stationary object.

Mr.Burns
09-03-09, 00:49
Tripod. Definitely. You could also use a higher ISO/ASA film though you'll get more grain in the shot. I am curious as to why your professor wants you to keep the shutter speed at 1/60th?

tombfan91
09-03-09, 01:10
Tripod. Definitely. You could also use a higher ISO/ASA film though you'll get more grain in the shot. I am curious as to why your professor wants you to keep the shutter speed at 1/60th?

i don't. she says when your inside always keep it at 60. and lower f-stop. my aperture or iso is at 400. she said to keep it there. keep in mind though, i'm only in basic photography. i don't have a tripod unfortunately

Mr.Burns
09-03-09, 01:18
Okay a few basics for you :)

A.ISO is the film's sensitivity. the higher the ISO rating, the more sensitive the film is to light but the more pronounced the grain will be. If you have a 400 ISO film, then keep the camera set for 400. You could push or pull the film but I wouldn't suggest that (not a good idea for a beginner).

B.Bullhonkey. You need more light in a low light situation so either additional lights are needed or you need to slow down your shutter. this is where a tripod or even a monopod would come in handy. As your shutter speed slows down, motion blur as Spike pointed out, will occur. If anything, try and find some kind of sturdy base you can put the camera on.

C. If you lower your F stop too much, you'll reduce your depth in field (the distance of focus(sharpness) between the foreground and background). If you can find a sturdy base to keep the camera stable, I suggest trying out with the widest F stop that you have, and adjust your shutter speed accordingly. Afterwards, you can up the F stop and really slow down the shutter, if you want.

tombfan91
09-03-09, 01:31
Okay a few basics for you :)

A.ISO is the film's sensitivity. the higher the ISO rating, the more sensitive the film is to light but the more pronounced the grain will be. If you have a 400 ISO film, then keep the camera set for 400. You could push or pull the film but I wouldn't suggest that (not a good idea for a beginner).

B.Bullhonkey. You need more light in a low light situation so either additional lights are needed or you need to slow down your shutter. this is where a tripod or even a monopod would come in handy. As your shutter speed slows down, motion blur as Spike pointed out, will occur. If anything, try and find some kind of sturdy base you can put the camera on.

C. If you lower your F stop too much, you'll reduce your depth in field (the distance of focus(sharpness) between the foreground and background). If you can find a sturdy base to keep the camera stable, I suggest trying out with the widest F stop that you have, and adjust your shutter speed accordingly. Afterwards, you can up the F stop and really slow down the shutter, if you want.


thank you. i did try a few on low shutter speed. even though i didn't have a tripod., so i'm expecting some problems when i develop. i've been kinda nervous, my first roll of film hardly showed up, even though my camera settings said they were good. so i'm a little worried about this one also

thanx for helping me you guys. i thought i was never gonna get a reply lol. she says to keep it at 60, but i will try a few on low and if she says anything, i'll just lie and say it was at 60 lol

Mr.Burns
09-03-09, 01:40
Well, if you're shooting mostly indoors, you're bound to have more troubles with lighting when not using a tripod. But remember, even if you don't get a perfect exposure, you can always tweak the images when enlarging. If they haven't by now, your professor should being going over basic dodging and burning techniques. If you're not sure, just drop us a post here. :)

tombfan91
09-03-09, 01:47
well this is our first assignment, so she just wanted us to take pics u know. work with setting. our next assignment covers that i think. i'll be sure to ask a question here is i don't understand something

spikejones
09-03-09, 02:11
A couple questions here:

A) what is F stop? is that your Flash timing?
B) I never understood dodge and burn on the photo manip applications. Brightness and Contrast are the only ones I really understand (and a little about gamma)

Punaxe
09-03-09, 08:38
The f-stop refers to the steps in which you change the aperture:

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/87/Aperture_diagram.svg

This diagram goes in steps of full F-stops. From f/1.4, one f-stop down would mean you're going to f/2. Steps of one third are also common, so you'd go for example from 2.8 to 3.2 to 3.4 to 4.
Similar steps happen in ISO speeds (25, 50, 100, 200...) and shutter speeds (1/15, 1/130, 1/60, 1/25...) and these are adjusted to fit each other: if you shoot at f/5.6 and 1/125s, you will get the same amount of light as when you shoot at f/8 and 1/60s.

Akhenaton
11-03-09, 05:51
If your teacher insists on a 1/60 second shutter speed, ISO 400 film speed, and your maximum aperture setting is 4.5, you can keep these settings and cheat by using exposure compensation. Look for a dial, button, or check your camera's manual for the exposure compensation feature. You can usually gain or lose one or two stops with it.
Practice steady hand-holding techniques for low light shooting.
Hope this helps. ;)

tombfan91
12-03-09, 02:24
what is the exposure compensation? i've been practicing my hand-holding techniques a lil bit. i move just a tiny bit, but not as much as i used to. unfortunately it's my sisters camera and i have no idea what she did to it (the manual of course)

Punaxe
12-03-09, 05:32
Exposure compensation is basically just a way to adjust the exposure without going full manual, allowing you to adjust (up to a point) the settings (shutter speed, aperture, flash, ISO) that the camera set automatically.

If you can't hold it still, you could try devicing something to put it on, as spikejones said, for example a small ladder...