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View Full Version : 8-8-88 Massacre Remembrance


IceColdLaraCroft
08-08-09, 15:36
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Today is the anniversary of the massacre of 8-8-88 that occurred in Burma.

Students were protesting for democracy in the country of Burma and their own government opened fire upon them and then arrested many others. Hundreds of people died and this happened almost a year before Tian'anmen Square in 1989.

Burma is still fighting for democracy and their elected leader, Aung San Suu Kyi, is currently on trial for violating her 14 years house arrest because an American intruder swam to her guarded home.

Please remember the victims of 8-8-88 and please learn about Burma's struggle for democracy on this day of remembrance.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/8888_Uprising

http://www.irrawaddy.org/

http://i31.************/2m6pf9w.jpg

Super Badnik
08-08-09, 16:22
RIP to those poor protesters. I hope things get better for Berma. I can't stand it when goverments do these horrendus things.

Mokono
08-08-09, 16:32
Thanks for sharing this with us Icecold; indeed, this is very sad and my best wishes are to Burman at all. I really hope more people come to check this thread as the time advances, because is really important to know where life is not as simple as where we live, and also what are these conflicts we're talking about if we really want to understand eachothers and, more important, help each others with peace, not war.

As S.Badnik said, RIP to those protesters and their family who might have suffered not just the loss, but political persecution. Hope democracy can makes it way and that the junta will retreat.

Goose
08-08-09, 16:35
Democracy is something that needs to be fought for, and a helping hand is usually necessary, but in todays social climate i doubt that hand will be given.

IceColdLaraCroft
08-08-09, 18:11
Unfortunately a lot of the support is "I support you" and really the best thing anyone on here can do is to learn/talk about Burma and their fight for democracy.

Rai
08-08-09, 18:13
21 years on and things haven't changed it seems.

RIP to those who lost their lives that day. I hope things get better for Burma so the people don't have to suffer further.

Goose
08-08-09, 18:15
Unfortunately a lot of the support is "I support you" and really the best thing anyone on here can do is to learn/talk about Burma and their fight for democracy.

We cant help them, after all, it was partly Americans who put them in that position in the first place. Allowing communism to spread into democratic countries in south east Asia isn't something Jane Fonda should be proud of.

rowanlim
08-08-09, 18:23
^Yeah, it's the sad truth. ASEAN countries can't do much either (Burma is a member of ASEAN), isolating the country would make things worse (economically, socially etc). For Burma, democracy has to come from WITHIN.

Goose
08-08-09, 18:27
^Yeah, it's the sad truth. ASEAN countries can't do much either (Burma is a member of ASEAN), isolating the country would make things worse (economically, socially etc). For Burma, democracy has to come from WITHIN.

Well in time who knows, at the moment in the uk there starting up an investigation to look at the legality of our participation in the invasion of iraq, if that invasion, or parts of it are legal, then to aid Burma wouldnt be to far fetched. But i doubt the public in the west, through all there crying for human rights there, would accept us sending troops in.

It helped in sierra Leone though, but people seem happier when we kill 'militia' rather then soldiers of a formed government, no matter how equally corrupt that government is next to militias or rebels.

rowanlim
08-08-09, 18:32
Well in time who knows, at the moment in the uk there starting up an investigation to look at the legality of our participation in the invasion of iraq, if that invasion, or parts of it are legal, then to aid Burma wouldnt be to far fetched. But i doubt the public in the west, through all there crying for human rights there, would accept us sending troops in.

It helped in sierra Leone though, but people seem happier when we kill 'militia' rather then soldiers of a formed government, no matter how equally corrupt that government is next to militias or rebels.

That's true. I certainly hope that there will be change in Burma & that Aung San Suu Kyi would be around to see that.

Goose
08-08-09, 18:34
That's true. I certainly hope that there will be change in Burma & that Aung San Suu Kyi would be around to see that.

Yea its all public perception, which isnt always good.

As Burma was a colony, and when given its independance, it was done under the understanding that it would be a democratic republic, im sure Britain does have some reasoning for helping a change back to the countries original self.