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EmeraldFields
08-09-09, 01:58
I came along this article and found it interesting...

http://i26.************/2mcg7xv.jpg
http://eng.sagepub.com/cgi/pdf_extract/30/4/353?ck=nck

It won't give me access to the rest, but from what I read it gives some good points.

Should teachers be allowed to teach about profanity in schools?

Tombraiderx08
08-09-09, 02:01
Fore-warned is Fore-armed, I say yes :)

Agent 47
08-09-09, 02:01
in a perfect world i'd say no........

however kids today use obscenities anyway so why shield them from it :(

AmericanAssassin
08-09-09, 02:24
I cannot stand the use of improper English, therefore, I say no. ;)

just croft
08-09-09, 02:27
Profanity exists wherever you go. Infact, things that can be considered profanity are indeed part of study in areas such as literature, history, arts...

I agree when Tombraiderx08 says "Fore-warned is Fore-armed"but I don't think that's what's most important about teaching it. I myself have had to present work at school that had some extent of profanity in them, the last too I can recall were "Vices" for phylosophy class and a poet's Biography for Portuguese class. I can say that I'm very proud of my work, it wasn't an A (here we use a 0 to 20 system) but it was a very good mark, with my Portuguese teacher even makeing very good remarks about the way I handled the terms and words in the work.

I could have not done these good works if I hadn't had inside class contact with this previewsly. It is used here and should be taught everywhere (if it has to do with the subject of course).

My 7th grade Portuguese teacher said this in the first day of classes: "I use everyword in the dictionary, they exist, they are used, they are used well and they are use badly. I have no problem useing them eighter way."



These last 4 paragraphs in one line: Poetry wins!

larafan25
08-09-09, 02:41
depends what the profanities are...............:)

I say no thought...teach them to not use them:)

ihatecold17
08-09-09, 02:43
I say no. To me people who consistently swear often come off looking ignorant, and why would you teach ignorance? (can you even teach ignorance?) Swearing is something that has become so commonplace that it shouldn't be taught anyway. They'd find out anyway lol

takamotosan
08-09-09, 02:49
If there's a reason for it. I don't see a reason to specifically instruct students the proper uses for the "f word" :p

However, plenty of good works of literature have colloquial language in them, which is already taught anyway.

seashell093
08-09-09, 02:57
I say no. To me people who consistently swear often come off looking ignorant, and why would you teach ignorance? (can you even teach ignorance?) Swearing is something that has become so commonplace that it shouldn't be taught anyway. They'd find out anyway lol

Thank you...excellent words here...
my english teacher this past year made us read books with swear words in it. I do not swear...I think that it is ignorant and immature. Everytime we would read aloud a chapter and it was my turn, I simply skipped over the words. :p Sometimes the sentence was not complete but that was ok for me. I would sometimes be made fun of afterword but I just told them I thought it was not mature or that there is no use for words like that. All of the other immature kids were like this is awesome being able to read books like this aloud and talk free like this in english class. I was simply amused by them being easily amused... like they don't already use swear words inappropriately enough. :rolleyes:

Big Matt
08-09-09, 04:20
Anyone who is adept in the use of the English language already knows how to properly use profanity, if profanity is indeed proper. I don't believe that it is. In the unfortunate times that my anger prevails over my common sense I can create oral masterpieces crafted almost exclusively from foul language. I'm certainly not proud of this but, I am quite skilled at it and no one ever taught me specifically how to properly cuss. I was however taught the proper use of the English language. In my opinion, everyone sounds low class when they use profanity but, if you don't want people to sound like uneducated morons when they cuss, then first, teach them not to use foul language to begin with. Second, teach them proper English so that when they do slip up and use profanity, they don't sound quite as stupid. If a teacher has done his or her job to begin with then there is absolutely no reason to add a profanity section to standard English curriculum.

Paddy
08-09-09, 04:25
Would be quite amusing hearing a teacher give kids lessons on cursing lol

TRfan9294
08-09-09, 04:35
No I don't think so, swearing is a really bad habit in the world today and it shouldn't be encouraged. It's really sad to hear youths using those kind of words but many adults and parents aren't good examples to their children so that's the outcome. It's too bad it had to become so normal in everyday language, I don't like to hear it.

scoopy_loopy
08-09-09, 07:04
No, of course schools should not "teach" profanity. What a horrible idea.

On seconds thoughts, I dont really think it matters. The schools that would agree to teach this crap are probably trashy to begin with, do whatever you want :wve:

SpaceChild
08-09-09, 08:44
That article exists more as an indictment of the pathetic nature of what's passing for "higher education" today than anything else. I assume an accredited course in nose-picking and butt-scratching can't be far behind...

I don't think this "class" suggestion deserves any intelligent response beyond derisive laughter - and an immediate withdrawal of one's kids from Albright College, if you've got them there.

There is a shocking number of college grads who cannot string together a cohesive sentence, who can't spell beyond texting lingo, who don't know the difference between Thomas Paine and Spongebob Squarepants; I know someone who's entering college as a Freshman, yet does not know multiplication tables...(!)

...and our tenured professors think that a slough course on Naughty Words is what constitutes higher education.

Yyyyuh.

IMO, the present-day occupants of secondary school and collegiate faculties are not so much educators as intellectual child molesters. In a world civilized beyond the the Beavis-and-Butthead level, these creeps would be fired immediately and tossed onto the sidewalks on their vacuous arses. Instead they're rewarded.

Yeek.

Forwen
08-09-09, 08:44
How do you go about "teaching" it anyway? I see no practical propositions in the original article.

EDIT
That article exists more as an indictment of the pathetic nature of what's passing for "higher education" today than anything else. I assume an accredited course in nose-picking and butt-scratching can't be far behind...


Well the author IS from Liberal Arts after all... :cool: *ducks*

Goose
08-09-09, 10:01
Yea i think its a great idea to be honest, there was a time when saying 'Oh God' was profain, but its widely accepted as a reaction to pretty much most things now, if every profain word was introduced as a reaction to situations to every child in the same manner, no one would find them offensive by the second generation, the words would be as offensive as things like "oh shoot" when a person stubs there toe.

To be honest those words actually disarm situations outside of arguments with strangers (where they can start them), a simple use of profanity is much more preferable to someone spilling out a load of personal derogatory comments about a friend in my oppinion, even if the latter is in proper english.

LaraRules81
08-09-09, 10:05
Fore-warned is Fore-armed, I say yes :)

Why does that sound familiar? :p


And no,they shouldn't teach it :D

Punaxe
08-09-09, 10:06
I do have access to the full article. The author is mostly giving arguments for why profanity is a part of the American language, citing its uses, dictionary inclusions and literature that has been published related to profanity. He then goes on to tell that his own class on profanity was in his eyes quite successful.

I don't think anyone would deny that profanity is indeed a part of language, but it is still always used in a different context. Profanity is generally used to express an emotional state through language, not so much to communicate information.
Educational systems are there to provide students with the best fundamentals they can give them; with the rules of science, analytical thinking, knowledge, et cetera. The rules of proper grammar and language use are part of this; the rules of profanity, as far as there are rules, add nothing to a student's development into higher standards. Profanity is improper in almost all contexts, and I would argue that schools exist to learn students the exact opposite.

The author does have a point in saying that educational systems ought to keep up with what's happening in the world, and an increase of profanity usage is indeed happening, but the exclusion of profanity from the classroom is enough education on that matter if you ask me.

adventurerLara
08-09-09, 10:51
The teaching of profanities is utterly unnecessary, they will undoubtebly learn it for themselves through other means. They should be concentrating on the other side of the spectrum.

Rai
08-09-09, 11:26
No I do not think bad language should be taught in school. Kids will pick up profanity from other ways, no need to teach it too. Neither should kids be shielded from it. If a set book/novel happens to have bad language (say a character uses it) then it should be explained why it is used and what it means in the context of the story, but that is all. It shouldn't be encouraged.

AODdigger
08-09-09, 11:51
I don't think it's necessary. One shouldn't be taught how to hold a fork. There are many many things pupils learn by themselves which is a good thing. On a subconscious level profane language builds up certain belief systems in a child. I haven't really an idea as to the role they play and if the systems are always the same... not to mention that on first look they seem harmful and maybe they are but who knows :p

patriots88888
08-09-09, 11:56
Teach? In what context?

Many things which we as a society as a whole find unsavory are taught to youngsters as a means of enlightenment and awareness. Drug/alcohol awareness and even sex education to a lesser degree were both standard teachings in Health class when I was in school. So in that respect alone, I say that it can be a good thing.

TRULuverzz
08-09-09, 12:01
they should teach bad words in college or university, so it's a mix of yes and no ;)

Trigger_happy
08-09-09, 12:47
Ha no! school is meant to be an educational and safe place to enrich children's minds, not teach them vulgarities. Fights happen outside of school- does that mean we should teach children how best to physically hurt others?

I'm amazed they even considered it.

patriots88888
08-09-09, 12:49
Just to further clarify my earlier post:

Profanity has become so integrated into everyday society that it might very well be perceived as the norm by societies' youth. It is abundant in movies, music, and text (both internet and RL) to the point where maybe youngsters see it as an acceptable practice in today's society. I see it all the time where many speak profanities as if it's normal practice in everyday conversation to the extent where they might not be fully aware of the fact that they are even using such language and how offensive it can be to those around them.

That is why I say teaching in the respect of awareness can be a very good thing. While you would think that they would already be aware and know better, it's not always the case. And while parents would most likely seem the appropiate teachers of this awareness as with other things such as sex, drugs, etc., many of those same parents might actually be setting bad examples of such things in the first place, thus more exposure to the kids.

Dennis's Mom
08-09-09, 14:34
Is there a problem learning profanity today? Really, I so no need to further legitimize poor and boorish language.

Encore
08-09-09, 15:08
in a perfect world i'd say no........

however kids today use obscenities anyway so why shield them from it :(

Not teaching those words at school is not shielding them. It's simply unnecessary. Whether they learn them outside or not doesn't matter, the subject has no relevance for academic growth.

Minty Mouth
08-09-09, 15:49
This is kind of a stupid idea is it not?

Just why? It's classed as rude, and wrong for children to swear (and just about anyone else, really) Schools are supposed to shape minds, not pollute them. No matter what age It's being taught at.

Atlantisfreak666
08-09-09, 15:50
**** yes.

Squibbly
08-09-09, 16:07
No I do not think bad language should be taught in school. Kids will pick up profanity from other ways, no need to teach it too. Neither should kids be shielded from it. If a set book/novel happens to have bad language (say a character uses it) then it should be explained why it is used and what it means in the context of the story, but that is all. It shouldn't be encouraged.

Not teaching those words at school is not shielding them. It's simply unnecessary. Whether they learn them outside or not doesn't matter, the subject has no relevance for academic growth.

Yes and yes.

I think it's a ridiculous idea. Most kids are going to pick it up eventually, yes, but they certainly do not need to be taught it in school. Profanity serves no real purpose, especially not where education is involved. :confused:

SamReeves
08-09-09, 16:11
Spanish, ebonics, and profanity…

What ever happened to teaching good old fashioned English in school? :(

Encore
08-09-09, 16:12
Spanish, ebonics, and profanity…

What ever happened to teaching good old fashioned English in school? :(

What's wrong with learning Spanish?

woody543
08-09-09, 16:13
Well, I have just started 6th form college, where I'm taking English Lang/Lit and whilst profanities aren't taught specifically, we do study language, and in specific, certain Socialects and Idiolects, which involves the use of slang and profanities. Which I think is perfectly undertstandable.

Alot of literature taught within schools contains profanities, for example shakespere contains words, only in a different context to what is currently thought, therefore I feel mature students should be taught to study them, and to only use them in the correct context.

Our current novel is "A Curious incident of the dog in the night time" which on many occasions use's the F word, and the context that it is in, is perfectly understandable, and gives a certain reality to the novel.

jackles
08-09-09, 17:08
A fair few of the kids I come into contact with are proficent in swearing by the time they can toddle. Some have to be taught that just because mummy or daddy calls them a ****** etc doesn't mean that we do it at school.






Chaucer and Shalespeare have some quaint terms of phrase.

TRfan23
08-09-09, 17:10
No, what's the point just makes them more intimidating :(

A fair few of the kids I come into contact with are proficent in swearing by the time they can toddle. Some have to be taught that just because mummy or daddy calls them a ****** etc doesn't mean that we do it at school.

I've seen parents on the streets/town swear whilst they're with their very young children in yob language :(

You should go and confront their parents ;) Tell them otherwise.
On second thoughts, no because then they'd refer you as one of what you said to :(

woody543
08-09-09, 17:36
A fair few of the kids I come into contact with are proficent in swearing by the time they can toddle. Some have to be taught that just because mummy or daddy calls them a ****** etc doesn't mean that we do it at school.


Oh god I know...

I did my work experience in a primary school, and was teaching 4 and 5 year olds who were using the F word, I was shocked and appauled.

Squibbly
08-09-09, 17:39
A fair few of the kids I come into contact with are proficent in swearing by the time they can toddle. Some have to be taught that just because mummy or daddy calls them a ****** etc doesn't mean that we do it at school.

Oh god I know...

I did my work experience in a primary school, and was teaching 4 and 5 year olds who were using the F word, I was shocked and appauled.

Oh, I come across this too... I'm a daycare worker and teach preschool, and some of the things I hear the young ones come out with, I can hardly believe it. :eek:

Nannonxyay
08-09-09, 17:44
I swear all the time. I'm an intelligent person with a wide range of vocabulary and swear just because it's a habit of mine. I really have no problem with swear words. They're just words and I think if used in the right context, they really don't bother me. We're reading a book in English, where there's quite a few swear words and it adds to the character and helps the reader understand what the character is like, which I think is good.

It really ticks me off when people say anyone who swears must be rude, unintelligent and arrgoant or ignorant. I am none of these.

Squibbly
08-09-09, 17:58
I swear all the time. I'm an intelligent person with a wide range of vocabulary and swear just because it's a habit of mine. I really have no problem with swear words. They're just words and I think if used in the right context, they really don't bother me. We're reading a book in English, where there's quite a few swear words and it adds to the character and helps the reader understand what the character is like, which I think is good.

It really ticks me off when people say anyone who swears must be rude, unintelligent and arrgoant or ignorant. I am none of these.

I'm not one of those who think those things of people who swear at all.

BUT, I still don't think it should be taught in schools. It really doesn't belong in the curriculum to me. As Encore said, it doesn't serve a purpose for academic growth.

interstellardave
08-09-09, 18:01
Swear words in school? I'm not sure about that!

I have a large vocabulary, however, and can express myself quite well without swearing... but it is also true that there are times when swear words are the very best way to express something. They are often both apt descriptions of a feeling as well as being short and to the point.

tranniversary119
08-09-09, 19:14
Why not? The teachers in my school already swear so not like it matters.

just croft
08-09-09, 21:36
Disgusting excrement of roman empire;
Slobber of invasions; Dirty saline
of atlantic sewer; Ridiculous face
of mud, of greed, and of vileness,
of pettiness, of short ignorance;
land of slaves, ass up listening to
creak in the fog the nau “do Encoberto”;
Land of workmen and whores,
Affectious all to the miracle, chaste
In the free hours of occult disease;
Land of heros at the weight of gold and blood,
And saints with balcony of dry and wet
In the bottom of virtude; sad land
Quiet at the sunlight, tawdry, creep,
Full of friendly people for foreigners,
Who leave coins and transport fleas,
Oh lusitanean fleas, throughout Europe;
Land of monuments where the people
signs its’ ****ty anonymity;
Museum-land where it still lives,
With pigs in the street, in celtiberian houses;
Land of such sentimental poets,
That the smell of an armpit puts them tripping.
Land of meatless stones, dry
Like those feeling of eight centuries
Of stealing and masters, barons or counts;
Oh land of no one, no one, no one:
I belong to you. You’re a *****, you’re dirty,
You’re more than ***** for the rut,
You’re plague and hunger and war and heart pain.
I belong to you but being mine, no.

Jorge de Sena in "To Portugal" - partialy translated


First of all I'd like to say that this translation was really hard to do, so everything might not be exactly as it should be but the intention of the words is there - that's what I fought more for while translating.

A bit of a back story: this was the poet about whom I had to present a work for Portuguese class. He had a tough time with Portugal due to the fact that at the time the country was under a dictatorship. He spent most of his live in exile, and therefor the hatred for the country

I'd qualify this in three words as obscene, brave and emotional.

my question for all of you who said no to profanity inside class: Should something like this piece of poetry not be aloud to be taught in school?

jackles
08-09-09, 21:41
Well Chaucer is taught and there is the use of some very basic words in the fourteenth century work. But that is usually at A level. so it depends on the maturity of the students. But it is an illusion that children don't swear. They just don't do it in front of the adults. (Well except the little ones who don't know any better) I have been called all sorts at work.

Encore
08-09-09, 22:30
my question for all of you who said no to profanity inside class: Should something like this piece of poetry not be aloud to be taught in school?

Again that's not the issue. As I understand, the idea is to teach specifically the curse language, out of context, regardless of literary works.

just croft
08-09-09, 22:50
Again that's not the issue. As I understand, the idea is to teach specifically the curse language, out of context, regardless of literary works.

Sure, but you can't understand the literary works unless you know all the means the specific word can have. These are words with more than one meaning depending on the context. Some of those meanings you can learn (and you do) outside class, but you don't learn all of them and there are certainly a lot of kids that try to drive away from that kind of language and there know no meaning at all.


ps - I think I just overused the word :vlol:

Apathetic
08-09-09, 22:52
Just to further clarify my earlier post:

Profanity has become so integrated into everyday society that it might very well be perceived as the norm by societies' youth. It is abundant in movies, music, and text (both internet and RL) to the point where maybe youngsters see it as an acceptable practice in today's society. I see it all the time where many speak profanities as if it's normal practice in everyday conversation to the extent where they might not be fully aware of the fact that they are even using such language and how offensive it can be to those around them.

That is why I say teaching in the respect of awareness can be a very good thing. While you would think that they would already be aware and know better, it's not always the case. And while parents would most likely seem the appropiate teachers of this awareness as with other things such as sex, drugs, etc., many of those same parents might actually be setting bad examples of such things in the first place, thus more exposure to the kids.

Exactly. :)

Squibbly
08-09-09, 22:55
@just croft: If something is being taught that has profanity in it, I don't see a problem with it being explained. But I think the point here is more teaching profanity on its own, not just to outline the meaning of something else that swearing is a part of. There's no merit in teaching profanity alone.

Like... "Hey, kids! Today, we're going to learn about the words **** and *****. Now pay attention, there will be a test!"

:p

Encore
08-09-09, 23:13
Sure, but you can't understand the literary works unless you know all the means the specific word can have. These are words with more than one meaning depending on the context. Some of those meanings you can learn (and you do) outside class, but you don't learn all of them and there are certainly a lot of kids that try to drive away from that kind of language and there know no meaning at all.


ps - I think I just overused the word :vlol:

That's crazy. By that logic we would need specific classes for all kinds of vocabulary...

just croft
08-09-09, 23:25
That's crazy. By that logic we would need specific classes for all kinds of vocabulary...

It has nothing to do it that. All I'm saying is that words have lots of meaning. If one specific word comes up in a literary text, it might be a big problem (depending on the text is about - but let's use peoms such as that one as an exemple) that the class does not know the meaning.

Lemme give you an exemple. I hope it's ok to show since the censor is just going to cover up the bad language and everyone can see which word I'm talking about by looking at the meanings rather than the word. (I cut out the exemple though to make the usage of the word to a minimum) It's a direct copy from wiktionary, btw.

*****


(usually humorous or archaic (http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Appendix:Glossary#archaic)) A female (http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/female) dog (http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/dog) or other canine (http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/canine). In particular one who has recently had puppies (http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/puppy).
(vulgar (http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Appendix:Glossary#vulgar), derogatory) A female who is malicious (http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/malicious), spiteful (http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/spiteful), unbearable (http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/unbearable), intrusive (http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/intrusive), or obnoxious (http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/obnoxious).
(vulgar (http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Appendix:Glossary#vulgar), derogatory) By extension, a man with any of these qualities, especially a gay man (suggesting his behavior is womanly) or a man who is dishonorable, cowardly, spineless, whiny, or otherwise behaves in a manner unbecoming a man
(humorous, slang (http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Appendix:Glossary#slang), used with a possessive pronoun (http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/possessive_pronoun), usually between women, between gay men and between women and gay men) Friend.
An angry retort directed to a close buddy.
A person in an unfavorable, undesirable position.
A person who is made to adopt a submissive role in a relationship.
(slang (http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Appendix:Glossary#slang)) A complaint (http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/complaint).
(slang (http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Appendix:Glossary#slang), usually only used in the singular) A difficult or confounding problem (http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/problem).
(slang (http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Appendix:Glossary#slang)) A queen (http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/queen) (the playing card (http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/playing_card))



This was the easiest word profane word I could think of in the English language with obvious multiple meaning. Now imagine the same for harder words when used in things like poetry... everyone knows how poets can really make a salad out of different meanings.

Encore
08-09-09, 23:27
It has nothing to do it that. All I'm saying is that words have lots of meaning. If one specific word comes up in a literary text, it might be a big problem (depending on the text is about - but let's use peoms such as that one as an exemple) that the class does not know the meaning.


But you keep missing the point. There's nothing wrong with explaining a particular word when it comes up during a lesson. It's completely diferent to have entire lessons devoted ONLY to explaining those words.

just croft
08-09-09, 23:33
But you keep missing the point. There's nothing wrong with explaining a particular word when it comes up during a lesson. It's completely diferent to have entire lessons devoted ONLY to explaining those words.

No one said anything about entire lessons, only if weather or not the teacher should explain them.

Stopping the class of five seconds to say the meaning of a word that appears in a text, is in my opinion, explaining them.

Encore
08-09-09, 23:38
Well, by "teaching" profanity I understand having classes about it. Explaining is not the same thing.

They do mention "regularly teaching about "bad" American English" so I assume it would be like I say.

And you know, the american school system has a bad reputation as it is. How about the sort of people who bother to make these ideas focus on more useful ones?..

Tonyrobinson
08-09-09, 23:50
Reminds me of the South Park Movie,

Instead of ass we say buns like ...

]{eith
09-09-09, 00:17
I swear all the time. I'm an intelligent person with a wide range of vocabulary and swear just because it's a habit of mine. I really have no problem with swear words. They're just words and I think if used in the right context, they really don't bother me. We're reading a book in English, where there's quite a few swear words and it adds to the character and helps the reader understand what the character is like, which I think is good.

It really ticks me off when people say anyone who swears must be rude, unintelligent and arrgoant or ignorant. I am none of these.

I coudln't agree more. :tmb:

Tommy123
09-09-09, 00:46
I dont see the point. All kids learn and say them.

Paddy
09-09-09, 01:28
I swear all the time. I'm an intelligent person with a wide range of vocabulary and swear just because it's a habit of mine. I really have no problem with swear words. They're just words and I think if used in the right context, they really don't bother me. We're reading a book in English, where there's quite a few swear words and it adds to the character and helps the reader understand what the character is like, which I think is good.

It really ticks me off when people say anyone who swears must be rude, unintelligent and arrgoant or ignorant. I am none of these.

I agree with Nannonxray, sure swearing seems inappropriate but it does have a funny way of relieving anger when you stuff up or when something is frustrating.

ihatecold17
09-09-09, 02:07
I swear all the time. I'm an intelligent person with a wide range of vocabulary and swear just because it's a habit of mine. I really have no problem with swear words. They're just words and I think if used in the right context, they really don't bother me. We're reading a book in English, where there's quite a few swear words and it adds to the character and helps the reader understand what the character is like, which I think is good.

It really ticks me off when people say anyone who swears must be rude, unintelligent and arrgoant or ignorant. I am none of these.

Let me just say something: I don't know if this was directed at me ( I did say i think swearing can be ignorance) However, I don't think everyone who swears is ignorant. I think it can be intelligence if used correctly or cleverly, but a large majority of the people I have experience with who swear pretty much swear in every sentance. A vast amount of different versions of **** or whatever they want to say to the point where if you actually think about it, the sentence doesn't make sense. I personally do not swear unless I am very angry or quoting somebody or reading in class. People tend to know that if I swear I mean business lol. I do think it helps show character like in Huckleberry Finn, though it was difficult to get through, the language did tell a lot about the characters. I do believe that while it can be effective, it isn't necessary. I just prefer against the teaching of them. I don't think that something generally accepted as bad should be taught to kids. I think they should have understanding of what they mean and that they shouldn't be used outside of moderation

aileenwuornos
09-09-09, 03:05
If you're really good at swearing, you don't need anyone to teach you.
You teach yourself.
I learned some interesting words at a young age because I read.

IceColdLaraCroft
09-09-09, 03:12
:cen: yes

EmeraldFields
09-09-09, 03:14
If you're really good at swearing, you don't need anyone to teach you.
You teach yourself.
I learned some interesting words at a young age because I read.

Reading really does expand your vocabulary!:mis:

aileenwuornos
09-09-09, 03:20
Reading really does expand your vocabulary!:mis:

And your mind!

scoopy_loopy
09-09-09, 06:05
Children learn profanity perfectly fine without any 'scholastic' help. Profanity shouldnt be taught or approved by our learning institutions. Its a disgusting way to tarnish the tradition of learning.

gbetch
09-09-09, 06:15
would some answer me something, before i start ranting, why is there "bad" words? How can a word be bad, its a word. The problem seems more to be with socioty and how easily offended people get. There is one word, which i cannot say here, that is perhaps the most versitile word ever! It is a word that I know i have never been able to figure out why it is offensive either. I can not tell you how many times I got intyo arguments with people because i used one of these "bad" words and they thought that they would jump up on there high horse and try to run me down even if my statement was not acctuly offensive.

so someone explain to me why there is "bad words"

dizzydoil
09-09-09, 06:39
I cannot stand the use of improper English, therefore, I say no. ;)
:tmb:.

scoopy_loopy
09-09-09, 06:42
so someone explain to me why there is "bad words"

Why are there "bad symbols"? :rolleyes:

just croft
09-09-09, 10:44
Why are there "bad symbols"? :rolleyes:

:confused: of course, need I show you a few?