PDA

View Full Version : Views on Autism and it's Spectrum


Elmer
13-09-09, 13:14
Hey everyone:)

On one of my strolls across the internet I came across a poster_ I won't post it here, it's property of a deviantArtist_ which stated: "HELP US CURE AUTISM NOW!" For me this seemed to be a rather curious statement made by someone who didn't really know what Autism is...
This stimulated me to start a thread about our views on autism, what is it? Could it be cured? Do you yourself have some form of autism?
Feel free to discuss:)

Later on I'll present my opinion in a more articulate manner.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Autism

(Wikipedia on Autism.)

jackles
13-09-09, 13:20
I have worked with a few kids who are autistic within varying degrees of the spectrum. Also did a course on it at work. You can't 'cure' or 'get rid' off autism but you can help with creating coping strategys and the use of animals has been shown to help postively in some cases (in helping children to open out). It just depends on how good people are at coping with their life and assimilating with the rest of the world.

Super Badnik
13-09-09, 13:25
I never thought Autism was something that could be cured. :confused:
Has there ever been a case where someone has been cured? Because it seems very unlikely to me.

TRhalloween
13-09-09, 14:00
I never thought Autism was something that could be cured. :confused:
Has there ever been a case where someone has been cured? Because it seems very unlikely to me.

I don't think so since it's not a disease. It's more like a personality.

Elmer
13-09-09, 14:37
It is a fact, not only that autism cannot be cured, it also isn't something to be cured, as it isn't a disease, however it could cause dis-ease for the people who have to cope with it.
I myself have autism too, Asperger to be more precise, and the school that I attend to, is one for people with autism or something lying within the autism spectrum. From Classic Autism, to Asperger's syndrom, and PDD-nos, they are represented there.
And sometimes it strikes us how strange for example the media seems to presents us. just look at certain websites, where indeed they say they are in search for a cure.
There seem to be even people who think that autists are dumb, stupid, or just weird and therefore unnice. (Or something worse than that.) Because of films like Rainman, (Which was made, I believe, for the purpose of making people aware, and to explain what autism is.) a image full of misconceptions about autism is created. It's not that I deny that autism can cause extreme problems for the ones having it, but some people seem to believe that autism, without exception, is a disease that causes people to be incomprehensable, dumb, or extremely and always anti-social.

It's that image of autism that I think isn't true, but nevertheless believed in by certain people.

Paddy
13-09-09, 14:39
Apologies if it sounds ignorant but having aspergers myself what are the main differences between that and autism??
I aint 100% understanding of either condition despite being told I got one of them.

adventurerLara
13-09-09, 14:43
I don't know enough about it to have a well informed opinion, to be honest.

Minty Mouth
13-09-09, 14:49
I don't know enough about it to have a well informed opinion, to be honest.

Same :/

One of my friends has Aspergers, but I had no idea until he told me.

WCookie
13-09-09, 15:19
Same :/


This is Asperger's:
Asperger syndrome is an autism spectrum disorder, and people with it therefore show significant difficulties in social interaction, along with restricted and repetitive patterns of behavior and interests. It differs from other autism spectrum disorders by its relative preservation of linguistic and cognitive development. Although not required for diagnosis, physical clumsiness and atypical use of language are frequently reported.

Asperger syndrome is also called Asperger's syndrome, Asperger (or Asperger's) disorder, or just Asperger's. It is named after the Austrian pediatrician Hans Asperger who, in 1944, described children in his practice who lacked nonverbal communication skills, demonstrated limited empathy with their peers, and were physically clumsy. Fifty years later, it was standardized as a diagnosis, but questions about many aspects remain. For example, there is lingering doubt about whether it is distinct from high-functioning autism (HFA); partly because of this, its prevalence is not firmly established. The exact cause is unknown, although research supports the likelihood of a genetic basis; brain imaging techniques have not identified a clear common pathology.

There is no single treatment, and the effectiveness of particular interventions is supported by only limited data. Intervention is aimed at improving symptoms and function. The mainstay of management is behavioral therapy, focusing on specific deficits to address poor communication skills, obsessive or repetitive routines, and physical clumsiness. Most individuals improve over time, but difficulties with communication, social adjustment and independent living continue into adulthood. Some researchers and people with Asperger's have advocated a shift in attitudes toward the view that it is a difference, rather than a disability that must be treated or cured.


This is autism:
The autism spectrum, also called autism spectrum disorders (ASD) or autism spectrum conditions (ASC), with the word autistic sometimes replacing autism, is a spectrum of psychological conditions characterized by widespread abnormalities of social interactions and communication, as well as severely restricted interests and highly repetitive behavior.

The three main forms of ASD are:
Autism
Asperger syndrome
Pervasive Developmental Disorder Not Otherwise Specified (PDD-NOS), sometimes called atypical autism.

Autism forms the core of the autism spectrum disorders. Asperger syndrome is closest to autism in signs and likely causes; unlike autism, people with Asperger syndrome have no significant delay in language development. PDD-NOS is diagnosed when the criteria are not met for a more specific disorder. Some sources also include Rett syndrome and childhood disintegrative disorder, which share several signs with autism but may have unrelated causes; other sources combine ASD with these two conditions into the pervasive developmental disorders.

The terminology of autism can be bewildering. Autism, Asperger syndrome and PDD-NOS are sometimes called the autistic disorders instead of ASD, whereas autism itself is often called autistic disorder, childhood autism, or infantile autism. Although the older term pervasive developmental disorder and the newer term autism spectrum disorder largely or entirely overlap, the former was intended to describe a specific set of diagnostic labels, whereas the latter refers to a postulated spectrum disorder linking various conditions. ASD, in turn, is a subset of the broader autism phenotype (BAP), which describes individuals who may not have ASD but do have autistic-like traits, such as avoiding eye contact.

Encore
13-09-09, 15:33
I watched a documentary about kids with severe autism and it seemed to me that it was absolute hell for their parents. Not that they don't love their kids all the same, they do, but it seems so tiring and depressive for them. Also, for possible brothers and sisters that aren't autist.

If it doesn't really have a "cure", well I don't know, but it should be dealt with and people should try their best to reverse it. Depression and Schizophrenia are also diseases that technically have no cure, that doesn't mean we should just accept them.

sheepydee
13-09-09, 16:08
Forgive my rudeness... but i dont quite understand... what is Austism? like a sort of friend of mine his name is hamish has autism but i dont quite get it :confused: could someone enlighten me?

IvanaKC
13-09-09, 16:19
Autism = not illness, but it's case, shape of a mind where person is living in his world. People who has autism are very often EXPERTS in one area (maths, botanic....), but hardly understand world around them.




You can get rid of it, but rare parents are ready to pass that process. You can "get rid" of autism when a child is around 5 years old. Otherwise, how child is growing it's getting harder and harder and then impossible.

Elmer
13-09-09, 16:49
Ivana, I don't think that it's true that autism can be cured, no matter how hard we try, and how early we start trying:) What is possible though is that it gets less and less notice-able... that's what happened with me. When I was really little I was a really quiet, closed, and shy kid_ one of the drawbacks of autism_ but that's over now:)
I'm still a bit shy, but it's now no longer a problem at all, it grew to be part of who I am. You know? If I could get rid of my autism, I wouldn't want too:)

TRfan23
13-09-09, 16:50
I LOVE Autistic people they're brilliant :D A friend of my parent's had a daughter who's autistic ;) She's ever so sweet, loves hugging people :)

I don't treat it like an illness, I treat it like a rare blessing in a way, for the person at least :)

Not a single Autistic person I know of, doesn't like being Autistic. I'm not saying everyone should be Autistic, but Autistic people can be really sweet and adorable :) Not to mention intelligent as people have noted here :)

jackles
13-09-09, 17:23
There are different degrees of autism...from the child who will literally do what ever you ask. (Watching a kid like this learn to swim was amazing..no matter what the instructor said, they did exactly what they were asked...because their way of dealing with the world was to follow instructions in a literal sense), there are other children whose view of the world was much more black and white and reacted aggressively when things went wrong or unexpected things happen. There are some children who may just seem a little quiet and withdrawn or like their pencils lined up in a special order and get anxious if they are messed up. Of course there are some children who show extreme behaviours but there are many much milder forms.

Like I said as kids get older then their understanding of how the world works improves. Strategies for coping become better and tbh there are loads of adults who have tendencies towards behaviour that could be classed on the autistic spectrum.

Uzi master
13-09-09, 19:36
well I have autism, what type I don't know but eally curing someone of autism sounds more like that whole sterotyphical christian who push there rilegions on other people and don't accept them for who they are, and by that I meant STEREOTYPHICAL just to make that clear, so what if I'm better at math, or don't act the same as everyone else does its who people are not some kind of illness.

I might as well mention the richest man in the world has autism...

jackles
13-09-09, 19:48
This is a really good site (http://www.nas.org.uk/autism) explaining about autism and has links for aspergers as well.

Is there a cure?

At present, there is no 'cure' for autism. However, there is a range of interventions - methods of enabling learning and development - which people may find to be helpful. Many of these are detailed on our website: www.autism.org.uk/approaches
From the site:The National Autistic Society

Johnnay
13-09-09, 21:07
I have worked with a few kids who are autistic within varying degrees of the spectrum. Also did a course on it at work. You can't 'cure' or 'get rid' off autism but you can help with creating coping strategys and the use of animals has been shown to help postively in some cases (in helping children to open out). It just depends on how good people are at coping with their life and assimilating with the rest of the world.

yeahhhhhhh but if they want social skills, self confidence and esteem skills autistic ppl have to live by themselves and attend classes. like me. i wish to live by myself i feel much better. living with parents you dont feel that way

Apologies if it sounds ignorant but having aspergers myself what are the main differences between that and autism??
I aint 100% understanding of either condition despite being told I got one of them.

aspergers is a better form of autism, thats all i know

Larson_1988
13-09-09, 21:08
aspergers is a better form of autism, thats all i know
I've seen people with asbergers who are affected by it on the same degree as people with autism.

Elmer
13-09-09, 22:07
"Better" sounds like a strange word to use in this context.

Ikas90
14-09-09, 01:45
I have Aspergers, and my sister has Autism. When we were younger, we were both very difficult to handle. Over time though, we have both improved as we grew up. My sister still can't talk, but I'm now pretty much a normal person. :)

Aspergers affected me mostly as a child, and I'll be happy to post the interview I had with a TRF member:

How would you describe Asperger Syndrome?

I would descrice Asperger Syndrome as a condition which affects the way we interact socially with other people and the way we adapt to every day living. It's a mild condition that falls along the autistic spectrum. While more serious at a young age, by the time most people become adults, the condition is no longer easily visible.

How did your condition affect your social life?

Quite a lot. In my early years, I would never talk to the people around me. I always preferred to be alone. It affected me pretty badly until I was able to overcome all problems which Aspergers had caused me. Speaking to other people was the major problem, and because I wasn't able to socialise as well as normal kids, I began to feel depressed quite quickly, realising that I will have to start talking if I am to have a successful future.

How did you found out you had Asperger Syndrome?

My parents told me when I was diagnosed. I did not fully understand straight away, however. It was only a few years later that I began to understand and study the condition more in-depth. I was proud to have something unique, but at the same time, depressed. Proud because it made me more sensible and prone to accepting drugs or alcohol, but depressed because it affected my social life.

How did you cope with this?

At first, it was very hard to cope. A lot of the time, I was bullied and couldn't cope with it. But as I grew up and learned to understand the value of life, I wasn't at all intimidated. I was who I was. If anyone made fun of me, I would laugh along. But that was when I was close to overcoming my selective-mute condition.

Tell me someone of your characteristics related with Asperger Syndrome.

I have not met anyone in person who has the same condition as me. I do know a few people from this forum with it, though.

I read that Asperger is a type of Autism, did you also have the same symptoms with Austism such as delayed reading or repetitive behaviour?

Yes, it's a mild form of Autism. When I was much younger, I had many of the symptoms of someone with full autism, but my understanding was close to normal. I would often do repetitive behaviour, but I understood everyone perfectly fine. People with a severe case of Autism can't even speak, or understand. My sister is an example. She has Autism, and can't talk. Though she understands some things expressed through actions; e.g. pointing.

Did Asperger Syndrome make school hard for you?

I wasn't able to get good grades at school all the time, but I don't think I would blame that on Aspergers. That had much more to do with motivation or discipline, as it is with normal people. I was just lazy. Not exactly dumb. I was quite bright, actually.

Your sister had austism? So did this mean that Autism runs through the family?

Yes, Autism can be a genetic trait common among families. Saying that though, me and my sister are the only ones with cases of Autism in our entire family.

How exactly did you overcome your selective mutism?

It was the hardest thing in the world to do. I wouldn't have been able to do it without the help of a psychologist. He helped me raise confidence in little steps at a time. Eventually I was confident enough to start speaking to everyone I know. Though very difficult. I am glad I have finally overcome it.

So, you were depressed. Is this common for someone with Asperger Syndrome?

I think it's common for a lot of people, to be honest. The one other guy I know that has Aspergers has said he's been depressed. My dad would agree that depression is common in Aspergers as well. I would think it's mainly because of our social impairment.