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Solice
14-10-09, 01:17
As we all know, the USA and England are two countries separated by a common language. In fact, all English-speaking countries have their oddities. So what are they?

I wonder if the English actually still use the term, 'Bloody' the same way Americans say 'Crap'. 'Bloody' seems like a very old word. These kind of ‘just stubbed your toe’ words change over time.

So if an Englishman goes to New Zealand, will he understand all they say there?
Or an American in Ireland. Will she say, 'What the hell you just say?'
Or an Australian in inner city New York, finding he has a big language barrier?


Watch this...

3UgpfSp2t6k

irjudd
14-10-09, 01:23
Chuck Norris doesn't stub his toe, he accidentally destroys tables and chairs.

Angel666
14-10-09, 01:58
I think you would be able to get around fine in those situations. There might be some confusion with names for things, trunk for the back of the car in America, I believe it's called a Boot in the UK, slang, and stuff like that. And you might have some difficulty understanding the accents but overall you shouldn't have too much trouble.

patriots88888
14-10-09, 02:14
I believe certain expressions can be the most difficult of the language barriers to cross. All depends on the familiarity of said expression. I learned many new English phrases and expressions just from listening to Who and Beatles' songs. Pete Townshend used them quite frequently throughout his early songwriting years with the former mentioned band.

'I look bloody tall but my heels are high...', from the song Substitute by The Who.

'And the banker never wears a mack. In the pouring rain, very strange..., from the song Penny Lane by The Beatles. LOL.

LaraLuvrrr
14-10-09, 02:25
that lady scares me 0_0

gbetch
14-10-09, 03:12
the only problem i ever had is when some one is speaking fas in a really thick accent and you can barely understand them. What is funny is if i play TR, watch a Harry Potter movie or just watch the BBC to long i start talking in an english accent. I also use some word that the english use but americas don't, like, bloody, bugger, or OI!

Johnnay
14-10-09, 03:22
the only problem i ever had is when some one is speaking fas in a really thick accent and you can barely understand them. What is funny is if i play TR, watch a Harry Potter movie or just watch the BBC to long i start talking in an english accent. I also use some word that the english use but americas don't, like, bloody, bugger, or OI!

But bloody, bugger and oi are mainly aussie slang rather than British( or the same)

tbh how about Aussie English. It fits in.... right

violentblossom
14-10-09, 03:30
I can typically understand most accents I hear, although I sometimes struggles with Northern English from a few Brit friends.

Ikas90
14-10-09, 03:36
Our Australian language is horrible and barely understandable.

Johnnay
14-10-09, 04:04
Our Australian language is horrible and barely understandable.

The Queenslandish accent is the one which is annoying to understand out of all the accents here:)
because I heard that they speak jibberish:)

Mad Tony
14-10-09, 06:14
I can typically understand most accents I hear, although I sometimes struggles with Northern English from a few Brit friends.So do I! :vlol: :p

drakl0r
14-10-09, 06:34
Have anyone heard of Manglish? (Malaysian English :D)

Even though I speak quite fluent in English, there are some hints of my native tongue accent, and I just can't help it lol :p

Another Lara
14-10-09, 07:51
Our Australian language is horrible and barely understandable.

Just like the English Essex accent, which is probably where yours derives from lol! ;)

Luckily I never inherited the Essex accent and sound more cockney! :whi:

I sometimes have a problem understanding really strong northern english accents, or Scottish, but that's usually coz the people I talk to from those areas are too lazy to open their mouths more to form their words properly !

spikejones
14-10-09, 08:00
neo.. I mean judderman... your from SC right? Now, thats not to far south of me in NC, but I swear that lady got the SC accent all wrong. I don't hear many folks out here in Raleigh sounding like that. Now, out in Duplin County perhaps, but not really in Raleigh.

Croft_Original
14-10-09, 08:44
I believe certain expressions can be the most difficult of the language barriers to cross. All depends on the familiarity of said expression. I learned many new English phrases and expressions just from listening to Who and Beatles' songs. Pete Townshend used them quite frequently throughout his early songwriting years with the former mentioned band.

'I look bloody tall but my heels are high...', from the song Substitute by The Who.

'And the banker never wears a mack. In the pouring rain, very strange..., from the song Penny Lane by The Beatles. LOL.

My sister used to have a Beatles song book that had Penny Lane in it and I always thought it was funny that there was an explanation for the meaning of mac.:D


As for words like bloody and bugger, English people I know definately still use them. Um...maybe I'm one of them.;):p


Croft.

Johnnay
14-10-09, 09:25
I was born a new south welsh person so I have hints of that too

Adelaideans( ppl in South Australia) their accent is very different to the rest of Australia simply because it has a European touch/ flavour

Changeling
14-10-09, 09:27
I sometimes have a problem understanding really strong northern english accents, or Scottish, but that's usually coz the people I talk to from those areas are too lazy to open their mouths more to form their words properly !

Or it was because we were raised in an environment where words are spoken that way and can't help it, whatever... :whi:

Lara's Nemesis
14-10-09, 09:32
Couple of differently used words.

****ed: Drunk (UK) Angry (US)
Pants: Underwear (UK) Trousers (US)

Any combination of the above is not a good idea. :ohn:

I also have a bit of a soft spot for the way Americans pronounce Aluminium.:D

patriots88888
14-10-09, 09:35
I also have a bit of a soft spot for the way Americans pronounce Aluminium.:D

And how might that be? Aluminium or Aluminum? :p

Lara's Nemesis
14-10-09, 09:43
And how might that be? Aluminium or Aluminum? :p

Lol, I suppose I'll have to let you off seen as an America invented the product.

Aloomanum:D

Keir_Eidos
14-10-09, 10:04
A lot of English people (like me) have a certain snobbery over the English language and how it's been butchered by our State-side and our Antipodean cousins (tongue in cheek here) :D

I've since read that some American-English is actually an older and purer form of the language than it's modern English-English counterpart.

When settlers arrived on the American continent centuries ago they took the English language as it was spoken in the British Isles at the time. Some of those terms lived on in the US but have since died out over here in the UK. So parts of American-English that I'd turn my nose up at and refuse to use as it's not 'correct' are actually older than the English-English I use. One example: apparently the term 'bug' was in common use over here in the 1600's, but has since been replaced by the more modern word 'insect' in the UK.

Lara's Nemesis
14-10-09, 10:11
You're right, there is definetely snobbery involved when looking at American/English.

Bug was just too easy, we had to have a more complicated word.:p

Nannonxyay
14-10-09, 10:24
I love the UK English language. The spelling looks prettier and in some circumstances, when American English speakers say certain things, it doesn't actually make grammatical sense. Plus I love the good ol' UK words like Bloody. I say that loads. :D

MiCkiZ88
14-10-09, 10:28
I'm western european and there was only one british accent that sounded like mumbling.. Others I understood perfectly. Funny though, me and Mitch were talking about different accents few days ago and we came to the conclusion Some europeans (like dutch, and swedes) have the most understandable english. Weird or not? Perhaps we don't just use any accent or just a combination of british and american accents.

Keir_Eidos
14-10-09, 10:28
You're right, there is definetely snobbery involved when looking at American/English.

Bug was just too easy, we had to have a more complicated word.:p

Hehe yeah, I'm guilty of it. But that said I *love* the American accent.

I love the UK English language. The spelling looks prettier and in some circumstances, when American English speakers say certain things, it doesn't actually make grammatical sense. Plus I love the good ol' UK words like Bloody. I say that loads. :D

Although I love just about every American accent there is, I get a bit peeved at what as I see as lazy grammar sometimes used in the US, but I guess the appeal and charm of American-English is that it's more functional, practical and direct.

jaywalker
14-10-09, 10:34
Games are usually developed with US english, for sake of `bigger market`. However years ago we did a game called Warzone 2100 which at one point altered any `USified` words into the proper UK english spelling.. so if you typed `armored` or `localize` it appeared on screen as `armoured` and `localise` :)

I am a northerner with a dodgy muddled accent but speak at a speed that needs dick tracy to slow down and listen to.

Cochrane
14-10-09, 11:14
Having learnt british english in school, and american english through TV, movies and the internet, I think I can understand most english pretty well. Except for the scottish accent, that is. Damn, that's horrible. :D

It's also funny to hear germans talk english. In many cases, you can tell the region they're from pretty well even in other languages. In many other cases, they just horribly suck at it...

scoopy_loopy
14-10-09, 11:19
Australian isnt so bad if we're trying to be polite. If we're talking as we would to friends, americans in particular, have trouble understanding.

Also, people from outside Australia generally hate and get really confused by the fact that we "go up" at the end of each sentance. As if we added a "?" to everything.

My good friend, who is originally from Switzerland, often awkwardly answered "statements" when he was on exchange here. It was cute :p

"The weather awesome today."
"eh... yes the weather is good?"

Made me giggle, anyway :D


But then, there are many accents to Australia, and not all of them do that. Some people sound almost English - only ... not? Whereas other people can have this horrible trawl, especially the classic stereotypical "Workin' class Aussie guy" :p

Im from Queensland originally, and Ive found that alot of people in the city I now live in (which is in New South Wales) occasionally pronouce words completely different. As well as slang and other things, of course.

Lemmie
14-10-09, 13:17
Having learnt british english in school, and american english through TV, movies and the internet, I think I can understand most english pretty well. Except for the scottish accent, that is. Damn, that's horrible. :D


*scratches Cochrane's eyes out*

Interestingly, Scottish accents facilitates the learning of German. Lots of similar sounds.

Mad Tony
14-10-09, 13:19
I mean no offense here but I honestly think people from other countries (Poland or India whatever) are just as easy to understand, if not easier, than Scottish people. :p I'm sorry but that accent is just so alien to me.

irjudd
14-10-09, 13:19
neo.. I mean judderman... your from SC right? Now, thats not to far south of me in NC, but I swear that lady got the SC accent all wrong. I don't hear many folks out here in Raleigh sounding like that. Now, out in Duplin County perhaps, but not really in Raleigh.
I've certainly heard that sound before, but I'd be more inclined to think it's an Alabama or Virginia accent.

In my area, I hear accents more akin to Dr. Phil and the guy from Sling Blade.

Another Lara
14-10-09, 13:20
I am a northerner with a dodgy muddled accent but speak at a speed that needs dick tracy to slow down and listen to.


That's becuase you have so much to say and so little time to say it! ;)

Angel666
14-10-09, 13:30
neo.. I mean judderman... your from SC right? Now, thats not to far south of me in NC, but I swear that lady got the SC accent all wrong. I don't hear many folks out here in Raleigh sounding like that. Now, out in Duplin County perhaps, but not really in Raleigh.

Even though I am not irjudd, I would like to respond too. :) I live in SC as well and the accents can change from the mountains to the low country and also depends on the persons individual background. Up in the mountains you get more of the typical country accent that I can't hardly understand, and down by the coast where Charleston is, you can get that accent. It varies a lot and I've only heard it once or twice though.

Lemmie
14-10-09, 13:45
About this video on the OP, I disagree that all her accents are that amazing. The Scottish one in particular wasn't great.

However, some were really good.

violentblossom
14-10-09, 13:45
In my area, I hear accents more akin to Dr. Phil and the guy from Sling Blade.



That's funny, because Phil is Texan. :p

Changeling
14-10-09, 14:01
C'mon, the Scottish accent isn't that bad. :p

Lemmie
14-10-09, 14:04
C'mon, the Scottish accent isn't that bad. :p

It's definitely not one I recognise, and I've heard quite a few. :D

Maybe it's just meant to be a general Scottish one. There's certainly a variation in the quality of her accents.

irjudd
14-10-09, 14:17
That's funny, because Phil is Texan. :p

So's your face.

violentblossom
14-10-09, 14:19
So's your face.

Funny or Texan? :mad:

irjudd
14-10-09, 14:22
Funny or Texan? :mad:

Yes. :)

tombofwinston
14-10-09, 14:41
C'mon, the Scottish accent isn't that bad. :p

O Realy :whi:
I don't really have an accent :( .

Mad Tony
14-10-09, 14:46
irjudd, once again you have not failed to amuse me! :tmb: :vlol:

Sorry violentblossom :p :(

Joely-Moley
14-10-09, 15:31
I found coming to Scotland from the states and understanding what lot of people were saying to me very difficult.

I've found that most of Scottish people talk a lot faster than what I'm used to. Also especially in and around Glasgow a lot of people use slang words which took quite a bit of getting used to. :p

Mad Tony
14-10-09, 15:33
Talking of hard to understand Scottish accents... :whi:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/scotland/glasgow_and_west/8306582.stm

http://newsimg.bbc.co.uk/media/images/46545000/jpg/_46545590_weegiead466by300.jpg

Changeling
14-10-09, 15:34
It's definitely not one I recognise, and I've heard quite a few. :D

Maybe it's just meant to be a general Scottish one. There's certainly a variation in the quality of her accents.

Oh no, I meant that the Scottish accent in general isn't that bad. :p But up north we have a strong dialect which people find difficult to understand. People often think I'm Irish for some reason. XD

Joely-Moley
14-10-09, 15:48
Talking of hard to understand Scottish accents... :whi:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/scotland/glasgow_and_west/8306582.stm

http://newsimg.bbc.co.uk/media/images/46545000/jpg/_46545590_weegiead466by300.jpg

:vlol:!

I had to get my girlfriend to translate for me a lot of the time. I still don't understand ned speak.

violentblossom
14-10-09, 15:53
Yes. :)

You're dead to me. :(

Cochrane
14-10-09, 15:54
When my family and I were in Scotland, we met only one person (waiter in a Pizza Hut) all of us could understand perfectly right away, without asking him to slow down or thinking about his every sentence for five minutes. And when my parents asked him about that, he replied that he wasn't from Scotland originally and didn't understand the people there either. :D

Tear
14-10-09, 15:56
I love an English accent.:D

Mad Tony
14-10-09, 16:11
:vlol:!

I had to get my girlfriend to translate for me a lot of the time. I still don't understand ned speak.http://tylerdemeo.com/Images/flanders.jpg ?

Hidely ho neighborinos!

jackles
14-10-09, 16:15
Johnnay..... of course we say bloody and bugger...who the hell do you think started saying it in the first bloody place!!!!


:D


*scarpers*

Forwen
14-10-09, 16:29
I absolutely love Scottish accent.

Glaswegian is out of this world though. When I first heard it (unprepared and innocent) I thought they were a bunch of Brits talking in German.

EmeraldFields
14-10-09, 16:33
I love listening to people with different accents!:D

I'm afraid I'm stuck with the General American accent though.:p

violentblossom
14-10-09, 16:37
I'm afraid I'm stuck with the General American accent though.:p

Yeah, that's what I thought about myself, too, 'til Nate told me otherwise. :(

You may think you sound typical, but maybe not. :p

EmeraldFields
14-10-09, 16:38
Yeah, that's what I thought about myself, too, 'til Nate told me otherwise. :(

You may think you sound typical, but maybe not. :p

According to Wikipedia, I live in the "General American region".:p

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/General_American

violentblossom
14-10-09, 16:40
According to Wikipedia, I live in the "General American region".:p

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/General_American

Forget you, then. :ohn:

Chocola teapot
14-10-09, 16:41
I wonder if there is a general english place in the UK?

EmeraldFields
14-10-09, 16:44
Forget you, then. :ohn:

You know you love me.http://img42.imageshack.us/img42/6752/flirta.gif

Ada the Mental
14-10-09, 16:46
Oh, great thread, I can vent my frustration at my Phonetics class.

What is wrong with the "r"? It's such a nice sound, why can't you English people just say it? :ton:

jackles
14-10-09, 16:52
Us southerners stick 'r' in everything.

barth.
carstle
newcarstle
arrrrrrrse.
etc etc.

Mad Tony
14-10-09, 17:05
Us southerners stick 'r' in everything.

barth.
carstle
newcarstle
arrrrrrrse.
etc etc.I avoid saying arse because I think it sounds stupid, but by the same token I don't really say ass either because it makes me sound northern. :p

jackles
14-10-09, 17:13
I don't usually use the word much (the phrase 'move your lazy arse' springs instantly to mind) but I was looking for a word that has a strong 'r' sound. :)

Changeling
14-10-09, 17:30
Up where I live it's not uncommon to call an arse an 'erse', as in, "Move yer erse before a keeck it!". Strange? Yes. Amusing? Oh yes.

Mad Tony
14-10-09, 17:42
Aye me laddie, tis indeed strange. Normally yu unly heer that kind o proonounciation doon sooth :p

Agent 47
14-10-09, 18:15
I avoid saying arse because I think it sounds stupid, but by the same token I don't really say ass either because it makes me sound northern. :p

nothing wrong with being northern :mad: and it's Arse NOT Ass :D

people like to claim the Americans butchered the English language, hate to defend our US friends but.....we English have done a fine good job of butchering it all by ourselves :D we've willingly allowed Americanisms to creep into our language. on top of that we also have a lazy attitude depending on the length of a word (hence all this Should OF, Could OF BS i see people use) wtf does that mean?

"i should OF gone out, i could OF bought this/that"? the word is HAVE folks!!!! no wonder the UK education system is :cen:

as for Scots, well every Scot i've met has been perfectly understandable. :D

can't say i'm fond of posh people though, can't stand the "born with a silver-spoon in mouth" accent, especially the fake ones :mad: "oh lardi dar tally ho old chap"

commoners FTW :jmp:

the class system in 21st century Britain is still alive and well :pi:

igonge
14-10-09, 18:21
or Scottish, but that's usually coz the people I talk to from those areas are too lazy to open their mouths more to form their words properly !

You just described half the population of my school lol.

I was raised to speak properly but these guys just sound drunk all the time. "Aw Nu' dinnea evn goa thar"

Mad Tony
14-10-09, 18:38
nothing wrong with being northern :mad: and it's Arse NOT Ass :D

people like to claim the Americans butchered the English language, hate to defend our US friends but.....we English have done a fine good job of butchering it all by ourselves :D we've willingly allowed Americanisms to creep into our language. on top of that we also have a lazy attitude depending on the length of a word (hence all this Should OF, Could OF BS i see people use) wtf does that mean?

"i should OF gone out, i could OF bought this/that"? the word is HAVE folks!!!! no wonder the UK education system is :cen:

as for Scots, well every Scot i've met has been perfectly understandable. :D

can't say i'm fond of posh people though, can't stand the "born with a silver-spoon in mouth" accent, especially the fake ones :mad: "oh lardi dar tally ho old chap"

commoners FTW :jmp:

the class system in 21st century Britain is still alive and well :pi:I never said it was ass. To be honest I prefer to say neither. :p

You hate posh people yet it if I remember rightly you're a supporter Conservative party where half of the cabinet are how you say "posh" :p? How does that work?

Normal accent FTW :D

Oh, and I think some people get way too serious over the supposed American "butchering" of the English language. Who honestly cares? It's not like things are spelt the American way here so I don't know why everyone complains.

miss.haggard
14-10-09, 18:43
One - That Texas accent was fake as ****.
Two - That lady scares me and needs to let her eyebrows grow out.

Agent 47
14-10-09, 19:19
I never said it was ass. To be honest I prefer to say neither. :p

You hate posh people yet it if I remember rightly you're a supporter Conservative party where half of the cabinet are how you say "posh" :p? How does that work?

Normal accent FTW :D

Oh, and I think some people get way too serious over the supposed American "butchering" of the English language. Who honestly cares? It's not like things are spelt the American way here so I don't know why everyone complains.

not all Tories are posh William Hague is a commoner :D

complaining is the English way. we find almost everything and anything to complain about, tis what we do best :jmp:

Mad Tony
14-10-09, 19:39
What have you got against posh people? Just because they come from better-off backgrounds doesn't make them bad people. :p

Johnnay
14-10-09, 19:44
Johnnay..... of course we say bloody and bugger...who the hell do you think started saying it in the first bloody place!!!!


:D


*scarpers*

Us Aussies say it more better than you pommies would even try and say anything Australian correct

Legends
14-10-09, 19:55
Us southerners stick 'r' in everything.

barth.
carstle
newcarstle
arrrrrrrse.
etc etc.

It sounds so awful. :p Almost as bad as posh-english.

Dennis's Mom
14-10-09, 20:10
What have you got against posh people? Just because they come from better-off backgrounds doesn't make them bad people. :p

"An Englishman's way of speaking absolutely classifies him,
The moment he talks he makes some other Englishman despise him."

Truer words were never sung. :D

]{eith
14-10-09, 20:29
That woman's "Dublin" accent makes me cringe.

jackles
14-10-09, 20:45
It sounds so awful. :p Almost as bad as posh-english.


Luckily we don't even say it in a posh way.....:D





bugger off Johnnay!!! :D

Agent 47
14-10-09, 20:46
What have you got against posh people? Just because they come from better-off backgrounds doesn't make them bad people. :p

they think they are above the law by a simple a flash of the cash. they step on the little people without a care in the world and act like they're gods gift. what's to like about snobs? :D

patriots88888
14-10-09, 20:48
Sorry, but I say 'learned' and not learnt! :ohn:

What's with the 't' at the end of all themz words anyways? :p

Mad Tony
14-10-09, 20:48
they think they are above the law by a simple a flash of the cash. they step on the little people without a care in the world and act like they're gods gift. what's to like about snobs? :DThat's an extremely unfair over-reaching generalization.

Jeez man, if I didn't know better I'd say you were hardcore Labour with that attitude! :p

Agent 47
14-10-09, 20:52
That's an extremely unfair over-reaching generalization.

Jeez man, if I didn't know better I'd say you were hardcore Labour with that attitude! :p

it's my view and i stand by them, some do indeed treat little people as though they're beneath them :(

Labour!!!! it'll be a cold day in hell before i vote Labour :mad: that's just insulting now :( :D

Mad Tony
14-10-09, 20:55
Of course some do, but not all.

Sorry. Yes, that was rather a harsh insult. :p

Agent 47
14-10-09, 21:01
Of course some do, but not all.

Sorry. Yes, that was rather a harsh insult. :p

centuries old grudges FTW :jmp: *higher class robbing off the lower classes by extortionate taxes, and stealing of land) :vlol:

Robin Hood and Dick Turpin had the right idea by robbing from the rich :D

Mad Tony
14-10-09, 21:06
Robin Hood and Dick Turpin had the right idea by robbing from the rich :DYou don't seriously believe that do you? :eek:

I don't know why Robin Hood is always portrayed as some kind of hero. He should be portrayed as a menace.

Hermina94
14-10-09, 21:08
As we all know, the USA and England are two countries separated by a common language. In fact, all English-speaking countries have their oddities. So what are they?

I wonder if the English actually still use the term, 'Bloody' the same way Americans say 'Crap'. 'Bloody' seems like a very old word. These kind of ‘just stubbed your toe’ words change over time.

So if an Englishman goes to New Zealand, will he understand all they say there?
Or an American in Ireland. Will she say, 'What the hell you just say?'
Or an Australian in inner city New York, finding he has a big language barrier?


Watch this...

3UgpfSp2t6k

the videos a bit scary....

patriots88888
14-10-09, 21:14
Sorry, but I say 'learned' and not learnt! :ohn:

What's with the 't' at the end of all themz words anyways? :p

Since none of the Brits could be bothered to answer and/or too busy arguing over social classes, I decided to look it up and discover the answer myself.

http://www.askoxford.com/asktheexperts/faq/aboutspelling/learnt

Still say it should be learned, spelled, etc...! :ohn:

Minimus
14-10-09, 21:17
I speak like accent #1.

And I say never say "bloody". It sounds so stereotypical of England. :)

jackles
14-10-09, 21:20
Here it sounds more like bladdy than bloody!

patriots88888
14-10-09, 21:22
That's right, I'm imposing my vocabular dictatorship upon the world! Say and spell it right, or suffer the consequences! :smk:

Azerutan
14-10-09, 21:42
Oh, England is a country... That's news to me :p hehehe

I got what you meant don't worry ;)

Mad Tony
14-10-09, 21:44
I speak like accent #1.

And I say never say "bloody". It sounds so stereotypical of England. :)Same here. :p

Agent 47
14-10-09, 21:55
You don't seriously believe that do you? :eek:

I don't know why Robin Hood is always portrayed as some kind of hero. He should be portrayed as a menace.

sure, why not, Robin Hood certainly didn't rob folks for his own wealth, plus i believe he might have been a fellow Yorkshireman so that gives him instant kudos :jmp: not sure about Dick Turpin though, i know he hung around York area but he's probably a southerner (just a guess) :vlol:

nah! i wouldn't call Robin a menace as his heart was in the right place, fighting for the common man/woman :D

Sheriff of Nottingham was a punk though :mad::D

Mad Tony
14-10-09, 22:00
Fighting for communism more like! :eek: :p

Agent 47
14-10-09, 22:05
Fighting for communism more like! :eek: :p

Robin Hood was no commie, did they actually exist back then? turns out Dick Turpin was a common thief and was not a good geezer, rumour has it he did ride from York to London in record time though :D

Cochrane
14-10-09, 22:10
Fighting for communism more like! :eek: :p

You may have noticed that, in the parlance of communists, Robin Hood never fought against the Bourgeoise and for the Working Classes. Neither did he, in terms of communism-haters, fight against private enterprises and successful individuals and for lazy people who had a chance at a better job but didn't use it.

Mad Tony
14-10-09, 22:17
You may have noticed that, in the parlance of communists, Robin Hood never fought against the Bourgeoise and for the Working Classes. Neither did he, in terms of communism-haters, fight against private enterprises and successful individuals and for lazy people who had a chance at a better job but didn't use it.Lol, don't have to get technical. But still, stealing from the rich and giving to the poor is a big no no. It's still stealing! :p

Dennis's Mom
14-10-09, 22:17
Dennis Moore FTW. :D

Agent 47
14-10-09, 22:23
Lol, don't have to get technical. But still, stealing from the rich and giving to the poor is a big no no. It's still stealing! :p

and i'll respectfully disagree with you :D back then, different era different mentality, he and people like him were indeed hailed as heroes. yeah theft is theft but it was for a good cause so no harm no foul IMO :jmp:

Solice
14-10-09, 23:08
I know for Lara, they intentionally used and English accent to denote nobility. Seems even London itself has different accents.

In the US, TV is dominated by a vanilla version of a midwestern accent. So people from the South and Northeast who want to be in the TV biz have to work on their accent.

I have spoken to my Indian co-workers about how they had to adjust to US English. They learn Oxford English in school, which has more than a few passing differences. It gives them fits when they come over here.


Here is a thick accent. I assume this is a country accent. I can understand some of it, but me being a Yank I get lost.:p

6a4yTO25mGE

Romantics Inc.
14-10-09, 23:12
That video is awesome! :eek:

Mad Tony
14-10-09, 23:13
^^

It's like listening to someone speak a different language. :p

Romantics Inc.
14-10-09, 23:14
That guy^

He is my HERO
My IDOL
MY LOVER <3



:p

Lemmie
15-10-09, 08:47
Here is a thick accent. I assume this is a country accent. I can understand some of it, but me being a Yank I get lost.:p



I've heard thicker Scottish accents. That one was pretty clear - sounds sort of Strathclyde/Lanarkshire/Ayrshire which would fit with what he was saying about his family history.

In terms of favoured accents in Scotland, Orcadian and Highland accents are pretty nice. None except really thick Glaswegian irritate me - and then it depends on the individual in question.

Johnnay
15-10-09, 09:13
Luckily we don't even say it in a posh way.....:D





bugger off Johnnay!!! :D

You Poms. we'll beat you in anything and thats fair dinkum to the brits too


anyways sheilas and bogans whats up Bloody oaths:D:D:D

Nenya awakens
15-10-09, 09:46
But bloody, bugger and oi are mainly aussie slang rather than British( or the same)

tbh how about Aussie English. It fits in.... right

Bloody and bugger are actually Brittish in origin so sod off :)





I usually say Bladdy 'Ell.

scoopy_loopy
15-10-09, 10:06
I don't say bloody, but I used to say bugger alot. But ... not so much anymore. Ive only just realised it... hm, I probably start saying it again now because of this :p

Changeling
15-10-09, 10:53
In terms of favoured accents in Scotland, Orcadian and Highland accents are pretty nice.

Those are my favourties too. The whole "Yee see yee ya pap? If yee dinnae dae whit a say then a'll sit on yur face" accent isn't the most glamorous...

Mytly
15-10-09, 21:49
Hmmm ... 21 accents, and yet Ms. Amy Walker didn't even think of trying an Indian English accent? The largest English speaking population in the world is in India!

And what about Chinese English? The Chinese are the fastest growing English learning population. Pretty soon, English will belong to those for whom it's a second language. ;)

xXhayleyroxXx
15-10-09, 21:53
hehe about the 'bloody' as a curse we do!
its 'bloody hell!' if you stub your toe :)

Legends
15-10-09, 22:21
Luckily we don't even say it in a posh way.....:D

I love English, but not stuck-up British. I like Keeley Hawes when she voice Lara. :D

Lemmie
15-10-09, 22:24
Those are my favourties too. The whole "Yee see yee ya pap? If yee dinnae dae whit a say then a'll sit on yur face" accent isn't the most glamorous...

No I suppose not. Then again, you wouldn't find thick Highlands at a society soiree too often.

Softly accented Scots is good. That's what I think I have, luckily. I can turn on the Weegie and the Edinburgh accents when required though. :D

Solice
15-10-09, 23:10
hehe about the 'bloody' as a curse we do!
its 'bloody hell!' if you stub your toe :)

Or get trapped in Thor's gauntlet room:D