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Lara Croft!
18-10-09, 18:06
My Christian name is Theodora, but everyone calls me Lora. Weird, huh? Anyway, let's share information about our names.

THEODORA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Greek, Ancient Greek

Other Scripts: Θεοδωρα (Greek)

Pronounced: thee-ə-DOR-ə (English) [key]
Feminine form of THEODORE. This name was common in the Byzantine Empire, being borne by several empresses including the influential wife of Justinian in the 6th century.


LORA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Italian

Pronounced: LAWR-a (English) [key]
Variant of LAURA. It is also used as an Italian diminutive of ELEONORA or LOREDANA.


Check yours http://www.behindthename.com/

LaraLuvrrr
18-10-09, 18:08
Well my name's Alex not Alexander but there's only deep info. on Alexander...

ALEXANDER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/eng.php), German (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/ger.php), Dutch (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/dut.php), Scandinavian (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/sca.php), Hungarian (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/hun.php), Slovak (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/cze.php), Biblical (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/bibl.php), Ancient Greek (Latinized) (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/gre-anci.php), Greek Mythology (Latinized) (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/gre-myth.php)
Pronounced: al-əg-ZAN-dər (English), ah-lek-SAHN-der (German), ah-luk-SAHN-dur (Dutch) [key] (http://www.behindthename.com/pronunciation.php)

Latinized form of the Greek name Αλεξανδρος (http://www.behindthename.com/support/transcribe.php?type=GR&target=Alexandros) (Alexandros), which meant "defending men" from Greek αλεξω (http://www.behindthename.com/support/transcribe.php?type=GR&target=alexw) (alexo) "to defend, help" and ανηρ (http://www.behindthename.com/support/transcribe.php?type=GR&target=anhr) (aner) "man" (genitive ανδρος (http://www.behindthename.com/support/transcribe.php?type=GR&target=andros)). In Greek mythology (http://www.behindthename.com/glossary/view/mythology) this was another name of the hero Paris (http://www.behindthename.com/name/paris-1), and it also belongs to several characters in the New Testament (http://www.behindthename.com/glossary/view/new_testament). However, the most famous bearer was Alexander the Great, King of Macedon. In the 4th century BC he built a huge empire out of Greece, Egypt, Persia, and parts of India. Due to his fame, and later medieval tales involving him, use of his name spread throughout Europe.The name has been used by kings of Scotland, Poland and Yugoslavia, emperors of Russia, and eight popes. Other notable bearers include English poet Alexander Pope (1688-1744), American statesman Alexander Hamilton (1755-1804), Scottish-Canadian explorer Sir Alexander MacKenzie (1764-1820), Russian poet Alexander Pushkin (1799-1837), and Alexander Graham Bell (1847-1922), the Scottish-Canadian-American inventor of the telephone.

Lavinder
18-10-09, 18:11
LAURA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/eng.php), Spanish (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/spa.php), Italian (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/ita.php), Portuguese (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/por.php), Romanian (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/rmn.php), Finnish (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/fin.php), Estonian (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/est.php), Hungarian (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/hun.php), Polish (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/pol.php), Slovene (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/sln.php), Scandinavian (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/sca.php), German (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/ger.php), Dutch (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/dut.php), Late Roman (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/rom-late.php)
Pronounced: LAWR-ə (English), LOW-rah (Spanish, Italian, Polish, German, Dutch) [key] (http://www.behindthename.com/pronunciation.php)

Feminine form of the Late Latin name Laurus, which meant "laurel". This meaning was favourable, since in ancient Rome the leaves of laurel trees were used to create victors' garlands. The name was borne by the 9th-century Spanish martyr Saint (http://www.behindthename.com/glossary/view/saint) Laura, who was a nun thrown into a vat of molten lead by the Moors. It was also the name of the subject of poems by the 14th-century Italian poet Petrarch.As an English name, Laura has been used since the 13th century. A famous bearer was Laura Secord (1775-1868), a Canadian heroine during the War of 1812:)

Surohicko
18-10-09, 18:11
Mine's just Lewis so yea..

LEWIS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LOO-is [key]
Medieval English form of LOUIS. A famous bearer was Lewis Carroll (1832-1989), the author of 'Alice's Adventures in Wonderland'. This was also the surname of C. S. Lewis (1898-1963), the author of the 'Chronicles of Narnia'.

LaraRules81
18-10-09, 18:11
RYAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, English

Pronounced: RIE-ən [key]

From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Riain meaning "descendent of Rían". The given name Rían probably means "little king" (from Irish rí "king" combined with a diminutive suffix).

:D

DaNoNeMoKiId
18-10-09, 18:13
ROBVIC was not found in this database.
*shrugs*

NemesisX13X
18-10-09, 18:13
I didn't find any of my names. Boo. :p

Surohicko
18-10-09, 18:14
Boo?? is that your name?

NemesisX13X
18-10-09, 18:15
No! :vlol:

patriots88888
18-10-09, 18:16
TODD
Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: TAHD [key]

From a surname meaning "fox", derived from Middle English todde.

That's me, plain and simple! :p

Surohicko
18-10-09, 18:16
Why put BOO :p

Dina_Croft
18-10-09, 18:16
It doesn't have mine...:(

Buaaah!It has the male name Kwnstantinos -_-

NemesisX13X
18-10-09, 18:17
Forget it! You're spamming the thread! :smk:

Funny, all weirdo arabic names were listed, and mine wasn't? :confused:

Surohicko
18-10-09, 18:17
Can't everyone who hasn't got their name in the database put there names here :D

adventurerLara
18-10-09, 18:19
HELEN
Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Greek Mythology (Anglicized)

Pronounced: HEL-ən (English) [key]

English form of the Greek ‘Ελενη (Helene), probably from Greek ‘ελενη (helene) "torch" or "corposant", or possibly related to σεληνη (selene) "moon". In Greek mythology Helen was the daughter of Zeus and Leda, whose kidnapping by Paris was the cause of the Trojan War. The name was also borne by the 4th-century Saint Helena, mother of the Roman emperor Constantine, who supposedly found the True Cross during a trip to Jerusalem.
The name was originally used among early Christians in honour of the saint, as opposed to the classical character. In England it was commonly spelled Ellen during the Middle Ages, and the spelling Helen was not regularly used until after the Renaissance. A famous bearer was Helen Keller (1880-1968), an American author and lecturer who was both blind and deaf.


:)

oocladableeblah
18-10-09, 18:20
ANDREW
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical
Pronounced: AN-droo (English) [key]
From the Greek name Ανδρεας (Andreas), which was derived from ανηρ (aner) "man" (genitive ανδρος (andros) "of a man"). In the New Testament the apostle Andrew, the first disciple to join Jesus, was the brother of Simon Peter. According to tradition, he later preached in the Black Sea region, with some legends saying he was crucified on an X-shaped cross. Andrew, being a Greek name, was probably only a nickname or a translation of his real Hebrew name, which is not known.
This name has been common (in various spellings) throughout the Christian world, and it became very popular in the Middle Ages. Saint Andrew is regarded as the patron of Scotland, Russia, Greece and Romania. The name has been borne by three kings of Hungary, American president Andrew Jackson (1767-1845), and, more recently, English composer Andrew Lloyd Webber (1948-).
Didn't know it was from Greece.

CerebralAssassin
18-10-09, 18:20
JACOB

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Dutch, Scandinavian, Biblical

Pronounced: JAY-kəb (English), YAH-kawp (Dutch) [key]
From the Latin Iacobus, which was from the Greek Ιακωβος (Iakobos), which was from the Hebrew name יַעֲקֹב (Ya'aqov). In the Old Testament, Jacob (later called Israel) was the son of Isaac and Rebecca and the father of the twelve founders of the twelve tribes of Israel. He was born holding his twin brother Esau's heel, and his name is explained as meaning "holder of the heel" or "supplanter". Other theories claim that it is in fact derived from a hypothetical name like יַעֲקֹבְאֵל (Ya'aqov'el) meaning "may God protect".

The English names Jacob and James derive from the same source, with James coming from Latin Iacomus, a later variant of Iacobus. Unlike English, many languages do not have separate spellings for the two names.

In England, Jacob was mainly regarded as a Jewish name during the Middle Ages, though the variant James was used among Christians. Jacob came into general use as a Christian name after the Protestant Reformation. A famous bearer was Jacob Grimm (1785-1863), the German linguist and writer who was, with his brother Wilhelm, the author of 'Grimm's Fairy Tales'.

:p

Phys
18-10-09, 18:21
ROBERT

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French, Scandinavian, German, Dutch, Czech, Polish, Russian, Slovene, Romanian, Ancient Germanic

Other Scripts: Роберт (Russian)

Pronounced: RAH-bərt (English), ro-BER (French), RO-bert (German), RAW-bert (Polish), RO-byert (Russian), RO-beert (Russian) [key]

From the Germanic name Hrodebert meaning "bright fame", derived from the Germanic elements hrod "fame" and beraht "bright". The Normans introduced this name to Britain, where it replaced the Old English cognate Hreodbeorht. It has been a very common English name since that time.
The name has been borne by two early kings of France, two Dukes of Normandy, and three kings of Scotland, including Robert the Bruce who restored the independence of Scotland from England in the 14th century. The author Robert Browning (1812-1889) and poets Robert Burns (1759-1796) and Robert Frost (1874-1963) are famous literary bearers of this name. Other bearers include Robert E. Lee (1807-1870), the commander of the Confederate army during the American Civil War, and American actor Robert Redford (1936-).

Hmm.

NemesisxAngelus
18-10-09, 18:26
It doesn't seem to know my name which is Mylène. I have heard many variatons on the name, saying it's a combination of Maria Helena what would mean: "bitter torch" although I was told once it means: "bringer of love" :)

James_Rutland
18-10-09, 18:29
MASON
Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: MAY-sən [key]

From an English surname meaning "stoneworker", from an Old French word of Germanic origin (akin to Old English macian "to make").

I'm surprised my name is on there. :D

Catracoth
18-10-09, 18:31
MASON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAY-sən
From an English surname meaning "stoneworker", from an Old French word of Germanic origin (akin to Old English macian "to make").

Not really all that interesting.

Kelly Craftman
18-10-09, 18:34
KELLY
Gender: Masculine & Feminine

Usage: Irish, English

Pronounced: KEL-ee [key]

From the Irish given name CEALLACH or the surname derived from it Ó Ceallaigh. As a surname, it has been borne by actor and dancer Gene Kelly (1912-1996) and actress and princess Grace Kelly (1929-1982).


KEL-ee :vlol:

Lara Croft!
18-10-09, 18:37
If you can't find your name in the site, then you can google it or search in wikipedia.


Can't everyone who hasn't got their name in the database put there names here :D


Yes, you can submit a new name here http://www.behindthename.com/submit/submit.php

James_Rutland
18-10-09, 18:38
MASON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAY-sən
From an English surname meaning "stoneworker", from an Old French word of Germanic origin (akin to Old English macian "to make").

Not really all that interesting.

High five. :p

jamieoliver22
18-10-09, 18:41
JAMIE
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Scottish (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/sco.php), English (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/eng.php)
Pronounced: JAY-mee [key] (http://www.behindthename.com/pronunciation.php)

Originally a Lowland Scots diminutive (http://www.behindthename.com/glossary/view/diminutive) of JAMES (http://www.behindthename.com/name/james). Since the late 19th century it has also been used as a feminine form


Great...

Kelly Craftman
18-10-09, 18:44
Great...

feminine? :eek: never met a female Jamie before

CroftGameGirl
18-10-09, 18:48
Well, I'm not bothered to look it up :p
My name's Hana No extra n's or h's (but i dnt mind when people add them though :p) and in Albanian, it means moon and Japanese, it means flower :D

takamotosan
18-10-09, 18:53
James


gender: Masculine

usage: English, biblical

pronounced: Jaymz (english) [key]

english form of the late latin name iacomus which was derived from Ιακωβος (iakobos), the new testament greek form of the hebrew name ya'aqov (see jacob). This was the name of two apostles in the new testament. The first was saint james the greater, the apostle john's brother, who was beheaded under herod agrippa in the book of acts. The second was james the lesser, son of alphaeus. Another james (known as james the just) is also mentioned in the bible as being the brother of jesus.
Since the 13th century this form of the name has been used in england, though it became more common in scotland, where it was borne by several kings. In the 17th century the scottish king james vi inherited the english throne, becoming the first ruler of all britain, and the name grew much more popular. Famous bearers include the explorer captain james cook (1728-1779), the inventor of the steam engine james watt (1736-1819), and the novelist and poet james joyce (1882-1941). This name has also been borne by six american presidents. A notable fictional bearer is the british spy james bond, created by author ian fleming.

Squibbly
18-10-09, 18:56
ASHLEY

Gender: Feminine & Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: ASH-lee [key]
From an English surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "ash tree clearing" in Old English. Until the 1960s it was more commonly given to boys in the United States, but it is now most often used on girls.

Yeehaw, I'm an ash tree.

Your_Envy*
18-10-09, 19:11
ANA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, Slovene, Bulgarian, Romanian, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Georgian

Other Scripts: Ана (Bulgarian, Serbian, Macedonian)

Pronounced: AH-nah (Spanish)

It comes from Anna, so I will post the meaning of Anna over here too:

Form of Channah (see HANNAH) used in the Greek and Latin Old Testament. Many later Old Testament translations, including the English, use the Hannah spelling. The name appears briefly in the New Testament belonging to a prophetess who recognized Jesus as the Messiah. It was a popular name in the Byzantine Empire from an early date, and in the Middle Ages it became common among Western Christians due to veneration of Saint Anna (usually known as Saint Anne in English), the name traditionally assigned to the mother of the Virgin Mary. In the English-speaking world, this form came into general use in the 18th century, joining Ann and Anne.

The name was borne by several Russian royals, including an 18th-century empress of Russia. It was also the name of the main character in Leo Tolstoy's novel 'Anna Karenina' (1877), a woman forced to choose between her son and her lover.

:D

jamieoliver22
18-10-09, 19:11
feminine? :eek: never met a female Jamie before

Yeah, the name Jamie is used for both genders (slight spelling changes though I believe).

tombraiderluka
18-10-09, 19:14
Yeah, the name Jamie is used for both genders (slight spelling changes though I believe).
Jay me :mis:

Larson_1988
18-10-09, 19:14
MADS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Danish
Danish short form of MATTHIAS

Lol, good to know.

WCookie
18-10-09, 19:15
ABEL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French, Spanish, Portuguese, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek

Other Scripts: הֶבֶל, הָבֶל (Ancient Hebrew), Αβελ (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: AY-bəl (English), ah-BEL (Spanish), ə-BEL (Portuguese) [key]
From the Hebrew name הֶבֶל (Hevel) or הָבֶל (Havel) which meant "breath". In the Old Testament he was the second son of Adam and Eve, murdered out of envy by his brother Cain. In England, this name came into use during the Middle Ages, and it was common during the Puritan era.

Your_Envy*
18-10-09, 19:17
It doesn't seem to know my name which is Mylène. I have heard many variatons on the name, saying it's a combination of Maria Helena what would mean: "bitter torch" although I was told once it means: "bringer of love" :)

I really like your name. :cln:

I also found this on some other page:

The meaning of the name Ana is Gracious, Merciful

The origin of the name Ana is Spanish

D'awww. :D

ThatNorskChick
18-10-09, 19:17
AMANDA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, Scandinavian, Dutch, German, Finnish, Late Roman

Pronounced: ə-MAN-də (English), ah-MAHN-dah (Spanish, Italian) [key]
In part this is a feminine form of AMANDUS. However, it was not used during the Middle Ages, until in the 17th century it was recreated by authors and poets who based it directly on Latin amanda "lovable, worthy of love". Notably, it was used by the playwright Colley Cibber for a character in his play 'Love's Last Shift' (1696). It came into regular use during the 19th century.

Aww, love.

Melonie Tomb Raider
18-10-09, 19:17
My name means black/ dark/ mysterious. :D

Greenkey2
18-10-09, 19:19
JENNIFER
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/eng.php)
Pronounced: JEN-i-fər [key] (http://www.behindthename.com/pronunciation.php)

From a Cornish form of the Welsh name Gwenhwyfar (see GUINEVERE (http://www.behindthename.com/name/guinevere)). This name has only been common outside of Cornwall since the beginning of the 20th century, after it was featured in George Bernard Shaw's play 'The Doctor's Dilemma' (1906).


Probably explains why I have a fondness for Arthurian mytholgy :pi: Offhand, I also know that Gwenhwyfar's meaning stems from 'white wave' or 'white vision'... very apt considering I was born during blizzard conditions :D


Oh, and Surohicko? Go easy on that spam - it does horrible things to your arteries ;)

ultima espio
18-10-09, 19:23
RICHARD

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French, German, Czech, Dutch, Ancient Germanic

Pronounced: RICH-ərd (English), ree-SHAR (French), RIKH-ahrt (German) [key]
Means "brave power", derived from the Germanic elements ric "power, rule" and hard "brave, hardy". The Normans introduced this name to Britain, and it has been very common there since that time. It was borne by three kings of England including Richard I the Lionheart, leader of the Third Crusade in the 12th century. Famous bearers include two German opera composers, Richard Wagner (1813-1883) and Richard Strauss (1864-1949), as well as British explorer Sir Richard Burton (1821-1890) and American musician Little Richard (1920-).

Brave power eh:p

MattTR
18-10-09, 19:25
MATTHEW

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Biblical

Pronounced: MATH-yoo (English) [key]
English form of Ματθαιος (Matthaios), which was a Greek form of the Hebrew name מַתִּתְיָהוּ (Mattityahu) meaning "gift of YAHWEH". Saint Matthew, also called Levi, was one of the twelve apostles. He was a tax collector, and supposedly the author of the first Gospel in the New Testament. As an English name, Matthew has been in use since the Middle Ages.


Wow.. I feel special now.. :vlol: I knew Saint Matthew was a tax collector, I actually did a paper on him when I was in middle school.. :D

January_Snow*
18-10-09, 19:25
NIKOLA
Gender: Masculine

Usage: Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Hungarian, Czech, Slovak, Basque, Old Slavic

Other Scripts: Никола (Serbian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Church Slavic)

Pronounced: nee-ko-LA

Cognate of NICHOLAS - From the Greek name Νικολαος (Nikolaos) which meant "victory of the people" from Greek νικη (nike) "victory" and λαος (laos) "people". Saint Nicholas was a 4th-century bishop from Anatolia who, according to legend, saved the daughters of a poor man from lives of prostitution. He is the patron saint of children, sailors and merchants, as well as Greece and Russia. He formed the basis for the figure known as Santa Claus (created in the 19th century from Dutch Sinterklaas), the bringer of Christmas presents.
Due to the renown of the saint, this name has been widely used in the Christian world. It has been common in England since the 12th century, though it became a bit less popular after the Protestant Reformation. The name has been borne by five popes and two czars of Russia.

xXhayleyroxXx
18-10-09, 19:40
/

Dina_Croft
18-10-09, 19:43
usage: Serbian, croatian, slovene, bulgarian, macedonian, hungarian, czech, slovak, basque, old slavic


What THE DUCE????

irjudd
18-10-09, 19:47
JUDD

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: JUD [key]
From a surname which was derived from a diminutive of the given name JORDAN.

Which is interesting since my actual given name is not even close to "Jordan".

larasbestm8
18-10-09, 19:49
First name:
EMMA Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/eng.php), French (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/fre.php), Italian (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/ita.php), Finnish (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/fin.php), Dutch (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/dut.php), German (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/ger.php), Ancient Germanic (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/ger-anci.php)
Pronounced: EM-ə (English) [key] (http://www.behindthename.com/pronunciation.php)

Originally a short form of Germanic (http://www.behindthename.com/glossary/view/germanic_languages) names that began with the element (http://www.behindthename.com/glossary/view/name_element) ermen meaning "whole" or "universal". It was introduced to England by Emma of Normandy, who was the wife both of king Ethelred II (and by him the mother of Edward the Confessor) and later of king Canute. It was also borne by an 11th-century Austrian saint (http://www.behindthename.com/glossary/view/saint), who is sometimes called Hemma.After the Norman conquest (http://www.behindthename.com/glossary/view/normans) this name became common in England. It was revived in the 18th century, perhaps in part due to Matthew Prior's poem 'Henry and Emma' (1709). It was also used by Jane Austen for the central character, the matchmaker Emma Woodhouse, in her novel 'Emma' (1816).


Middle name:

ROSE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/eng.php), French (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/fre.php)
Pronounced: ROZ [key] (http://www.behindthename.com/pronunciation.php)

Originally a Norman form of a Germanic (http://www.behindthename.com/glossary/view/germanic_languages) name, which was composed of the elements (http://www.behindthename.com/glossary/view/name_element) hrod "fame" and heid "kind, sort, type". It was introduced to England by the Normans (http://www.behindthename.com/glossary/view/normans) in the forms Roese or Rohese. From an early date it was associated with the word for the fragrant flower rose (derived from Latin rosa). When the name was revived in the 19th century, it was probably with the flower in mind.


Hmm...I suppose I have a mainly Germanic name then...

Marianna12
18-10-09, 19:55
MARIANNA
Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, English, Hungarian, Russian, Slovak, Polish, Greek

Other Scripts: Марианна (Russian), Μαριαννα (Greek)

Pronounced: mer-ee-AN-ə (English), mar-ee-AN-ə (English), mah-ree-AH-nah (Russian), mahr-YAHN-nah (Polish) [key]

Combination of MARIA and ANNA. It has been confused with the Roman name MARIANA to the point that it is no longer easy to separate the two forms. It is sometimes also used as a Latinized form of MARIAMNE.

Great thread Lora!:tmb:

Dingaling
18-10-09, 20:07
JOSHUA

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Biblical

Pronounced: JAH-shə-wə (English), JAW-shwə (English) [key]
From the Hebrew name יְהוֹשֻׁעַ (Yehoshu'a) meaning "YAHWEH is salvation". Joshua was one of the twelve spies sent into Canaan by Moses in the Old Testament. After Moses died Joshua succeeded him as leader of the Israelites. As an English name, Joshua has been in use since the Protestant Reformation.

The name Jesus comes from a Greek translation of the Aramaic short form יֵשׁוּעַ (Yeshu'a), which was the real name of Jesus.

Wooo, Jesus!

Beans-Bot
18-10-09, 20:09
ZACHARY

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: ZAK-ə-ree [key]
Usual English form of ZACHARIAS. This form has been in use since the Middle Ages, though it did not become common until after the Protestant Reformation. It was borne by American military commander and president Zachary Taylor (1784-1850).


SETH (1)

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical, English

Other Scripts: שֵׁת (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: SETH (English) [key]
Means "placed" or "appointed" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament he was the third named son of Adam and Eve. In England this name came into use after the Protestant Reformation.



SETH (2)

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Egyptian Mythology (Hellenized)

Pronounced: SET (English), SAYT (English) [key]
From Σεθως (Sethos), the Greek form of Egyptian Sutekh or Set, which possibly meant "pillar" or "dazzle". Seth was the evil Egyptian god of chaos and the desert, the slayer of Osiris. Orisis' son Horus eventually defeats Set and has him banished to the desert.

---

Very Biblical it seems, Protestant to be exact. That would make sense, seeing as I was raised Protestant. :ton:

EmeraldFields
18-10-09, 20:14
NICHOLAS

Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: NIK-ə-ləs (English), nee-ko-LA (French) [key]

From the Greek name Νικολαος (Nikolaos) which meant "victory of the people" from Greek νικη (nike) "victory" and λαος (laos) "people". Saint Nicholas was a 4th-century bishop from Anatolia who, according to legend, saved the daughters of a poor man from lives of prostitution. He is the patron saint of children, sailors and merchants, as well as Greece and Russia. He formed the basis for the figure known as Santa Claus (created in the 19th century from Dutch Sinterklaas), the bringer of Christmas presents.

Due to the renown of the saint, this name has been widely used in the Christian world. It has been common in England since the 12th century, though it became a bit less popular after the Protestant Reformation. The name has been borne by five popes and two czars of Russia.

Croft, Lara
18-10-09, 20:41
What's behind my name?





My surname.




:ton:

Reggie
18-10-09, 20:45
THOMAS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/eng.php), French (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/fre.php), German (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/ger.php), Dutch (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/dut.php), Scandinavian (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/sca.php), Greek (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/gre.php), Biblical (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/bibl.php), Biblical Latin (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/rom-bibl.php), Biblical Greek (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/gre-bibl.php)
Other Scripts: Θωμας (http://www.behindthename.com/support/transcribe.php?type=MG,GR&target=T%5Ewmas) (Greek)
Pronounced: TAHM-əs (English), TOM-əs (English), to-MA (French), TO-mahs (German, Dutch), tho-MAHS (Greek) [key] (http://www.behindthename.com/pronunciation.php)

Greek form of the Aramaic name תָּאוֹמָא (http://www.behindthename.com/support/transcribe.php?type=HB&target=T.a%27woma%27) (Ta'oma') which meant "twin". In the New Testament (http://www.behindthename.com/glossary/view/new_testament) this was the name of the apostle who initially doubted the resurrected Jesus. According to tradition he was martyred in India. Due to his renown, the name came into general use in the Christian world.In England the name was introduced by the Normans (http://www.behindthename.com/glossary/view/normans) and became very popular due to Saint (http://www.behindthename.com/glossary/view/saint) Thomas Becket, a 12th-century archbishop of Canterbury and martyr. Another notable saint by this name was the 13th-century Italian philosopher and theologian Thomas Aquinas, who is regarded as a Doctor of the Church. Other famous bearers include philosopher Thomas Hobbes (1588-1679), American president Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826), novelist Thomas Hardy (1840-1928), and inventor Thomas Edison (1847-1931).

I'm not surprised there's quite a lot on mine. Thomas is quite a common name after all. :)

CroftGameGirl
18-10-09, 20:48
What's behind my name?





My surname.




:ton:

Ha-di-haha :ton:

Tina Croft
18-10-09, 20:48
What's behind my name?





My surname.




:ton:


lol :D


CHRISTINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Scandinavian, Dutch
Pronounced: kris-TEEN-ə (English), kris-TEE-nah (German, Dutch) [key]
From Christiana, the Latin feminine form of CHRISTIAN. This was the name of an early, possibly legendary, saint who was tormented by her pagan father. It was also borne by a 17th-century Swedish queen and patron the arts who gave up her crown in order to become a Roman Catholic.

uhm that's interesting

Nerd For Life
18-10-09, 20:55
RAQUEL

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, English

Pronounced: rah-KEL (Spanish) [key]
Spanish and Portuguese form of RACHEL

Rai
18-10-09, 20:56
RACHEL

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Hebrew, French, German, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek, Biblical Hebrew

Other Scripts: רָחֵל (Hebrew), Ραχηλ (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: RAY-chəl (English), ra-SHEL (French) [key]
Means "ewe" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this was the name of the favourite wife of Jacob and the mother of Joseph and Benjamin. The name was common among Jews in the Middle Ages, but it was not generally used as a Christian name in the English-speaking world until after the Protestant Reformation.

I really dislike the meaning of my name. I much prefer the Spanish version Nerd For Life, it's sweet. :D

My middle name doesn't have a meaning from that site but it means 'to Protect' apparently.


JACQUELINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French, English

Pronounced: zha-kə-LEEN (French), zhak-LEEN (French), JAK-ə-leen (English), JAK-ə-lin (English) [key]
French feminine form of JACQUES, also commonly used in the English-speaking world.

January_Snow*
18-10-09, 20:58
What THE DUCE????

sorry what?

Nenya awakens
18-10-09, 21:00
My first name is Marc and.....

MARC
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French, Catalan, Welsh
Pronounced: MARK (French) [key]
French, Catalan and Welsh form of MARK

mind
18-10-09, 21:02
JAROSLAV
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Czech (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/cze.php), Slovak (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/cze.php)

Czech and Slovak form of JAROSŁAW (http://www.behindthename.com/name/jarosl16aw)
->
JAROSŁAW
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Polish (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/pol.php)
Pronounced: yah-RAW-swahf [key] (http://www.behindthename.com/pronunciation.php)

Means "fierce and glorious", derived from the Slavic (http://www.behindthename.com/glossary/view/slavic_languages) elements (http://www.behindthename.com/glossary/view/name_element) jary "fierce, strong" and slawa "glory".

larson n natla
18-10-09, 21:03
JAMIE
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Scottish, English
Pronounced: JAY-mee [key]
Originally a Lowland Scots diminutive of JAMES. Since the late 19th century it has also been used as a feminine form

Wow lot of history there :rolleyes: its actually originated from ireland, not scotland so yeah :ohn:

Vanity
18-10-09, 21:13
ERIC

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French, Swedish

Pronounced: ER-ik (English), er-EEK (French) [key]
From the Old Norse name Eiríkr, derived from the elements ei "ever" and ríkr "ruler". A notable bearer was Eiríkr inn Rauda (Eric the Red in English), a 10th-century navigator and explorer who discovered Greenland. This was also the name of several early kings of Sweden, Denmark and Norway.

This common Norse name was first brought to England by Danish settlers during the Anglo-Saxon period. It was not popular in England in the Middle Ages, but it was revived in the 19th-century, in part due to the children's novel 'Eric, or Little by Little' (1858) by Frederic William Farrar.
... Well, I learn something new every day. That meaning is news to me. :D

Assassin13
18-10-09, 21:13
NIKKI

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: NIK-ee [key]
Diminutive of NICOLE

:p

i'm actually a boy lol

maniakatosheto
18-10-09, 21:22
TODOR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Bulgarian, Serbian
Other Scripts: Тодор (Bulgarian, Serbian)
Bulgarian and Serbian form of THEODORE
Hmm interesting XD

Alex Shepherd
18-10-09, 21:33
Khalid is a popular Arabic name, meaning "eternal" or "immortal".

Raider Man

Love2Raid
18-10-09, 21:44
Here goes:

SANDRA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, English, Portuguese, German, Dutch, Scandinavian, Finnish, Latvian, Lithuanian, Slovene

Pronounced: SAHN-drah (Italian, Dutch), SAN-drə (English), ZAHN-drah (German) [key]
Short form of ALESSANDRA. It was introduced to the English-speaking world by author George Meredith, who used it for the heroine in his novel 'Emilia in England' (1864) and the reissued version 'Sandra Belloni' (1887).

Mmmmkay...

ALESSANDRA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian

Pronounced: ahl-e-SAHN-drah [key]
Italian form of ALEXANDRA

Uh huh...

ALEXANDRA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German, Scandinavian, Dutch, French, English, Greek, Portuguese, Romanian, Czech, Hungarian, Slovak, Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology

Other Scripts: Αλεξανδρα (Greek)

Pronounced: ah-lek-SAHN-drah (German), ah-luk-SAHN-drah (Dutch), al-əg-ZAN-drə (English) [key]
Feminine form of ALEXANDER. In Greek mythology this was a Mycenaean epithet of the goddess Hera, and an alternate name of Cassandra. It was borne by several early Christian saints, and also by the wife of Nicholas II, the last czar of Russia. She was from Germany and had the birth name Alix, but was renamed Alexandra upon joining the Russian Church.

Aha! Cool. :)

Edit: Apparently it means something like 'protector of mankind'. :D

Great thread. :D

Cloe Christina
18-10-09, 21:54
my name does not exist ....... :(

Love2Raid
18-10-09, 21:59
my name does not exist ....... :(

Is Cloe your real name?

CHLOE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek, Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology

Other Scripts: Χλοη (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: KLO-ee (English) [key]
Means "green shoot" in Greek. This was an epithet of the Greek goddess Demeter. The name is also mentioned by Paul in one of his epistles in the New Testament. As an English name, Chloe has been in use since the Protestant Reformation.

Cloe Christina
18-10-09, 22:05
Is Cloe your real name?

yeah it is .... but i'm like the only person who doesn't spell it with a h ....:o
i always thought it meant goddess of unripened grain - but i don't remember where i heard it ??

Chocola teapot
18-10-09, 22:28
TEA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Scandinavian, Finnish, Slovene
Short form of DOROTHEA or THEODORA

NemesisxAngelus
18-10-09, 22:36
feminine? :eek: never met a female Jamie before
I have, however she wrote her name often as "Jaime" to have people not asking: "are you really a girl?"

I really like your name. :cln:

I also found this on some other page:



D'awww. :D

Haha thanks! It's pronounced (if you pronounce it in English) as Me-lah-ne since it's often mispronounced in English speaking countries.

Nannonxyay
18-10-09, 22:43
SHANNON

Gender: Feminine & Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: SHAN-ən [key]
From the name of the Shannon River, the longest river in Ireland. It is composed of the Gaelic elements sean "old, wise" and abhann "river". As a given name, it first became common in America after the 1940s.

Well, aren't I just interesting?

Hermina94
18-10-09, 22:45
They don't have mine either :(
But I think it means "warrior" :D

mudkip25
18-10-09, 22:48
THEODORE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: THEE-ə-dor [key]
From the Greek name Θεοδωρος (Theodoros), which meant "gift of god" from Greek θεος (theos) "god" and δωρον (doron) "gift". This was the name of several saints, including Theodore of Amasea, a 4th-century Greek soldier; Theodore of Tarsus, a 7th-century archbishop of Canterbury; and Theodore the Studite, a 9th-century Byzantine monk. It was also borne by two popes.

This was a common name in classical Greece, and, due to both the saints who carried it and the favourable meaning, it came into general use in the Christian world, being especially popular among Eastern Christians. It was however rare in Britain before the 19th century. Famous bearers include three tsars of Russia (in the Russian form Fyodor), American president Theodore Roosevelt (1858-1919) and American children's book creator Theodore Seuss Geisel (1904-1991), better known as Dr. Seuss.

here's mine!

Quasimodo
18-10-09, 22:49
I am a meaningful shrubbery.
HEATHER

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: HE-dhər [key]
From the English word heather for the variety of small shrubs with pink or white flowers which commonly grow in rocky areas. It is derived from Middle English hather. It was first used as a given name in the late 19th century, though it did not become popular until the last half of the 20th century.

Encore
18-10-09, 22:50
*******s redirect my name Marta to "Martha". :rolleyes:

MARTHA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Scandinavian, Greek, Biblical, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek

Other Scripts: Μαρθα (Greek), Марѳа (Church Slavic)

Pronounced: MAHR-thə (English) [key]
From Aramaic מרתא (marta') meaning "lady, mistress". In the New Testament this was the name of the sister of Lazarus and Mary of Bethany. It was not used in England until after the Protestant Reformation. A notable bearer was Martha Washington (1731-1802), the wife of the first American president George Washington.

Sucks having a biblical name, but at least mine means lady. :cool:

Squibbly
18-10-09, 22:53
I am a meaningful shrubbery.

I'm a tree. Flora party! *high five*

..I edited my post because I said something that sounded wrong even though it's not what I meant. :p

Rai
18-10-09, 22:57
I've always liked the names Cloe (with or without the h) and Heather :hug:

jjbennett
18-10-09, 23:11
My name means "supplanter" - try and guess my name! :)

miss.haggard
18-10-09, 23:12
Elaney, supposed to be Elayne... Got messed up, everyone calls me Laney.

irjudd
18-10-09, 23:36
TEA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Scandinavian, Finnish, Slovene
Short form of DOROTHEA or THEODORA

I love your drinks. :hug:

Squibbly
18-10-09, 23:38
^ :vlol:

amiro1989
18-10-09, 23:40
AMIR (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: أمير (Arabic)
Means "commander" or "prince" in Arabic. This was originally a title, which has come into English as the Arabic loanword emir.

AMIR (2)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: אָמִיר (Hebrew)
Pronounced: ah-MEER [key]
Means "treetop" in Hebrew.

Well, that's me. :)

Catapharact
19-10-09, 00:01
AMIR

Its also Aramaic and Hebrew for "The preserver of life."

My name is Umair. I am your opposite ;). Its exact meaning is "The taker of life" or "The bringer of doom."

Oh yeah... Death becomes me.

Ada the Mental
19-10-09, 00:08
My real name is Alexandra, which has already been posted a few times, and everyone calls me Ada, anyway, so...

ADA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Polish, Hungarian
Pronounced: AY-də (English), AH-dah (Polish) [key]
Short form of ADELAIDE and other names beginning with the same sound. This name was borne by Augusta Ada King (1815-1852), the Countess of Lovelace (known as Ada Lovelace), a daughter of Lord Byron. She was an assistant to Charles Babbage, the inventor of an early mechanical computer.
I use the second pronunciation, by the way.

NemesisxAngelus
19-10-09, 00:13
I love your drinks. :hug:

I was already wondering what flavor she was. :pi:

G_iz4GIR
19-10-09, 00:24
Gir is the best character from one of the best cartoon shows...
Invader Zim.

He is an alien robot that dresses up like a green dog, while he's undercover. He can be a retard and says really funny things, like my signature.

Encore
19-10-09, 00:28
My real name is Alexandra, which has already been posted a few times, and everyone calls me Ada, anyway, so...


I use the second pronunciation, by the way.

I think Ada means father in the elvish language shown in Lord of the Rings. :D [/nerd]

irjudd
19-10-09, 00:29
...elvish language ... Lord of the Rings. :D [/nerd]

:hug:

Encore
19-10-09, 00:31
* special super secret nerd high five *

Ikas90
19-10-09, 00:34
SAKI
Gender: Feminine

Usage: Japanese

Other Scripts: (Japanese)

From Japanese (sa) "blossom" and (ki) "hope".

-_- Wow, just wow. xD

Ok, allow me to correct:

ATHANASIOS
Gender: Masculine

Usage: Greek, Ancient Greek

Other Scripts: Αθανασιος (Greek)

Original Greek form of ATHANASIUS

Yes, my name 'Saki' originates from 'Athanasios'. :vlol:

Ada the Mental
19-10-09, 00:35
Which means "immortal". ^

LotR Nerds rule the universe!
...I really want to learn Elvish.

Encore
19-10-09, 00:42
Which means "immortal". ^

LotR Nerds rule the universe!
...I really want to learn Elvish.

There's actually two diferent elvish languages, one I think was inspired by gaelic and is more rough (it's spoken only by Galadriel in the movie I think), but the other (spoken by Arwen etc.) is absolutely beautiful. Reminds me a lot of icelandic. Every time I listen to Sigur Rós it's like they're speaking it. :cln:

Hybrid Soldier
19-10-09, 00:47
ADAM

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French, German, Dutch, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Russian, Ukrainian, Romanian, Hebrew, Arabic, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek, Biblical Hebrew

Other Scripts: Адам (Russian, Ukrainian), אָדָם (Hebrew), آدم (Arabic), Αδαμ (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: A-dəm (English), AH-dahm (German, Dutch, Polish), ah-DAHM (Russian) [key]
This is the Hebrew word for "man". It could be ultimately derived from Hebrew אדם ('adam) meaning "to be red", referring to the ruddy colour of human skin, or from Akkadian adamu meaning "to make". According to Genesis in the Old Testament Adam was created from the earth by God (there is a word play on Hebrew אֲדָמָה ('adamah) "earth"). He and Eve were supposedly the first humans, living happily in the Garden of Eden until Adam ate a forbidden fruit given to him by Eve.

As an English Christian name, Adam has been common since the Middle Ages, and it received a boost after the Protestant Reformation. A famous bearer was Scottish economist Adam Smith (1723-1790).

Lolololol.

amiro1989
19-10-09, 00:48
Its also Aramaic and Hebrew for "The preserver of life."

My name is Umair. I am your opposite ;). Its exact meaning is "The taker of life" or "The bringer of doom."

Oh yeah... Death becomes me.

Wow your name is so cool. Love it. :)

Encore
19-10-09, 00:50
Lolololol.

:ohn:
ADAM, stem cells harvested from a previously unknown species of sea slug, which were discovered by Dr. Bridgette Tenenbaum to have the ability to regenerate damaged tissue and rewrite the human genome.


...OK I'll stop interfering in people's names now. :whi:

Hybrid Soldier
19-10-09, 00:55
LMAO. Where did you even get that definition? :p

rowanlim
19-10-09, 01:18
My name's Jo Ann so this is the closest to it, I guess :D

JOAN (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JON [key]

Medieval English form of Johanne, an Old French feminine form of Iohannes. This was the usual English feminine form of John in the Middle Ages, but it was surpassed in popularity by Jane in the 17th century.

This name (in various spellings) has been common among European royalty, being borne by ruling queens of Naples, Navarre and Castile. Another famous bearer was Joan of Arc, a patron saint of France (where she is known as Jeanne d'Arc). She was a 15th-century peasant girl who, after claiming she heard messages from God, was given leadership of the French army. She defeated the English in the battle of Orléans but was eventually captured and burned at the stake.

In Mandarin my name is Ru Yan, 如 嬊, it means graceful swallow :D
http://i227.photobucket.com/albums/dd164/rowanlim/rl2/ruyan.png

Spong
19-10-09, 01:49
DAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Hebrew, French, German, Scandinavian, Polish, Czech, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Slovene, Biblical, Biblical Greek

Other Scripts: Δανιηλ (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: DAN-yul (English), dah-nee-EL (Hebrew), dan-YEL (French), DAH-nee-el (German), DAHN-yel (Polish) [key]
From the Hebrew name דָּנִיֵּאל (Daniyyel) meaning "God is my judge". Daniel was a Hebrew prophet whose story is told in the Book of Daniel in the Old Testament. He lived during the Jewish captivity in Babylon, where he served in the court of the king, rising to prominence by interpreting the king's dreams. The book also presents Daniel's four visions of the end of the world.

Due to the popularity of the biblical character, the name came into use in England during the Middle Ages. Though it became rare by the 15th century, it was revived after the Protestant Reformation. Famous bearers of this name include English author Daniel Defoe (1660-1731), Swiss mathematician Daniel Bernoulli (1700-1782), and American frontiersman Daniel Boone (1734-1820).

And I just know that's pushed something genuinely useful out of my brain :rolleyes:

Encore
19-10-09, 01:52
LMAO. Where did you even get that definition? :p

It's from Bioshock, and that's what immediately popped in my head when I read "Adam" so clearly I've playing that game too much...

Carbonek_0051
19-10-09, 01:57
NATHANIEL
Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Biblical (Variant)

Pronounced: nay-THAN-ee-əl (English), nay-THAN-yəl (English) [key]

Variant of NATHANAEL. It has been regularly used in the English-speaking world since the Protestant Reformation. This has been the most popular spelling, even though the spelling Nathanael is found in most versions of the New Testament. The American writer Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804-1864), author of 'The Scarlet Letter', was a famous bearer of this name.

NATHANAEL
Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical, Biblical Greek

Other Scripts: Ναθαναηλ (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: nay-THAN-ee-əl (English), nay-THAN-yəl (English) [key]

From the Hebrew name נְתַנְאֵל (Netan'el) meaning "God has given". In the New Testament this was the name of an apostle also known as Bartholomew.

:)

CuteKittenlol
19-10-09, 05:27
ALEXANDRA
Gender: Feminine

Usage: German, Scandinavian, Dutch, French, English, Greek, Portuguese, Romanian, Czech, Hungarian, Slovak, Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology

Other Scripts: Αλεξανδρα (Greek)

Pronounced: ah-lek-SAHN-drah (German), ah-luk-SAHN-drah (Dutch), al-əg-ZAN-drə (English) [key]

Feminine form of ALEXANDER. In Greek mythology this was a Mycenaean epithet of the goddess Hera, and an alternate name of Cassandra. It was borne by several early Christian saints, and also by the wife of Nicholas II, the last czar of Russia. She was from Germany and had the birth name Alix, but was renamed Alexandra upon joining the Russian Church

Hurrah? XD Dont like my full name :)

ALEX
Gender: Masculine & Feminine

Usage: English, Dutch

Pronounced: AL-əks (English, English), AH-ləks (Dutch, Dutch) [key]

Short form of ALEXANDER, ALEXANDRA, and other names beginning with Alex

^ That one deserves a bit of a no **** Sherlock

toughraid3r37
19-10-09, 06:43
BROOKE
Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: BRUWK [key]

Variant of BROOK. The name came into use in the 1950s, probably influenced by American socialite Brooke Astor (1902-2007). It was further popularized by actress Brooke Shields (1965-).

:). You learn something everyday :D.

Johnnay
19-10-09, 07:05
It comes from Anna, so I will post the meaning of Anna over here too:



:D

Great thread Lora!:tmb:

so Ana youre saying that the names, Ana, Marianna, Hanna and Anna are related. wow Ana you have 2 great friends who have a name related to yours( Marianna and Hanna)

anyways heres mine


JOHN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/eng.php), Biblical (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/bibl.php)
Pronounced: JAHN (English) [key] (http://www.behindthename.com/pronunciation.php)

English form of Iohannes, the Latin form of the Greek name Ιωαννης (http://www.behindthename.com/support/transcribe.php?type=GR&target=Iwannhs) (Ioannes), itself derived from the Hebrew name יוֹחָנָן (http://www.behindthename.com/support/transcribe.php?type=HB&target=Ywoh%5Eanan) (Yochanan) meaning "YAHWEH (http://www.behindthename.com/name/yahweh) is gracious". This name owes its popularity to two New Testament (http://www.behindthename.com/glossary/view/new_testament) characters, both highly revered saints (http://www.behindthename.com/glossary/view/saint). The first was John the Baptist, a Jewish ascetic who was considered the forerunner of Jesus Christ. The second was the apostle John, who was also supposedly the author of the fourth Gospel and Revelation.This name was initially more common among Eastern Christians in the Byzantine Empire, but it flourished in Western Europe after the First Crusade. In England it became extremely popular: during the later Middle Ages it was given to approximately a fifth of all English boys.
The name (in various spellings) has been borne by 21 popes and eight Byzantine emperors, as well as rulers of England, France, Sweden, Denmark, Poland, Portugal, Bulgaria, Russia and Hungary. It was also borne by the poet John Milton (1608-1674), philosopher John Locke (1632-1704), American founding father and president John Adams (1735-1826), and poet John Keats (1795-1821). Famous bearers of the 20th century include author John Steinbeck (1902-1968), assassinated American president John F. Kennedy (1917-1963), and musician John Lennon (1940-1980).


my Armenian name


HOVHANNES
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Armenian (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/arm.php)

Armenian form of Iohannes (see JOHN (http://www.behindthename.com/name/john)).

Legend 4ever
19-10-09, 07:13
NIKOLA (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Hungarian, Czech, Slovak, Basque, Old Slavic
Other Scripts: Никола (Serbian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Church Slavic)
Cognate of NICHOLAS

NICHOLAS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: NIK-ə-ləs (English), nee-ko-LA (French) [key]
From the Greek name Νικολαος (Nikolaos) which meant "victory of the people" from Greek νικη (nike) "victory" and λαος (laos) "people". Saint Nicholas was a 4th-century bishop from Anatolia who, according to legend, saved the daughters of a poor man from lives of prostitution. He is the patron saint of children, sailors and merchants, as well as Greece and Russia. He formed the basis for the figure known as Santa Claus (created in the 19th century from Dutch Sinterklaas), the bringer of Christmas presents.
Due to the renown of the saint, this name has been widely used in the Christian world. It has been common in England since the 12th century, though it became a bit less popular after the Protestant Reformation. The name has been borne by five popes and two czars of Russia.

cool_omar
19-10-09, 08:40
OMAR (1)
Gender: Masculine

Usage: Arabic

Other Scripts: عمر (Arabic)

Variant transcription of UMAR

:L

KC Mraz
19-10-09, 08:50
CARLOS

Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese
Pronounced: KAHR-los (Spanish)

Spanish and Portuguese form of CHARLES.

CHARLES

Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: CHAHR-əlz (English), SHARL (French)

From the Germanic name Karl, which was derived from a Germanic word which meant "man". However, an alternative theory states that it is derived from the common Germanic element hari meaning "army, warrior".The popularity of the name in continental Europe was due to the fame of Charles the Great (742-814), commonly known as Charlemagne, a king of the Franks who came to rule over most of Europe. It was subsequently borne by several Holy Roman Emperors, as well as kings of France, Spain, Portugal, Sweden and Hungary. The name did not become common in Britain until the 17th century when it was carried by the Stuart king Charles I. It had been introduced into the Stuart royal family by Mary Queen of Scots, who had been raised in France.
Famous bearers of the name include naturalist Charles Darwin (1809-1882) who revolutionized biology with his theory of evolution, novelist Charles Dickens (1812-1870) who wrote such works as 'Great Expectations' and 'A Tale of Two Cities', French statesman Charles de Gaulle (1890-1970), and American cartoonist Charles Schulz (1922-2000), the creator of the 'Peanuts' comic strip.



Carlos :).

Rivendell
19-10-09, 09:08
CHRISTOPHER

Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KRIS-tə-fər [key]

From the Late Greek name Χριστοφορος (Christophoros) meaning "bearing Christ", derived from Χριστος (Christos) combined with φερω (phero) "to bear, to carry". It was used by early Christians as a metaphorical name, expressing that they carried Christ in their hearts. In the Middle Ages, literal interpretations of the name's etymology led to legends about a Saint Christopher who carried the young Jesus across a river. He has come to be regarded as the patron saint of travellers.

I've another too, which translates as 'Gift from Yaweh / Gift from God'. Don't use it though, as I'm not fond of the name itself.

BlackRainbow
19-10-09, 09:17
The girl's name Hanna \ha(n)-na\ is a variant of Hannah (Hebrew), and the meaning of Hanna is "grace of God".

I think I've heard it also means "merciful", but I'm not so sure.

:D

john_york
19-10-09, 09:18
.
JOHN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Biblical

Pronounced: JAHN (English) [key]
English form of Iohannes, the Latin form of the Greek name Ιωαννης (Ioannes), itself derived from the Hebrew name יוֹחָנָן (Yochanan) meaning "YAHWEH is gracious". This name owes its popularity to two New Testament characters, both highly revered saints. The first was John the Baptist, a Jewish ascetic who was considered the forerunner of Jesus Christ. The second was the apostle John, who was also supposedly the author of the fourth Gospel and Revelation.

sandygrimm
19-10-09, 10:54
SANDRA

Usage: Italian (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/ita.php), English (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/eng.php), Portuguese (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/por.php), German (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/ger.php), Dutch (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/dut.php), Scandinavian (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/sca.php), Finnish (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/fin.php), Latvian (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/lat.php), Lithuanian (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/lth.php), Slovene (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/sln.php)
Pronounced: SAHN-drah (Italian, Dutch), SAN-drə (English), ZAHN-drah (German)

Short form of ALESSANDRA (http://www.behindthename.com/name/alessandra). It was introduced to the English-speaking world by author George Meredith, who used it for the heroine in his novel 'Emilia in England' (1864) and the reissued version 'Sandra Belloni' (1887).

and

Meaning of "Sandra"
Greek name http://www.meaning-of-names.com/images/spacer.gif

In Greek, the name Sandra means- helper of humanity. Other origins for the name Sandra include - Greek, English.

LightningRider
19-10-09, 11:11
Chaska didn't pop up, but it means first born child, which I am. :D

Admles
19-10-09, 11:47
My first name:

DAVID

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Hebrew, French, Spanish, Portuguese, Russian, Czech, Slovene, German, Scandinavian, Dutch, Biblical, Biblical Latin

Other Scripts: דָּוִד (Hebrew), Давид (Russian)

Pronounced: DAY-vid (English), dah-VEED (Hebrew), da-VEED (French), dah-VEET (Russian), DAH-fit (German), DAH-vit (Dutch) [key]
From the Hebrew name דָּוִד (Dawid), which was probably derived from Hebrew דוד (dwd) meaning "beloved". David was the second and greatest of the kings of Israel, ruling in the 10th century BC. Several stories about him are told in the Old Testament, including his defeat of Goliath, a giant Philistine. Jesus was supposedly descended from him.

This name has been used in Britain since the Middle Ages. It has been especially popular in Wales, where it is used in honour of the 5th-century patron saint of Wales (also called Dewi), as well as in Scotland, where it was borne by two kings. Famous bearers include empiricist philosopher David Hume (1711-1776) and explorer David Livingstone (1813-1873). This is also the name of the hero of Charles Dickens' semiautobiographical novel 'David Copperfield' (1850).

My middle name (my father's first name):

STAFFORD

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: STAF-ərd [key]
From a surname which was from a place name meaning "landing-place ford" in Old English.

and my surname:

SMITH

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: SMITH [key]
From an English surname meaning "blacksmith", derived from Old English smitan "to smite, to hit". It is the most common surname in the English-speaking world.

scoopy_loopy
19-10-09, 13:12
My name is Joshua and it comes from Yeshu'a which is "the real name" for Jesus.

JOSHUA
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/eng.php), Biblical (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/bibl.php)
Pronounced: JAH-shə-wə (English), JAW-shwə (English) [key] (http://www.behindthename.com/pronunciation.php)

From the Hebrew name יְהוֹשֻׁעַ (http://www.behindthename.com/support/transcribe.php?type=HB&target=Y%3Ahwos%5Eu%5E%22a%5E) (Yehoshu'a) meaning "YAHWEH (http://www.behindthename.com/name/yahweh) is salvation". Joshua was one of the twelve spies sent into Canaan by Moses in the Old Testament (http://www.behindthename.com/glossary/view/old_testament). After Moses died Joshua succeeded him as leader of the Israelites. As an English name, Joshua has been in use since the Protestant Reformation (http://www.behindthename.com/glossary/view/protestant_reformation).The name Jesus (http://www.behindthename.com/name/jesus) comes from a Greek translation of the Aramaic short form יֵשׁוּעַ (http://www.behindthename.com/support/transcribe.php?type=HB&target=Yes%5Ewu%22a%5E) (Yeshu'a), which was the real name of Jesus.

violentblossom
19-10-09, 13:46
My name isn't on there. What a surprise.

TRhalloween
19-10-09, 13:47
SHANIQUA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (African American, Modern)

Pronounced: shə-NEE-kwə [key]
Combination of the popular name elements Shan and qua

ClassicCroft
19-10-09, 14:08
Carmen
Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish, English, Romanian

Pronounced: KAHR-men (Spanish), KAHR-mən (English) [key]

Medieval Spanish form of CARMEL influenced by the Latin word carmen "song". This was the name of the main character in George Bizet's opera 'Carmen' (1875).

]{eith
19-10-09, 14:16
KEITH

Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/eng.php), Scottish (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/sco.php) Pronounced: KEETH [key] (http://www.behindthename.com/pronunciation.php)

From a Scottish surname which was originally derived from a place name, itself probably derived from British cet meaning "wood" (lol). This was the surname of a long line of Scottish earls. It has been used as a given name since the 19th century.

Rai
19-10-09, 14:20
My name isn't on there. What a surprise.

Why not split it and look for the individual meanings and then combine them yourself? Rae on its own is just down as the short version of Rachel.

violentblossom
19-10-09, 14:22
Why not split it and look for the individual meanings and then combine them yourself? Rae on its own is just down as the short version of Rachel.

Good thinkin'. If that's what they gave "Rae", though, then I don't really feel like bothering. :p

I might make up my own. :whi:

Archetype
19-10-09, 14:23
BENJAMIN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French, German, Dutch, Biblical

Pronounced: BEN-jə-min (English), ben-zha-MEN (French), BEN-yah-meen (German) [key]
From the Hebrew name בִּנְיָמִין (Binyamin) which means "son of the south" or "son of the right hand". Benjamin in the Old Testament was the twelfth and youngest son of Jacob and the founder of one of the southern tribes of the Hebrews. He was originally named בֶּן־אוֹנִי (Ben-'oniy) meaning "son of my sorrow" by his mother Rachel, who died shortly after childbirth, but it was later changed by his father.

As an English name, Benjamin came into general use after the Protestant Reformation. A famous bearer was Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790), an American statesman, inventor, scientist and philosopher.

Rai
19-10-09, 14:23
Good thinkin'. If that's what they gave "Rae", though, then I don't really feel like bothering. :p

I might make up my own. :whi:

Yeah Rachel is just yawnsome (it is mine). It means Ewe.

The rest is anne isn't it? (sorry for the spelling :o.

violentblossom
19-10-09, 14:26
RAEANNE

from the Chinese "RAEANNE IS AMAZING".

Meaning "Bringer of Spectacular and Fun."

And you're correct, Rai. :D

GenyaArikado
19-10-09, 14:29
EDUARDO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Spanish, Portuguese

Pronounced: e-DHWAHR-do (Spanish) [key]
Spanish and Portuguese form of EDWARD


EDWARD

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Polish

Pronounced: ED-wərd (English), ED-vahrt (Polish) [key]
Means "rich guard", derived from the Old English elements ead "rich, blessed" and weard "guard". Saint Edward the Confessor was the king of England shortly before the Norman conquest. He was known as a just ruler, and because of his popularity this name remained in use after the conquest when most other Old English names were replaced by Norman ones. The 13th-century king Henry III named his son and successor after the saint, and seven subsequent kings of England were also named Edward. This is one of the few Old English names to be used throughout Europe (in various spellings)..

Rai
19-10-09, 14:33
^ :vlol: That's great, Raeanne! I think we should all make our own up. So much more fun. :p

ShadyCroft
19-10-09, 15:34
SHADI (1)

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Arabic

Other Scripts: شادي (Arabic)
Means "singer" in Arabic.

Yes, it means "singer". :) But I write my name with a "y", not "i" as a lot of people do.
"Shady".

Chocola teapot
19-10-09, 15:46
SHANIQUA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (African American, Modern)

Pronounced: shə-NEE-kwə [key]
Combination of the popular name elements Shan and qua

Ahahaha! Win! :D

Minimus
19-10-09, 19:17
My name is Daniel, but everyone calls me Mini Me. But obviously that's not a real name, so...


DANIEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Hebrew, French, German, Scandinavian, Polish, Czech, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Slovene, Biblical, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Δανιηλ (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: DAN-yul (English), dah-nee-EL (Hebrew), dan-YEL (French), DAH-nee-el (German), DAHN-yel (Polish) [key]
From the Hebrew name דָּנִיֵּאל (Daniyyel) meaning "God is my judge". Daniel was a Hebrew prophet whose story is told in the Book of Daniel in the Old Testament. He lived during the Jewish captivity in Babylon, where he served in the court of the king, rising to prominence by interpreting the king's dreams. The book also presents Daniel's four visions of the end of the world.
Due to the popularity of the biblical character, the name came into use in England during the Middle Ages. Though it became rare by the 15th century, it was revived after the Protestant Reformation. Famous bearers of this name include English author Daniel Defoe (1660-1731), Swiss mathematician Daniel Bernoulli (1700-1782), and American frontiersman Daniel Boone (1734-1820).



The origins of my name are quite the opposite of my opinions.

msalpha2omega
19-10-09, 19:21
Unfortunately, same as Dina Croft stated before, there's only the masculine version of my name...... :mad:

Minimus
19-10-09, 19:22
Unfortunately, same as Dina Croft stated before, there's only the masculine version of my name...... :mad:

Aww lol :o

I, Tomb Raider
19-10-09, 19:49
IVAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian, Serbian, Croatian,Macedonian,Czech, Slovene, English
Other Scripts: Иван (Russian, Bulgarian, Serbian,Macedonian), Іван (Ukrainian)
Pronounced: ee-VAHN (Russian), IE-vən

I, Tomb Raider
19-10-09, 20:06
do you want to know your robotic name maybe?
this is how my goes
http://i36.************/144d94.jpg
http://cyborg.namedecoder.com/ :D:D:D

Nerd For Life
19-10-09, 20:10
{eith;4103842']KEITH

Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/eng.php), Scottish (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/sco.php) Pronounced: KEETH [key] (http://www.behindthename.com/pronunciation.php)

From a Scottish surname which was originally derived from a place name, itself probably derived from British cet meaning "wood" (lol). This was the surname of a long line of Scottish earls. It has been used as a given name since the 19th century.

LOLOL. :cln:

do you want to know your robotic name maybe?
this is how my goes

http://cyborg.namedecoder.com/ :D:D:D

http://cyborg.namedecoder.com/webimages/edox-RAQUEL.png

:p

ShadyCroft
19-10-09, 20:57
http://cyborg.namedecoder.com/webimages/edox-SHADY.png

haha! those are nice !

touchthesky
19-10-09, 20:59
VICTORIA (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Spanish, Romanian, Late Roman

Pronounced: vik-TOR-ee-ə (English) [key]
Feminine form of VICTORIUS, though later it was regarded as coming directly from Latin victoria meaning "victory". It was borne by a 4th-century saint and martyr from North Africa. Though in use elsewhere in Europe, the name was very rare in the English-speaking world until the 19th century, when Queen Victoria began her long rule of Britain. She was named after her mother, who was of German royalty. Many geographic areas are named after the queen, including an Australian state and a Canadian city.

:)

Reggie
19-10-09, 21:01
http://cyborg.namedecoder.com/webimages/governor3k3-TOM.png

]{eith
19-10-09, 21:05
http://i906.photobucket.com/albums/ac261/Cynical_Hippie/edox-KEITH.png

Infiltration? Definitely!
Troubleshooting!? HA!

Rai
19-10-09, 21:09
What they hey, I'll be a robot:
http://cyborg.namedecoder.com/webimages/yamasora-RACHEL.png

Or Rai = Robotic.Artificial.Individual. <---Simple

WCookie
19-10-09, 21:15
http://cyborg.namedecoder.com/webimages/governor3k3-ABEL+.png

January_Snow*
19-10-09, 21:16
http://cyborg.namedecoder.com/webimages/governor3k3-NIKOLA.png

xXhayleyroxXx
19-10-09, 21:17
lol i cant figure out how to do it hahahah

how do you get the robot avatar on here?

Squibbly
19-10-09, 21:18
http://cyborg.namedecoder.com/webimages/governor3k3-ASHLEY.png

What? :confused: lol


Here is yours Hayley. :)

http://cyborg.namedecoder.com/webimages/governor3k3-HAYLEY.png

I just right clicked on it, went to "view image" and then changed the name at the end of the link in caps to my own (and then yours).

xXhayleyroxXx
19-10-09, 21:20
http://cyborg.namedecoder.com/webimages/governor3k3-ASHLEY.png

What? :confused: lol


Here is yours Hayley. :)

http://cyborg.namedecoder.com/webimages/governor3k3-HAYLEY.png

haha thanks! i love how everyone else figured out how to do it but me hahah

oh dear

aquaflute
19-10-09, 21:31
http://cyborg.namedecoder.com/webimages/handyvac-DONGCHEN.png

DONG
Gender: Masculine

Usage: Chinese, Korean

Other Scripts: 东, 栋 (Chinese), 동 (Korean)

From Chinese 东 "east" or 栋 "pillar, beam". It also means "east" in Korean

CHEN
Gender: Masculine & Feminine

Usage: Chinese

Other Scripts: 晨, 辰 (Chinese)

From Chinese 晨 or 辰 which both mean "morning".



Although the meaning for Chen is actually dragon or stars in my case. The second chen. The first means morning correct.

Rai
19-10-09, 21:51
haha thanks! i love how everyone else figured out how to do it but me hahah

oh dear

If it's any consolation, I didn't know what to do either. I copied the whole code they gave me and when that didn't work, I looked for the bit after img, took out everything else then put in img tags. That's the long way to do it and I was guessing :o :p

Thorir
19-10-09, 21:58
It's Norse and means might, power, force.
It's also the name of a Norse god. Son of Thor, grandson of Odin.

I'm named after my grandfather.

I, Tomb Raider
19-10-09, 22:03
damn it, the robo names are so funny, lol!

xXhayleyroxXx
19-10-09, 22:06
If it's any consolation, I didn't know what to do either. I copied the whole code they gave me and when that didn't work, I looked for the bit after img, took out everything else then put in img tags. That's the long way to do it and I was guessing :o :p

aww thanks for telling me that hunni :hug: i dont feel as silly now haha xx

Crisl
20-10-09, 10:51
Quite a long path :)

KRISTÝNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Czech
Czech variant of KRISTINA
--->
KRISTINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Scandinavian, Russian, German, Slovene, Czech, Lithuanian, Serbian, Croatian, English, Bulgarian
Other Scripts: Кристина (Russian, Serbian, Bulgarian)
Pronounced: kris-TEE-nah (German) [key]
Cognate of CHRISTINA, and a Bulgarian variant of HRISTINA.
--->
CHRISTINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Scandinavian, Dutch
Pronounced: kris-TEEN-ə (English), kris-TEE-nah (German, Dutch) [key]
From Christiana, the Latin feminine form of CHRISTIAN. This was the name of an early, possibly legendary, saint who was tormented by her pagan father. It was also borne by a 17th-century Swedish queen and patron the arts who gave up her crown in order to become a Roman Catholic.

LaraCroftRox
20-10-09, 14:24
SHANICE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (African American, Modern)

Pronounced: sha-NEES
Combination of the popular name elements Shan and ice.



http://cyborg.namedecoder.com/webimages/edox-SHANICE.png

:p

igonge
20-10-09, 14:37
KELD

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Danish
Danish form of KETTIL

KETTIL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Swedish
Derived from Old Norse ketill meaning "kettle, cauldron" (later also acquiring the meaning "helmet"). In old Scandinavian rituals the ketill was used to catch the blood of sacrificed animals.



...O.o

ViNi__
20-10-09, 14:57
VINÍCIUS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Portuguese
Portuguese form of Vinicius (see VINICIO).
VINICIO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Italian, Spanish
Italian and Spanish form of the Roman name Vinicius, which was possibly derived from Latin vinum "wine".

I'm a wine ._.
lol

Kelly Craftman
20-10-09, 17:40
MAI (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Vietnamese
Means "apricot blossom" in Vietnamese. Popularity

MAI (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 舞, 麻衣, 真愛 (Japanese)
From Japanese 舞 "dance" or 麻衣 "linen robe". It can also come from 真 (ma) "real, true" combined with 愛 (ai) "love, affection".


Mai is my second name

Joely-Moley
20-10-09, 17:42
JOEL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Biblical

Pronounced: JOL (English), JO-əl (English) [key]
From the Hebrew name יוֹאֵל (Yo'el) meaning "YAHWEH is God". Joel was a minor prophet in the Old Testament, the author of the Book of Joel. In England, it was first used as a Christian name after the Protestant Reformation.

It's weird, considering none of my family are religious.

Reggie
20-10-09, 17:54
It's weird, considering none of my family are religious.
I suppose it just shows how religion has entered the common psyche without us even knowing. People name our children after religious figures without even knowing! It becomes part of the culture I guess.

pinklaralover
04-12-09, 11:13
SAVANNAH
Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: sə-VAN-ə [key]

From the English word for the large grassy plain, ultimately deriving from the Taino (Native American) word zabana. It came into use as a given name in America in the 19th century. It was revived in the 1980s by the movie 'Savannah Smiles' (1982).

:D

nielsen145
04-12-09, 11:29
DANNY
Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: DAN-ee [key]

Diminutive of DANIEL

other:
Meaning: Its source is a Hebrew expression meaning "My judge is God."

Languages: This boy's name is used in Hebrew and English.

Nickname For: Dan and Daniel

Popularity: The name Danny ranked 279th in popularity for males of all ages in a sample of 2000-2003 Social Security Administration statistics and 101st in popularity for males of all ages in a sample of the 1990 US Census.

This name is highly rated in the 1990 U.S. Census popularity survey of all ages, but after 1960 does not appear in the state data listing the most popular baby names.

Narrative: The story of Daniel's abiding faith, even when cast into the lions' den, is told in the Book of Daniel in the Jewish scriptures.

In addition to stories of Daniel's trials at the Persian court, the book features symbolic imagery of fantastic animals, world-wide cataclysms, and the ending and beginning of epochs. It set the pattern for the Christian Book of Revelations, and scholars of both faiths continue to debate its ultimate meaning.

There is some scholarly support for the theory that Daniel was a mythic character, pre-dating even ancient Biblical writings. As we might anticipate given the meaning of his name, these early myths portray Daniel as a judge with a high reputation for wisdom and piety.
source: babynamer.com

Tomb-Dude
04-12-09, 11:52
Mines very simple...

JAKE
Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: JAYK [key]

Medieval variant of JACK. It is also sometimes used as a short form of JACOB.

Also done the name I would of been called if mum had her way :p

DENVER
Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: DEN-vər [key]

From an English surname which was from a place name meaning "Dane ford" in Old English. This is the name of the capital city of Colorado, which was named for the politician James W. Denver (1817-1892).

Vinkula
04-12-09, 11:54
VILLE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Finnish
Finnish short form of WILLIAM

That's all what I got from this page ;o

Amenophis
04-12-09, 21:20
Name: SHADY

Gender: Masculine
Usage: Egypt/Arabic
Other Scripts: شادي (Arabic)
Means "singer" in Arabic.

-DaNnEe..
04-12-09, 21:28
DANIEL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Hebrew, French, German, Scandinavian, Polish, Czech, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Slovene, Biblical, Biblical Greek

Other Scripts: Δανιηλ (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: DAN-yul (English), dah-nee-EL (Hebrew), dan-YEL (French), DAH-nee-el (German), DAHN-yel (Polish) [key]
From the Hebrew name דָּנִיֵּאל (Daniyyel) meaning "God is my judge". Daniel was a Hebrew prophet whose story is told in the Book of Daniel in the Old Testament. He lived during the Jewish captivity in Babylon, where he served in the court of the king, rising to prominence by interpreting the king's dreams. The book also presents Daniel's four visions of the end of the world.

Due to the popularity of the biblical character, the name came into use in England during the Middle Ages. Though it became rare by the 15th century, it was revived after the Protestant Reformation. Famous bearers of this name include English author Daniel Defoe (1660-1731), Swiss mathematician Daniel Bernoulli (1700-1782), and American frontiersman Daniel Boone (1734-1820).

Lara Coft Baby
04-12-09, 21:37
My name is spelled Katye but of course no one else spells it that way. so this is the closest

KATIE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: KAY-tee [key]
Diminutive of KATE

My nick name
KATE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Croatian

Pronounced: KAYT (English) [key]
Diminutive of KATHERINE. It has been used in England since the Middle Ages. This was the name of the woman who Petruchio marries and tries to tame in Shakespeare's comedy 'Taming of the Shrew' (1593).

peeves
04-12-09, 22:42
BRIAN
Gender: Masculine

Usage: Irish, English, Ancient Irish

Pronounced: BRIE-ən (Irish, English) [key]

The meaning of this name is not known for certain but it is possibly related to the old Celtic element bre meaning "hill", or by extension "high, noble". It was borne by the semi-legendary Irish king Brian Boru, who thwarted Viking attempts to conquer Ireland in the 11th century. He was slain in the Battle of Clontarf, though his forces were decisively victorious. The name was common in Ireland before his time, and even more so afterwards. It came into use in England in the Middle Ages, introduced by Breton settlers. It subsequently became rare, but was revived in the 20th century.

Verdilet
04-12-09, 23:00
GEORGE
Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Romanian

Pronounced: JORJ (English) [key]

From the Greek name Γεωργιος (Georgios) which was derived from the Greek word γεωργος (georgos) meaning "farmer, earthworker", itself derived from the elements γη (ge) "earth" and εργον (ergon) "work". Saint George was a 3rd-century Roman soldier from Palestine who was martyred during the persecutions of emperor Diocletian. Later legends describe his defeat of a dragon, with which he was often depicted in medieval art.
Initially Saint George was primarily revered by Eastern Christians, but returning crusaders brought stories of him to Western Europe and he became the patron of England, Portugal, Catalonia and Aragon. The name was rarely used in England until the German-born George I came to the British throne in the 18th century. Five subsequent British kings have borne the name.

Other famous bearers include two kings of Greece, the composer George Frideric Handel (1685-1759), the first president of the United States, George Washington (1732-1797), and the Pacific explorer George Vancouver (1757-1798). This was also the pen name of authors George Eliot (1819-1880) and George Orwell (1903-1950), real names Mary Anne Evans and Eric Arthur Blair respectively.

Apparently I'm a farmer.

lara c. fan
05-12-09, 15:57
DANIEL
Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Hebrew, French, German, Scandinavian, Polish, Czech, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Slovene, Biblical, Biblical Greek

Other Scripts: Δανιηλ (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: DAN-yul (English), dah-nee-EL (Hebrew), dan-YEL (French), DAH-nee-el (German), DAHN-yel (Polish) [key]

From the Hebrew name דָּנִיֵּאל (Daniyyel) meaning "God is my judge". Daniel was a Hebrew prophet whose story is told in the Book of Daniel in the Old Testament. He lived during the Jewish captivity in Babylon, where he served in the court of the king, rising to prominence by interpreting the king's dreams. The book also presents Daniel's four visions of the end of the world.
Due to the popularity of the biblical character, the name came into use in England during the Middle Ages. Though it became rare by the 15th century, it was revived after the Protestant Reformation. Famous bearers of this name include English author Daniel Defoe (1660-1731), Swiss mathematician Daniel Bernoulli (1700-1782), and American frontiersman Daniel Boone (1734-1820).

Yay!

nielsen145
05-12-09, 15:59
Yay!

Yes ;), my name comes from Daniel :P

o0Crofty0o
05-12-09, 16:04
ANGELA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, German, Dutch, Romanian, Slovene, Slovak, Russian, Late Roman
Other Scripts: Ангела (Russian)
Pronounced: AN-jəl-ə (English), AHN-je-lah (Italian), AHNG-ge-lah (German) [key]
Feminine form of Angelus (see ANGEL). As an English name, it came into use in the 18th century.

:D

amalitsa
05-12-09, 17:43
Amalia

Used in:
Dutch, English, German and Hebrew speaking countries

Shortened form of a Germanic amal- name ['amal' meaning 'work, labor, effort, strain'] such as Amalberga.

Amalia may also be taken as a variant of the Hebrew Amalya, meaning "work of the Lord".

Amalia of Oldenburg was the Queen of Greece in the 19th century. Her husband, King Otto, was the first modern King of Greece, and was deposed in 1862.

Princess Catharina-Amalia - known as Princess Amalia - is the daughter of the heir-apparent to the throne of the Netherlands, Prince Willem-Alexander. She was named Amalia after her ancestor Amalia of Solm-Braunfels, whose grandson became William III of England.

i have a fierce name or what?!?!

Los Angeles
05-12-09, 18:19
Interesting thread! :tmb:

VictorXD
05-12-09, 18:23
VICTOR

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French, Portuguese, Romanian, Late Roman

Pronounced: VIK-tər (English), veek-TOR (French) [key]
Roman name meaning "victor" in Latin. It was common among early Christians, and was borne by several early saints and three popes. It was rare as an English name during the Middle Ages, but it was revived in the 19th century. A famous bearer was the French writer Victor Hugo (1802-1885), who wrote 'The Hunchback of Notre Dame' and 'Les Misérables'.


I always liked my name:p