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Neteru
28-11-04, 05:32
http://newsimg.bbc.co.uk/media/images/40571000/jpg/_40571477_gilmour203.jpg

Former schoolchildren who sang on Pink Floyd's 1979 single Another Brick in The Wall have begun action for unpaid royalties.

Royalties expert Peter Rowan said he was appealing on behalf of one former pupil and was working with others.

The 23 then teenagers from north London have been unable to claim royalties as they recorded their vocals in secret.

The single with its chorus "We Don't Need No Education" became a children's anthem and was a UK and US number one.

The album The Wall, on which the single features, sold more than 12 million copies.

The album was also turned into a semi-animated 1982 film, starring Bob Geldof of as a pop star who descends into madness.

Mr Rowan said: "They (the former schoolchildren) are owed their money and we lodged the first claim last week. I've been working on it for almost two years."

'Scandalous' lyrics

The then pupils from Islington Green School, north London, were taken to a nearby recording studio by their music teacher but without permission from the headmistress.

On hearing the song, she banned the pupils from appearing on TV or video, meaning they had no proof of their involvement on the track.

The lyrics "We don't need no education, we don't need no thought control, no dark sarcasm in the classroom -- teachers leave them kids alone" were also described by the Inner London Education Authority as "scandalous".

Full story bbc.co.uk (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/entertainment/music/4047533.stm)

Nicky
28-11-04, 09:56
Originally posted by Neteru:
On hearing the song, she banned the pupils from appearing on TV or video, meaning they had no proof of their involvement on the track.
I guess she would have let them appear on TV if she had been asked to accompany them herself and appear on air too, LOL http://www.tombraiderforums.com/images/smilies/tongue.gif :D

Neteru
28-11-04, 10:40
You know, I remember this song being in the charts and reaching number one. And it was controversial. It caused quite an atmosphere in schools amongst pupils and teachers. I think it made pupils feel a whole lot braver in standing up to the tyranny of teachers (as they still were when I was at school in the 70's, and it also made teachers afraid of pupils standing up to them. I would guess this headmistresses 'banning' was an effort so typical of those in positions of power to assert that power when it was most threatened. This may seem hyperbole in reading and writing it now, but my memory of schools in the 70's was as a situation where tyrannical adults did reign with fear and intimidation over powerless children.

Nicky
28-11-04, 11:38
Morning http://www.tombraiderforums.com/images/smilies/wave.gif

I would guess this headmistresses 'banning' was an effort so typical of those in positions of power to assert that power when it was most threatened. Yes, exactly. I wasn't at school yet when this song was in the charts, but I remember very well another instance: much later, in 1990-91, due to some very strict measures that were to be taken about schools and education in general, there was an incredibly massive protest at schools all over the country: the high-schools were practically closed as the students locked themselves in the buildings and refused to attend the courses, and this lasted for about three months or more. This song of Pink Floyd was heard all over the place in my high school back then, every day. It was amazing how, so many years after its first release, it was still to the point and fitting for this situation.

There was a slight difference in that case, though: most of the teachers were on the side of the students, so the protesting voice was mostly aimed at the government, but still the effect and the influence of those lyrics were the same.

[ 28. November 2004, 11:45: Message edited by: Nicky ]