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tlr online
17-11-09, 15:33
Staff at one of the UK's major mobile phone companies sold on millions of records from thousands of customers, the information watchdog says. Christopher Graham told the BBC that brokers had bought the data and sold it on to other phone firms, who called the customers as contracts neared expiry.

The suspected trade emerged after the firm alerted the watchdog. Mr Graham is planning to prosecute those involved. He said he had not named the company in order not to prejudice a future trial.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/8364421.stm

:yik:

Anyone know the name of the company?

Phys
17-11-09, 15:34
Probably orange :p I've always hated them.

Edit: I just found this on another website:

Vodafone, O2, Orange and 3 have all said they were not the subject of the ICO investigation.

Calls to T Mobile were not returned.

tlr online
17-11-09, 15:36
Second comment (http://www.theregister.co.uk/2009/11/17/ico_mobile_data/comments/) is very clever. From numerous articles from numerous publications, no one is saying who it is.

tlr online
17-11-09, 15:38
Probably orange :p I've always hated them.

Edit: I just found this on another website:
I have two contracts with T-Mobile. I sure hope it isn't them because I will cancel them both.

Trigger_happy
17-11-09, 15:38
If it is T-Mobile, its possible that their records include everyone on Virgin Mobile, as VM 'rent' their phonelines.

Then again, no company is going to admit selling their customer records on, so it could be one of the ones that denied everything.

Phys
17-11-09, 15:39
I have two contracts with T-Mobile. I sure hope it isn't them because I will cancel them both.

I'm on Vodafone luckily.

tlr online
17-11-09, 15:40
If it is T-Mobile, its possible that their records include everyone on Virgin Mobile, as VM 'rent' their phonelines.

Then again, no company is going to admit selling their customer records on, so it could be one of the ones that denied everything.

I've received calls from the past on my business and private line from marketeers. At the time T-Mobile denied calling me but put both my numbers on a list which would prevent it being accessible to anyone.

Again. I sure hope this isn't them.

peeves
17-11-09, 15:40
I have optimum phone network

Draco
17-11-09, 15:53
I used to have T-Mobile, I still owe them money lol.

Mad Tony
17-11-09, 16:25
I think it is T-Mobile. On the BBC website it has a breaking news banner about it at the top.

Legend of Lara
17-11-09, 16:29
I have optimum phone network

Which wouldn't make a difference, seeing as how this happened in the UK. :p

jackles
17-11-09, 17:22
To follow up what MT said....

T mobile staff sold personal data (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/8364421.stm)

Cochrane
17-11-09, 17:25
Oh boy… This should never happen, but I hope that at least it's UK only (no offense). T-mobile is the only way to get an iPhone here, so I don't really have much of a choice.

Nenya awakens
17-11-09, 17:44
When I was with T-mobile I used to get cold calls all the time, since I switched back to o2 not a single one.

tlr online
17-11-09, 17:46
I will be cancelling both my contracts with T-Mobile. This would explain why I received cold calls some months ago.

Phys
17-11-09, 18:00
To follow up what MT said....

T mobile staff sold personal data (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/8364421.stm)

I had a feeling it would be T-Mobile since no reply was received from them. I wonder how many people will cancel their contracts because of this.

Phlip
17-11-09, 18:00
If there was supposed to be some sort of merge of T-mobile and Orange then it's not that bad. I'm on T-mobile and if there is a merge then I'm fine with it. :) Unless I'm being naive, or that doesn't even cut it.

lara c. fan
17-11-09, 18:00
I was PAYG on T-Mobile up until about over half a year ago.

*wipes brow*

Trigger_happy
17-11-09, 18:14
I kept getting calls from Unknown numbers, but I never answered them... because I was always on the loo when they phoned...:whi:

It could have been just people being silly, but T-mobile could have my records, even though I'm on Virgin.

*richietrent*
17-11-09, 23:23
If there was supposed to be some sort of merge of T-mobile and Orange then it's not that bad. I'm on T-mobile and if there is a merge then I'm fine with it. :) Unless I'm being naive, or that doesn't even cut it.

Im on Orange, so i hope nothing goes pear-shaped like this crap! Otherwise they can kiss my custom goodbye :p

patriots88888
17-11-09, 23:33
Why am I not surprised?

Answer: Because there's more going on in the exchange of personal info these days than most know about. I've had my personal info sold by just about every company I've done business with. It's all about them getting that precious green any way possible.

Nothing quite beats having a telemarketer explain to you how they happened upon certain personal info. You want my business, then you better at least be honest and upfront and reveal your source. Otherwise *click*!

disneyprincess20
18-11-09, 11:37
El Reg (http://www.theregister.co.uk/2009/11/18/t_mobile_data_theft/)'s take on the ICO announcement.

The Information Commissioner's Office (ICO) is trying to whip up support for custodial sentences for those convicted of stealing data, but public sympathy for celebrities who had their phone records stolen is minimal. The T-Mobile case, on the other hand, demonstrates why normal people should care too, which is why the details came out in the Commissioner's response to the Government consultation about the introduction of prison sentences.

T-Mobile seemingly couldn't have handled the case better. The operator received complaints that customers were getting curiously well-informed cold calls, so T-Mobile investigated - as operators are surprisingly willing to do. It took its evidence to the ICO, who investigated further and told the operator to say nothing to anybody until the case was complete.

But that restriction didn't apply to the ICO, who published the details to support its argument. The ICO didn't name the operator, but it didn't take long to get denials out of all the other operators, forcing T-Mobile to admit it was them, despite promising the ICO they wouldn't say anything.

As for the data stolen, it mainly consisted of customer details and contract end dates - annoying to have public but not exactly state secrets. Customer details are in the phone book, and most people will tell you their contract renewal date if you call them up and ask (as cold callers are wont to do).

Whether one approves of custodial sentences for nicking data, or not, it's clear that the ICO has manipulated this case into a cause celebre with impact far beyond its real importance.


Pretty interesting stuff. Maybe the ICO was just as in the wrong as T-Mobile. At least T-Mobile were in the process of investigating before handing it to the ICO. It's kind of a shame that this is how the information got out, so the ICO could support their own argument. A breach of confidentiality against those who have breached confidentiality. So who is in the wrong?