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View Full Version : College Degrees More Expensive, Worth Less. My advice to high schoolers


Solice
10-12-09, 05:20
story (http://news.yahoo.com/s/time/20091209/us_time/08599194608800)

I have a four year degree in Management. I could not find a good job with my general education. I really did not have any 'skill' I could bring to an employer. So I went back to school, this time a community college with job training, and learned computer programming. That is when I finally made it in the workplace.

My point is; a four year degree is not necessarily a ticket to a great job. You can end up with a huge debt and no real skill to offer the marketplace.

If I was starting out now, I would first focus on getting a job skill, then later enhance my knowledge with a four year degree. Or make sure I have a skill built into my degree program, like accounting for a business major.

miss.haggard
10-12-09, 05:28
Thats what Ive been pushing the whole time, and trust me, I get some dirty looks from people when they hear that Im 19 and not going to college.

Its better to enter the work force, get some experience, find out what you REALLY want to do, then decide to go to college. And you may never even get to the college point. My manager at Sherwin Williams took only basic classes at a community college and after being with the business for 12 years rose to his rank. There are many other stories I could tell about people who just worked hard and received all the knowledge they needed.

Thats something I really dont see in our generation, kids dont see the potential of good ol' fashioned hard work! They expect to do decent in college, graduate, and be handed a job. Well Im sorry little Jimmy, its not that darn easy.

EmeraldFields
10-12-09, 05:30
Not saying that you guys are wrong, but this goes against everything everyone has ever told me during my time in school.:p

Catapharact
10-12-09, 05:34
I don't see specialization training with your degree Solice. While getting a management degree increases your chances for landing a high aspected career, in today's job market, where the competition is stiff, you need to have a specilization creditial added on to your degree. I have specialized traning in three areas along with my management degree.

And offcourse, like any other given field of work, experience counts. I was hired on an "Ivoy Tower" position fast because of the fact that I had extensive experience working with NGOs; Particularly Oxfam.

Melonie Tomb Raider
10-12-09, 05:45
I have an Associates Degree in Information Technology, but I definitely feel like I need to continue my education and get a Bachelors degree. Of course you need hands on training, but it's a known fact that people with degrees get paid significantly more than people without them. Just the same, people with Bachelors degrees get paid a lot more than people with Associates degrees. I'm very proud of the degree I have, but I don't really get any raised eyebrows for it on my applications, because it's just an Associates.

Ideally, one would have both training and a four year (or more :p) degree. I would stress that more than simply one or the other.

AmericanAssassin
10-12-09, 05:56
I'm going to be a teacher. A four year degree is exactly what I need. Although, I'm going further and getting my masters. ;)

LaraLuvrrr
10-12-09, 06:01
I disagree. I think a Master's these days is a bad investment unless you get an MBA.

Any bachelor's degree will increase your pay more than a high school diploma. However I agree that just getting a degree is not enough. Work experience and the 4 year degree have to go hand and hand. Which is why 2 internships during Uni is the new norm.

Quasimodo
10-12-09, 06:03
I'm going to be a teacher. A four year degree is exactly what I need. Although, I'm going further and getting my masters. ;)

Same here. I'd probably make quicker and better money studying to be a nurse, x-ray lab technician, or computer programmer - but I want to be doing something I'm at least halfway passionate about:p

AmericanAssassin
10-12-09, 06:05
^ *High Fives* :D

Any bachelor's degree will increase your pay more than a high school diploma. However I agree that just getting a degree is not enough. Work experience and the 4 year degree have to go hand and hand. Which is why 2 internships during Uni is the new norm.

Most teachers do some student teaching during their college years. I don't know what other experience I could get...

Quasimodo
10-12-09, 06:07
^ *High Fives* :D



Most teachers do some student teaching during their college years. I don't know what other experience I could get...

Probably get some tutoring gigs?

Catapharact
10-12-09, 06:09
I disagree. I think a Master's these days is a bad investment unless you get an MBA.

Hence why I am investing the time to get one ;). Don't me wrong, my current income is... Significant (QUITE Significant) but I like to climb the ladder even higher.

A bachelors degree focused around arts and social sciences will definately won't get you a 6 figure income ;).

Any bachelor's degree will increase your pay more than a high school diploma. However I agree that just getting a degree is not enough. Work experience and the 4 year degree have to go hand and hand. Which is why 2 internships during Uni is the new norm.

Or the co-op program. Most Universities have internship positions and co-op programs that provide you compensation for the time you put in for training.

AmericanAssassin
10-12-09, 06:09
Probably get some tutoring gigs?

I suppose so. :) My future English professor told me that's how she got into teaching. :D

Quasimodo
10-12-09, 06:14
A bachelors degree focused around arts and social sciences will definately won't get you a 6 figure income ;).

I'll be happy with a five figure one :p

Changeling
10-12-09, 08:35
A bachelors degree focused around arts and social sciences will definately won't get you a 6 figure income ;).

As long as I'm doing something I'm passionate about. :) The arts are about the only thing I have going for me.

tonyme
10-12-09, 09:17
I'm going for an MD. It costs a lot, yes a lot, but it sure isn't a bad investment IMHO. I hope I won't be disappointed when I actually get it, but I don't think this will be the case at all

Draco
10-12-09, 09:47
There are some great rewards for people who earn a degree, but you also have to realize that degree is not what makes you hirable. In fact, it probably works against you most of the time.

If you pursue anything passed Bachelor's, you need to seriously evaluate the viability of the job market you are planning to enter.

I personally dropped my Bachelor Degree aspirations, because it would actually have hurt my ability to be employable ultimately.

You do get paid more for a degree, but you also make yourself less appealing to people who don't need a degree laden employee.

If you do go Masters, you might as well go Doctorate, just be sure it is in something needed.

Squibbly
10-12-09, 11:18
I heard about this, too, although here, it's university that is worth less, and college is more important because it's more hands-on and shows you CAN do the skill you went to school for, instead of having a four-year University degree saying you learned how.

I think it depends more on what you want to do. Sometimes college/university is important to have, sometimes it isn't at all. My college degree is very useful, since the world will never run out of children to teach and care for. There are always jobs in my field.

woody543
10-12-09, 11:39
I'm currently at the stage where I need to start looking for a course to study in university, and its really difficult, especially with my A-level choices; Chemistry, Computing, philosophy and english lang/lit :S

Reggie
10-12-09, 12:21
I think the most important thing about a degree should be whether or not you're going into because you geuinely want to study the given field you're in. I know I'm going to get into a lot of debt but I'm willing to go through it for the sake of doing something I know I've always to do which is to study Japanese. I think the value of a degree is hard to measure and it all comes down to what you want to get out of it. That's the kind of POV entering into a degree with anyway.

scoopy_loopy
10-12-09, 12:26
Oh, whatever. Comment withdrawn.

Dennis's Mom
10-12-09, 14:02
Once upon a time if you had a college degree people would pay you to hang around degrees were so scarce. Now it's almost the new HS diploma.

My son is rattling around a degree in "business" right now, and I shudder. Five years in school so you can manage a Starbucks. :confused: I mention engineering to him every chance I get. I doubt he'll listen.

I agree don't go to school "just because". Going to school later in life is tougher, but it's often more efficient. It's simply too expensive to go to school these days on for a journey of discovery. Gotta have a plan.

If I were to go back to school today, I'd consider a medical program.

irjudd
10-12-09, 14:19
There is certainly such a thing as 'overqualified'. :whi:

Andyroo
10-12-09, 14:22
I agree don't go to school "just because". Going to school later in life is tougher, but it's often more efficient. It's simply too expensive to go to school these days on for a journey of discovery. Gotta have a plan.

So true.

Eddie Haskell
10-12-09, 14:39
The answer is joining the military. I highly recommend it. :)

Sgt BOMBULOUS
10-12-09, 14:47
It depends on what you major in. If you go to Harvard for Art History, you're probably NOT going to get your money's worth. If however you do your homework (no pun intended) and research which majors are paying well, you're more likely to make it a winning venture. I went to Penn State for Chemical Engineering. First, the school isn't insanely expensive, and secondly, I picked a high paying major. In my view people who get expensive liberal arts degrees are just digging themselves into a hole.

The answer is joining the military. I highly recommend it. :)

Agreed, I was in the Army for 4 years before college, allowed me to take things quite a bit more seriously. The GI bill was also extremely helpful.

Melonie Tomb Raider
10-12-09, 15:42
I'm going to be a teacher. A four year degree is exactly what I need. Although, I'm going further and getting my masters. ;)

Same here. I'd probably make quicker and better money studying to be a nurse, x-ray lab technician, or computer programmer - but I want to be doing something I'm at least halfway passionate about:p

I'm considering this route as well. I'd have a lot of fun teaching art. :D

Still up in the air about it, I need to get back in school soon.

Buffy87
10-12-09, 16:16
I guess I can agree with the OP. Some degrees are pretty much a waste of time IMHO, I won't say which ones but some I think wtf??.

That said, I do hold a law degree but seen as I need one in order to become a lawyer, it's not really worthless. It is however true that there are a lack of jobs these days - I am applying for pupillage right now as hopefully I will get called to the bar next year *fingers crossed* and I am finding that the pupillages going are not as wide ranging as they once were. There are less of them - and the field is highly competitive as it is- I have 5 years to get one - as my qualifications will become obsolete so to speak by then and they are more specific than they used to be. I would prefer a general common law pupillage - covering family, criminal etc etc but a lot seem to be very specific these days. :( But I will keep persevering I have wanted this career since I was 14 and I have worked too hard not to do my best to get it.

My sister on the other hand is studying for a degree in Theatre and Dramatic Arts as she hopes to be an actress. Needless to say she may not have a large job offer pool open to her when she gets her degree. But then again, I may not get a job either.

All in all I needed a degree in law to become a lawyer so it was always a given for me that I would go to university. That said it cost me probably around 30 thousand to attend university as an undergraduate and my course this year ( the BVC) has cost me 10 thousand pounds. Sadly, to become a lawyer I need an academic law degree and the vocational "skills based qualification. So I am 40 grand in debt before I have even started work, not out of my own wrongdoing shall we say and I'm currently only 22. So I guess my advice is.. if you want to/have to put yourself in debt make sure it's for a good reason!

aurora89
10-12-09, 16:23
totally disagree... I want to be a nurse practitioner, so I need a Master's degree. :p I plan on working as a nurse after I get my accelerated BSN/MSN (still undecided) but yeah. a BSN makes a lot more money than an RN with just an ADN, in the US and Canada at least!

tonyme
10-12-09, 16:47
It really just depends on what you wanna do.

Reggie
10-12-09, 18:20
In my view people who get expensive liberal arts degrees are just digging themselves into a hole.
I disagree. I think that those who take a liberal arts degree (which includes foreign languages) are getting their money's worth if a - they know exactly what they want to do with that degree after completing it and b - they're going into it because they're genuinely interested in the given field of study. I would actually discourage people from going to uni for purely financial gain (especially in the liberal arts degrees) because work experience or even the military (if that's your thing) will give you a better deal. For me, I know I want to work in Japan and teach or write with Japan as my specialist field of knowledge - I've wanted that for a long time. That's why I disagree.

Mad Tony
10-12-09, 18:23
I disagree. I think that those who take a liberal arts degree (which includes foreign languages) are getting their money's worth if a - they know exactly what they want to do with that degree after completing it and b - they're going into it because they're genuinely interested in the given field of study. I would actually discourage people from going to uni for purely financial gain (especially in the liberal arts degrees) because work experience or even the military (if that's your thing) will give you a better deal. For me, I know I want to work in Japan and teach or write with Japan as my specialist field of knowledge - I've wanted that for a long time. That's why I disagree.I agree. I wanna go into economics and finance and for that you really do need a degree.

Is economics classified as one of the liberal arts though? I'm not sure.

Reggie
10-12-09, 19:24
I agree. I wanna go into economics and finance and for that you really do need a degree.

Is economics classified as one of the liberal arts though? I'm not sure.
The liberal arts account for anything involving arithmatic, social sciences which economics involves so its very much one of those subjects that can be defined under that term. :tmb:

Lavinder
10-12-09, 19:25
The ladder is so complicated :smk:.

Reggie
10-12-09, 19:27
The ladder is so complicated :smk:.

http://www.octopuscluster.co.uk/images/snakes-ladders-game-18246.png

Lavinder
10-12-09, 19:30
http://www.octopuscluster.co.uk/images/snakes-ladders-game-18246.png

Exactly - I always hit the damn snake!

Sgt BOMBULOUS
10-12-09, 19:33
I disagree. I think that those who take a liberal arts degree (which includes foreign languages) are getting their money's worth if a - they know exactly what they want to do with that degree after completing it and b - they're going into it because they're genuinely interested in the given field of study. I would actually discourage people from going to uni for purely financial gain (especially in the liberal arts degrees) because work experience or even the military (if that's your thing) will give you a better deal. For me, I know I want to work in Japan and teach or write with Japan as my specialist field of knowledge - I've wanted that for a long time. That's why I disagree.

Reggie you need to read my post a little more carefully. I said expensive liberal arts degrees. If you go to a community college or a more affordable state school where you're not burying yourself in a mountain of debt, fine, it's not that bad. But if you spend $100,000.00 on a 4 year degree in Japanese, don't expect to ever see that money again. There are exceptions, but in general it's just the way it is.

Reggie
10-12-09, 19:33
Exactly - I always hit the damn snake!
^You never know you may strike it lucky and climb the biggest ladder if the roll the dice just right. :D

Reggie you need to read my post a little more carefully. I said expensive liberal arts degrees. If you go to a community college or a more affordable state school where you're not burying yourself in a mountain of debt, fine, it's not that bad. But if you spend $100,000.00 on a 4 year degree in Japanese, don't expect to ever see that money again. There are exceptions, but in general it's just the way it is.
Ah but pretty much all degrees are expensive here, especially for me because I admit I'm not well off and the only unis that offer Japanese are hundreds of miles away so its unavoidable. For me, a large amount of debt at the end of my degree is a given. I just have work around that as best I can so I can do what I've set out to do with as little amount of debt as possible (living on a budget, having part time work...). With tuition fees and accommadation costs and all the rest, it just mounts up.

Sgt BOMBULOUS
10-12-09, 19:40
^You never know you may strike it lucky and climb the biggest ladder if the roll the dice just right. :D


Ah but pretty much all degrees are expensive here, especially for me because I admit I'm not well off and the only unis that offer Japanese are hundreds of miles away so its unavoidable. For me, a large amount of debt at the end of my degree is a given. I just have work around that as best I can so I can do what I've set out to do with as little amount of debt as possible. With tuition fees and accommadation costs, it just mounts up.

If you want to learn Japanese, you should find an outfit that is looking for English instructors in Japan. You'll learn it far faster there than you ever will in college. I might add a little to this: I was a Korean Linguist in the Army. Meaning, the US Army taught me Korean, and then I spent a year on Korea. Once I got there though, I was shocked to see that there were TONS of US civilians there to teach English, and many of them didn't know a spec of Korean. BUT, with time there that can all change.

EmeraldFields
10-12-09, 19:41
There are bunch of wannabe teachers on TRF!:D

For a long time I wanted to be a history teacher, but now I'm thinking about going into historic preservation. It's something that I'm very interested in.

irjudd
10-12-09, 19:43
I'll teach you a thing or two.

EmeraldFields
10-12-09, 19:45
I'll teach you a thing or two.

http://i48.************/2nl9rhl.gif


Well, I'm all ears.:D

Reggie
10-12-09, 19:49
If you want to learn Japanese, you should find an outfit that is looking for English instructors in Japan. You'll learn it far faster there than you ever will in college. I might add a little to this: I was a Korean Linguist in the Army. Meaning, the US Army taught me Korean, and then I spent a year on Korea. Once I got there though, I was shocked to see that there were TONS of US civilians there to teach English, and many of them didn't know a spec of Korean. BUT, with time there that can all change.
During the third or second year of the Japanese degrees I've applied for, I get to spend a whole year in the country getting work experience (or going to a Japanese university) - getting the necessary time there to really pick up on the language. Also, the whole of idea of reading loads of books, doing lots of research/studying and gearing all that towards my favourite subject (Japanese and Japan itself) is worth a lot itself. This is starting to sound like my personal statement! :vlol:
I appreciate what you're saying though. My parents have been through this with me in a similar way (because they want to make sure I'm doing something worthwhile for what its going to cost) and they understand why I'm doing what I'm doing. I just have to make sure I get the best result I can and enjoy it as much as possible if its going to cost so much.

Catapharact
10-12-09, 20:24
As long as I'm doing something I'm passionate about. :) The arts are about the only thing I have going for me.

Which is perfectly fine with me so long as you know the possibe limitations of the degree you are investing your time in. If its what you want to do and you know that your chances of succeeding in that given field are good, then by all means go right ahead and take the course. I just don't want you turning into a rioting idiot demanding that I equally distrubute my earned cash amoung those who chose to get into a cheap liberal arts career like dancing, failed to succeed in it, and then starts blaming the "rich" for putting him/her in that situation.

Those people make me want to take the police foundation course, sign up with the riot police and show them a thing or two about "police brutality."

Melonie Tomb Raider
10-12-09, 21:36
Which is perfectly fine with me so long as you know the possibe limitations of the degree you are investing your time in. If its what you want to do and you know that your chances of succeeding in that given field are good, then by all means go right ahead and take the course. I just don't want you turning into a rioting idiot demanding that I equally distrubute my earned cash amoung those who chose to get into a cheap liberal arts career like dancing, failed to succeed in it, and then starts blaming the "rich" for putting him/her in that situation.

Those people make me want to take the police foundation course, sign up with the riot police and show them a thing or two about "police brutality."

Oh gosh, I hate it when people hate on the rich and expect them to distribute their money, it's just sickening.

Though I'm pretty sure most of the people who want that are on welfare anyway, rather than being college educated.

I think ultimately, it's important to do something you will be content and happy doing. As long as you can make enough to support yourself and have a happy life with, that's what matters. Sure, most of us would like to make a whole bunch of money, but if we have to choose between that and having a job that makes you happy, I'd choose the happy job any day. Right now I'm at a bank, and if I stayed here and moved up, I could potentially make a whole lot of money. However, I'm not passionate about the banking industry. I looooove my job, don't get me wrong, but my true passion is art, and that is what I want for my future. You never know, there are always opportunities in the media with art, and that will land you big bucks. Other than that, you can at the very least support yourself and live happy. That's what I want. :)

However, having both a job you adore and making a bunch of money out of it is ideal, of course. :p

Dustie
10-12-09, 23:01
Taking the collage -> university degree route seems like a fine idea. You get the skill in a considerably short time, you get a job, and then you can continue your education while gaining actual experience at work, so it's like, the two fused together.


Depends on where you live and what your situation is, though. Plus the general situation in world economy and how it reflects on the job market...


I myself just started a 2-years film college, and I want to get a decent job that fits with both what I want to do in life and the skills I'm scoring right now. Once I finish college and get a job, I will see what perspectives there are for further education.

Solice
11-12-09, 04:04
I have an Associates Degree in Information Technology, but I definitely feel like I need to continue my education and get a Bachelors degree. Of course you need hands on training, but it's a known fact that people with degrees get paid significantly more than people without them. Just the same, people with Bachelors degrees get paid a lot more than people with Associates degrees. I'm very proud of the degree I have, but I don't really get any raised eyebrows for it on my applications, because it's just an Associates.

Ideally, one would have both training and a four year (or more :p) degree. I would stress that more than simply one or the other.

I am a software developer, so I can relate to you. I do encourage you to get the four year degree, but also keep working in IT and build your resume.

I have worked with some people with a Masters degree in computer science who had no idea how to develop software in the 'real world'. Those of us with experience run circles around Academics. Keep one foot in school and one in the workplace and you can't lose.

takamotosan
11-12-09, 04:11
I think the problem is that people wanna major in things that are extremely vague and don't hold a lot of merit.

aktrekker
11-12-09, 06:23
I have worked with some people with a Masters degree in computer science who had no idea how to develop software in the 'real world'. Those of us with experience run circles around Academics. Keep one foot in school and one in the workplace and you can't lose.

I've found the same to be true of those with a Bachelor's degree. Unfortunately, experience doesn't count as much as it used to. But employers still want experience. It's like a catch-22 inside of a catch-22.

Lavinder
11-12-09, 11:28
I hate the fact that everyone is frowning upon me because I'm not going to university. I'm going to do an apprenticeship in health and social next year to get me on the route of becoming a midwife. I will get experience, plus I will get paid to work, which is what I need because I'm moving out and need to pay board.

Another plus is if I get enough experience in my job, they may consider putting me on to an 18 month course within the workplace to register as a full midwife.

Ward Dragon
12-12-09, 00:33
I've found the same to be true of those with a Bachelor's degree. Unfortunately, experience doesn't count as much as it used to. But employers still want experience. It's like a catch-22 inside of a catch-22.

Yeah, I hate that. When I graduated from my university I started looking for jobs and nobody would hire me because I had no experience. I ended up being a substitute secretary for awhile, and I only got that position because my mother works for the school district. The school liked me so much that they wanted to hire me, but the state refused to let me take the required aptitude test due to lack of experience, so I went back to school to try to become a teacher. I just finished my semester of student teaching today and it was a really draining experience. I don't really want to be a teacher anymore. I'm going to try to get an entry-level job editing books instead since that seems more my style. If that fails, I suppose I can try to get a teaching job in a private school where the really vicious kids can get kicked out (as opposed to the public school which was a zoo that I couldn't control).

Mad Tony
12-12-09, 00:42
Do your chances of finding a good job upon graduating depend on the degree you get?

larafan25
12-12-09, 00:43
Not saying that you guys are wrong, but this goes against everything everyone has ever told me during my time in school.:p

I feel the same:p

what if I go to university or college and learn, then go do some work for experience...and then enter a carrier??:)

Lemmie
12-12-09, 00:51
Do your chances of finding a good job upon graduating depend on the degree you get?

Yes, and often the university you graduate from plays a big part.

Most of the new universities (at least in the UK) are really good on one or two specific subject areas, while the older and more established ones have a broader subject base.

Therefore, a degree in Chemical Engineering from De Montfort University will be worth less compared to one from say, the University of Manchester or UCL.

Mad Tony
12-12-09, 00:52
Yes, and often the university you graduate from plays a big part.

Most of the new universities (at least in the UK) are really good on one or two specific subject areas, while the older and more established ones have a broader subject base.

Therefore, a degree in Chemical Engineering from De Montfort University will be worth less compared to one from say, the University of Manchester or UCL.Hmm, that makes sense. The university I wanna study at is one of the best in the country for economics, although it's not considered one of the very best overall (still pretty good though, something like 39th out of 120). Would this be beneficial to me?

miss.haggard
12-12-09, 01:15
I feel the same:p

what if I go to university or college and learn, then go do some work for experience...and then enter a carrier??:)

And what if you $60,000 in debt and dont get a job?

What then? There are too many "what ifs."

My advice to high schoolers - Think, sit down and really THINK about what is best for you. Dont follow the crowd and go to college because that is what is expected of you. There are plenty of well paying jobs you can get without a college degree.

EmeraldFields
12-12-09, 01:16
And what if you $60,000 in debt and dont get a job?

What then?

Burger King is always hiring!:D

miss.haggard
12-12-09, 01:19
Burger King is always hiring!:D

:rolleyes: Have you ever tried living on $7.25 an hour? Let alone take care of a family and pay off debt?

Punaxe
12-12-09, 01:23
And what if you $60,000 in debt and dont get a job?

What then? There are too many "what ifs."

My advice to high schoolers - Think, sit down and really THINK about what is best for you. Dont follow the crowd and go to college because that is what is expected of you. There are plenty of well paying jobs you can get without a college degree.

Yeah, that debt is a huge problem overthere in the US and Canada. Here, students can get up to EUR 16.000,- depending on the course they follow, which will be turned into a gift rather than a loan provided that the student graduates within 10 years. Anything more than that will need to be borrowed, but higher education here is way cheaper than in the US/Canada - but still more expensive than in other parts of Europe, e.g. in Finland it's entirely free.
I think it is a worrying situation if students need to put themselves into such a debt. Luckily, this is not the case here. There are no prohibiting "what ifs"; the only question that counts is basically "would you like to?" - and that's how it should be.

LaraLuvrrr
12-12-09, 01:28
And what if you $60,000 in debt and dont get a job?

What then? There are too many "what ifs."

My advice to high schoolers - Think, sit down and really THINK about what is best for you. Dont follow the crowd and go to college because that is what is expected of you. There are plenty of well paying jobs you can get without a college degree.

In my case my 4 year degree was paid for by scholarships. But if a student has to pay their whole way through I do think they should take time to figure out what they want to do since they are paying for the degree. And if you can time your graduation with a positive economic cycle than even better cuz you have a better chance of finding a job lol

miss.haggard
12-12-09, 01:29
Yeah, that debt is a huge problem overthere in the US and Canada. Here, students can get up to EUR 16.000,- depending on the course they follow, which will be turned into a gift rather than a loan provided that the student graduates within 10 years. Anything more than that will need to be borrowed, but higher education here is way cheaper than in the US/Canada - but still more expensive than in other parts of Europe, e.g. in Finland it's entirely free.
I think it is a worrying situation if students need to put themselves into such a debt. Luckily, this is not the case here. There are no prohibiting "what ifs"; the only question that counts is basically "would you like to?" - and that's how it should be.

Thats ideal, and almost sounds too good to be true from my point of view. You guys are lucky. Its alot of money to go to school, and when it turns out that they cant get a job/cant get a job in their field of study, people act all "WTF, I went to college..."

But thats the thing I worry about the most is, kids think just because they go to school they are guaranteed a good job, and that thats the only way it can happen. Well, what Im trying to say is that you dont have to go to school. You really really dont have to.

Get a few jobs, take a few years off, think about what you want to do and then go back to school is my advice.

EmeraldFields
12-12-09, 01:31
:rolleyes: Have you ever tried living on $7.25 an hour? Let alone take care of a family and pay off debt?

It's called sarcasm.

miss.haggard
12-12-09, 01:32
It's called sarcasm.

Its called ditto, chill pill. Take one.

EmeraldFields
12-12-09, 01:34
Its called ditto, chill pill. Take one.

LOL! The ":rolleyes:" is always deceiving.

miss.haggard
12-12-09, 01:35
I know! Let me just put ... :wve: ... and now everything I say will be taken in a *****y manner!

Punaxe
12-12-09, 01:44
Thats ideal, and almost sounds too good to be true from my point of view. You guys are lucky. Its alot of money to go to school, and when it turns out that they cant get a job/cant get a job in their field of study, people act all "WTF, I went to college..."

But thats the thing I worry about the most is, kids think just because they go to school they are guaranteed a good job, and that thats the only way it can happen. Well, what Im trying to say is that you dont have to go to school. You really really dont have to.

Get a few jobs, take a few years off, think about what you want to do and then go back to school is my advice.

Yes, if you know that you will end up with a debt, you need to be sure that what you're going to do is worth it, and that you won't change your mind a few years in (as many do, including me - the age of 18 seems to be too young to make a proper decision regarding the future). However, a few years worth of extra time does not guarantee making the right decision.

About job availability though, as far as I know, that too is very different here. Overhere, a diploma will always increase your chances on the (relevant) market, with the exception of for example artistic fields where output obviously counts more than education. No, you don't need to have tertiary education, but at least overhere, it's definitely going to help.

Solice
12-12-09, 07:58
Hmm, that makes sense. The university I wanna study at is one of the best in the country for economics, although it's not considered one of the very best overall (still pretty good though, something like 39th out of 120). Would this be beneficial to me?

From what I know about Economics, at least in the US, where you go to school is very important. And economists almost always have advanced degrees. You should add accounting or finance to your major to get your foot into the door.

Do your chances of finding a good job upon graduating depend on the degree you get?

Yes, a degree in Engineering will get you more offers and money than most any other degree as the BS level.

rickybazire
12-12-09, 09:00
I'm (hopefully) going to be doing a four year course in Audiology. I really like the subject as I've got first hand experience in it. I'd rather do that than go in a job straightaway after finishing college.

Dark Lugia 2
12-12-09, 14:26
I only have a vague idea of what I want to do in the future, and thats 'science related' or 'biochemist' :/ Gotta look into university more...

Lemmie
12-12-09, 14:34
Hmm, that makes sense. The university I wanna study at is one of the best in the country for economics, although it's not considered one of the very best overall (still pretty good though, something like 39th out of 120). Would this be beneficial to me?

Yeah, overall I would say that if you study at a university that has a good reputation for economics or business studies, your degree is going to be worth more to employers than a similar economics degree from a university that doesn't have the same reputation.