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gonga
16-10-03, 00:44
I'm trying free open source software, and I'm wondering if anyone else has experience with it to share. I'm not interested in Linux input personally, because I'm not ready to make that leap yet. But...

I'm currently using Mozilla 1.5 for browsing and e-mail. I haven't tried the chat yet. It's working great and of course it's free.

I plan on installing OpenOffice soon. Has anybody tried it out?

John Falstaff
16-10-03, 00:49
Hi Gonga,

http://www.tombraiderforums.com/images/smilies/wave.gif

I recognise the avatar - but you appear to be posting in double dutch! When did you learn that then?

;)

tazmine
16-10-03, 00:51
Originally posted by John Falstaff:
Hi Gonga,

http://www.tombraiderforums.com/images/smilies/wave.gif

I recognise the avatar - but you appear to be posting in double dutch! When did you learn that then?

;) :D

max_payne_99
16-10-03, 01:41
Originally posted by gonga:
I'm trying free open source software, and I'm wondering if anyone else has experience with it to share. I'm not interested in Linux input personally, because I'm not ready to make that leap yet. But...

I'm currently using Mozilla 1.5 for browsing and e-mail. I haven't tried the chat yet. It's working great and of course it's free.

I plan on installing OpenOffice soon. Has anybody tried it out?I haven't tried OpenOffice yet, but I have heard good things. ;)

Annacia
16-10-03, 01:56
Gonga, I haven't forgotten I just haven't gotten to the market yet!

Draco
16-10-03, 02:02
I have OpenOffice 1.1 installed...

It wants you to have Java installed, but isnt required...

I haven't had any issues with it...

jitte
16-10-03, 09:34
If you're looking for a browser that doesn't have everything but the kitchen sink included try Mozilla Firebird, formerly Phoenix.

No email client, chat, or editor included, just a nice quick browser with lots of skins, and it's free.

gonga
16-10-03, 09:57
Originally posted by John Falstaff:
Hi Gonga,

http://www.tombraiderforums.com/images/smilies/wave.gif

I recognise the avatar - but you appear to be posting in double dutch! When did you learn that then?

;) Now John, you know I'm no master of linguistics! I couldn't even learn ig-pay atin-lay!

"Open Source" programs are free and the code is open to the public domain. If you are among those having security issues with Internet Explorer and Outlook Express, Mozilla could be an easy fix! Although we're securely behind a router and software firewall here, I like Mozilla's features. I also wouldn't mind weaning myself away from monopolistic Micro$oft products. I'm trying Mozilla 1.5 so I'm setting up the e-mail now. Importing all my browser favorites, addresses, mail and accounts was a breeze.

Thanks to all the posters on this thread http://www.tombraiderforums.com/images/smilies/smile.gif

[ 16. October 2003, 10:59: Message edited by: gonga ]

gonga
18-10-03, 21:36
Very impressed with OpenOffice. The text application can read and write to Word, Acrobat pdf or html. And it acts like publisher - very easy to create rich graphic pages. I already wrote a couple of desktop publishing-style pages in my book with tons of graphics and saved to html and pdf. It replaces $900 worth of software for me (Office and Acrobat).

John Falstaff
18-10-03, 21:42
Sorry Gonga,

But what's a 'router' and how does it help?

RSVP in very short words!

(By the way, are you not well? Is it weast Nile fever?)

http://www.tombraiderforums.com/images/smilies/privateeye.gif

gonga
18-10-03, 22:29
Just a nasty cold really. But I'm miserable nonetheless!

A router is a hardware device that computers on a network use to connect to each other and collectively, to a server, or in my case, a cable modem for Internet service. The router allows the computers to "see" each other - share files and so on. Also, we can all share access to the Internet through the cable modem. It's like fast hub.

One of the big disadvantages of cable Internet service is that it's always on and your computer is always vulnerable. A router protects all the computers hooked into it from being detected across the Internet. All an intruder sees is the IP address of the router - not the computers. So intruders can't get past the router. If you add a software firewall on the computers with pop up blocking, etc., you have a veritable fortress. We use Norton Internet Security and have never had a problem.

John Falstaff
18-10-03, 23:08
Thanks Gonga!

(I'll get my step mother to translate!)

;)