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View Full Version : What materiels are Chinese/Japanese?


TRhalloween
02-01-10, 22:12
I'm doing a project right now and I'm wondering what materiels are considered Chinese and Japanese. I have silk so far, which I consider to be Chinese. Fabrics, pretty much which would be considered traditional (like tartan is to Scotland).
Please don't just Google it. If anyone already knows, I would greatly appreciate you sharing it with me :)

Draco
02-01-10, 22:14
Gunpowder

TRhalloween
02-01-10, 22:17
Ehh ... I don't think they're going to allow that.

tombraiderluka
02-01-10, 22:18
I just know about silk, could cotton be there? I mean, it's grown everywhere.

Draco
02-01-10, 22:18
Why not? Are you looking for specific materials then?

Aranara
02-01-10, 22:18
Firecrackers are chinese:)
Hope it helps:tmb:

Love2Raid
02-01-10, 22:19
Jade! :D

Edit: Oh, you were talking about fabrics. :o

Minty Mouth
02-01-10, 22:20
Isn't tartan more of a pattern than a fabric?

TRhalloween
02-01-10, 22:20
Why not? Are you looking for specific materials then?

I meant fabrics.

@Minty: Tartan is the fabric, plaid is the pattern, I'm sure.

Quasimodo
02-01-10, 22:20
Firecrackers are chinese:)
Hope it helps:tmb:

Those contain gunpowder too, don't they?

Minty Mouth
02-01-10, 22:21
I meant fabrics.

@Minty: Tartan is the fabric, plaid is the pattern, I'm sure.

Oh, yeah this could be the case *google*

Reggie
02-01-10, 22:22
Washi or Wagami (和紙? (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Help:Installing_Japanese_character_sets)) is a type of paper (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paper) made in Japan (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japan). Washi is commonly made using fibers from the bark of the gampi (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Gampi&action=edit&redlink=1) tree, the mitsumata (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Mitsumata&action=edit&redlink=1) shrub (Edgeworthia papyrifera), or the paper mulberry (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paper_mulberry), but also can be made using bamboo (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bamboo), hemp (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hemp), rice (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rice), and wheat (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wheat). Washi comes from wa meaning Japanese and shi meaning paper, and the term is used to describe paper made by hand in the traditional manner.
[link] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Washi)

http://www.virtualginza.com/gif/kozo-shi2.jpg

It comes in all kinds of patterns and colours. :)

TRhalloween
02-01-10, 22:27
[link] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Washi)

[IMG]http://www.virtualginza.com/gif/kozo-shi2.jpg[/IMG

It comes in all kinds of patterns and colours. :)

That looks interesting, I'll look out for it. Thanks :tmb:

@Luke: Well I'm using wool for Scotland :)

I guess it doesn't specifically have to be from the country. Just something that be effective as a representative for the country. As long as it doesn' look really out of place. Thanks for your help, people :)

marla_biggs
02-01-10, 22:30
Tatami mats?

Minty Mouth
02-01-10, 22:33
On closer inspection, it seems "plaid" is just an Americanism. Tartan is the pattern weaved into the cloth, not the material its self.

TRhalloween
02-01-10, 22:37
On closer inspection, it seems "plaid" is just an Americanism. Tartan is the pattern weaved into the cloth, not the material its self.

oh ... sucks for me then :/
I'll have to just think of a materiel which is appropriate.

tombraiderluka
02-01-10, 22:38
good luckwith whatever you are doing! ♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥ ♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥ ♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥ ♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥ ♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥ ♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥ ♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥ ♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥

Minty Mouth
02-01-10, 22:38
oh ... sucks for me then :/
I'll have to just think of a materiel which is appropriate.

"Tartan is also known as plaid in North America, but in Scotland, a plaid is a tartan cloth slung over the shoulder or a blanket."

Admittedly, this is only from Wikipedia, but I imagine it to be true.