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Catracoth
23-05-10, 17:00
Upon logging onto my homepage, I saw an interesting article about where the phrase originated. The link brought me to a Yahoo! Answers page:

http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20100424202531AAk6ilr

“Liar, liar, pants on fire. Hangin’ on a telephone wire!” is a paraphrased version of the 1810 poem “The Liar” by William Blake.

Deceiver, dissembler
Your trousers are alight
From what pole or gallows
Shall they dangle in the night?

When I asked of your career
Why did you have to kick my rear
With that stinking lie of thine
Proclaiming that you owned a mine?

When you asked to borrow my stallion
To visit a nearby-moored galleon
How could I ever know that you
Intended only to turn him into glue?

What red devil of mendacity
Grips your soul with such tenacity?
Will one you cruelly shower with lies
Put a pistol ball between your eyes?

What infernal serpent
Has lent you his forked tongue?
From what pit of foul deceit
Are all these whoppers sprung?

Deceiver, dissembler
Your trousers are alight
From what pole or gallows
Do they dangle in the night?

MangelinaJolie
23-05-10, 17:01
William Blake is my favorite poet and I didn't even know this. Shame on me. :o

Minty Mouth
23-05-10, 17:02
And so, 'Your trousers are alight' enters my reportoire.

Thanks for sharing, I wasn't aware of this. Nice to see the word 'Whoppers' in there :p

TRhalloween
23-05-10, 17:03
That poem is pretty funny :D

Alive_and_Funky
23-05-10, 17:06
I remember that poem from yeeeeaaaaaarrrrrrrrrsssssssss ago (around ten or so, maybe?). I had kinda forgotten about it though.

Catracoth
23-05-10, 17:07
William Blake is my favorite poet and I didn't even know this. Shame on me. :o

Speaking of coincidence, we were just studying Blake in my English class last week.

igonge
23-05-10, 20:15
Deceiver, dissembler
Your trousers are alight

*takes a note*

Thanks for sharing! :tmb:

Mytly
23-05-10, 20:27
Sorry, but this sounds completely unlikely to me. :rolleyes: That poem does not sound like anything Blake has written and nor is it in 18th century English, and a quick Google search shows that its main source seems to be Uncyclopedia - not exactly a trustworthy source, to say the least. :p

Apathetic
23-05-10, 20:34
He's the guy who created that one Poem that Lara said in the first Tomb Raider movie.

"To see a world in a grain of sand, And a heaven in a wild flower, Hold infinity in the palm of your hand, And eternity in an hour." --

Tombraiderx08
23-05-10, 20:43
Pretty nice poem, thanks for sharing! :tmb:

Catracoth
23-05-10, 21:21
Sorry, but this sounds completely unlikely to me. :rolleyes: That poem does not sound like anything Blake has written and nor is it in 18th century English, and a quick Google search shows that its main source seems to be Uncyclopedia - not exactly a trustworthy source, to say the least. :p

You make an interesting statement, Mytly, but don't forget, it was written in 1810, seventeen years before Blake died - his writing could have changed. It looks like 18th century writing to me...and perhaps the poem was obscure or unpublished, hence the difficulty of finding a reputable source.

Mytly
23-05-10, 22:07
Sorry, but that is simply not late 18th/early 19th century English, and simply not Blake's style either. 'Whoppers'?! 'Kick my rear'?!!! That's 20th/21st century American English or I'll eat my hat. And not to mention that from all I have read of Blake's poems (I studied them in college, btw), he had not a tiniest shred of a sense of humour. ;) This poem is most certainly not written by him.

Chocola teapot
23-05-10, 22:09
How intriguing.

Laralissa
23-05-10, 22:10
Im afraid Im with Mytly on this one... its quite clearly a joke - Uncyclopaedia is a huge ****-take. Such an awesome site for a laugh though :D

Johnnay
23-05-10, 22:13
Sorry, but this sounds completely unlikely to me. :rolleyes: That poem does not sound like anything Blake has written and nor is it in 18th century English, and a quick Google search shows that its main source seems to be Uncyclopedia - not exactly a trustworthy source, to say the least. :p

isnt Uncyclopedia just random garbage people like to put up about stuff hence the name

Catracoth
23-05-10, 22:17
Hmm...intriguing indeed...not to mention now that I give it another look, the person who answered the Yahoo! Answers question didn't even cite their source.