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Solice
12-10-10, 02:34
English is the most diverse language on Earth. So what are some of the differences? You may include any English speaking country when drawing your comparisons, Australia, New Zealand and so on.

Four door car:
USA: Sedan England: Saloon

Thingie that covers a car engine:
USA:Hood England: Bonnet

Storage area in the back of a car:
USA:Trunk England:Boot

Bar:
USA: Saloon England:Pub

leglion
12-10-10, 02:38
I hate the difference in spelling! >.< do you know they take points off a test for British spelling? :hea:

thecentaur
12-10-10, 02:38
There are spelling nuances

-or in America (color)
-our in UK (colour)

-ize in America (stylize)
-ise in UK (stylise)

Pardon if the above examples are not accurate. I'm from the US so I don't know all the different conventions between UK and US :o

TheBloodRed
12-10-10, 02:46
The England English accent is a lot newer than the American one.

The "American" type of generic accent was actually the way people spoke back in the day in England. The English settlers continued to speak that way here in the Americas while England had a change of dialect.

Just some quick trivia! :wve:

voltz
12-10-10, 02:49
To americans, most british sound like they're drunk. Not to sound stereotypical, but I've heard more then my share.

Phlip
12-10-10, 02:52
US: Elevator
UK: Lift

US: Movie
UK: Film

TheBloodRed
12-10-10, 02:52
To americans, most british sound like they're drunk. Not to sound stereotypical, but I've heard more then my share.

Naw man, that's the Irish. :ton:
--

US: Shoping Cart
UK: Trolly

Evan C.
12-10-10, 02:53
I LOVE british accent, I really do.

Tombraiderx08
12-10-10, 03:03
We definitely dont say saloon :p, we say bar, lol. Maybe in the western states maybe but, not where I'm from.

SkyPuppy
12-10-10, 03:04
i also love British accents, but when i'm talking to my friends, it's sometimes hard to understand what they're saying, and it results to me feeling bad about it. >_<

robm_2007
12-10-10, 03:05
British ppl sound smart when they speak, even if its nonsense.
----------------------
UK: Banger in the mouth
US: Sausage in the mouth

does anyone get the reference? :p

CerebralAssassin
12-10-10, 03:14
tbh I don't like English accents,but I like Irish ones:p

UK: phone,ring
US:call

Agent 47
12-10-10, 03:36
To americans, most british sound like they're drunk. Not to sound stereotypical, but I've heard more then my share.

tbh I don't like English accents,but I like Irish ones:p


Oh dear, and with that it becomes us vs them. :vlol:

British ppl sound smart when they speak, even if its nonsense.


Bah! that's just money talking and the posh folks born with silver spoons in their stuck up little lar di dar manor. (sucking plums is how we common folk call them)

Aristocracy, a pain in Britain's arse since 1066,we killed a king once,shame it didn't last :D

ozzman
12-10-10, 03:37
i heard a Ginger is NOT a Spicey Root in UK language, i heard it means something totaly different

scoopy_loopy
12-10-10, 03:40
Thank God for 'English (UK)'. The American usage of "z" and "er" instead of "re" drives me nuts. :tea:

EmeraldFields
12-10-10, 03:42
Someone's got to give the "z" some love! It's barely used. :(

Agent 47
12-10-10, 03:42
i heard a Ginger is NOT a Spicey Root in UK language, i heard it means something totaly different

Say what! :vlol: are you referring to red haired people? As far as i know Ginger is indeed a spicy product :D

Thank God for 'English (UK)'. The American usage of "z" and "er" instead of "re" drives me nuts. :tea:

Yay someone likes us :hug: :vlol:

Lizard of Oz
12-10-10, 03:45
I love British accents! I find them erotic if you speak slowly, it also makes everyone sound smarter for some reason LOL :D

Sir Croft
12-10-10, 03:45
#555555
US: Gray
UK: Grey

leglion
12-10-10, 03:46
#555555
US: Gray
UK: Grey

say what? :confused:

Ikas90
12-10-10, 03:46
British English is better. :whi:

Someone once pointed out to me that I spelt something wrong, where I used "s" instead of "z", and I was like, "No, that's American". :vlol:

scoopy_loopy
12-10-10, 03:48
I find it just insulting when foreign students learn the American way. ITS NOT PROPER! :mad: :p

QiX
12-10-10, 03:50
US: donut
UK: doughnut

US: color
UK: colour

US: honor
UK: honour

US: armor
UK: armour

US: soccer
The whole planet except US: football

leglion
12-10-10, 03:51
I find it just insulting when foreign students learn the American way. ITS NOT PROPER! :mad: :p

They tried to make me spell stuff the American way but... it's never gonna happen I tell you! it's not proper! :hea:

Sir Croft
12-10-10, 03:53
I find it just insulting when foreign students learn the American way. ITS NOT PROPER! :mad: :p

I learned the it American way! :vlol:

leglion
12-10-10, 03:54
I learned it the American way! :vlol:

you let them do it to you? :yik:

EmeraldFields
12-10-10, 03:55
I learned it the American way! :vlol:

The correct way! :D

Lizard of Oz
12-10-10, 04:01
Can anyone give me an example of the "Z" and "S" thing? :)
LOL

TRexbait
12-10-10, 04:02
US: donut
UK: doughnut

[QUOTE=Sir Croft] #555555
US: Gray
UK: Grey

Really!? I've been spelling it "doghnut" and "gray" for a while now. And I find myself sometimes using the UK version of the following

UK: "ou"
US: "o"

Example. Colour, color

^ Also, I think the s and Z thing is Realize and Realise... maybe.

EmeraldFields
12-10-10, 04:04
Can anyone give me an example of the "Z" and "S" thing? :)
LOL

US: Socialize
UK: Socialise

:p

QiX
12-10-10, 04:05
Can anyone give me an example of the "Z" and "S" thing? :)
LOL

Capitalise/capitalize, militarise/militarize, the same goes with words ending in -isation/-ization.

TRexbait
12-10-10, 04:14
The "s"'s just look weird to me. All the other differences of in spelling seem phonetically correct, then comes the "s"'s and it now reads (to me) "realice", "capitalice", "socialice" and "militarice"

EmeraldFields
12-10-10, 04:14
Apparently, according to the Oxford Dictionary both -ize and -ise endings are correct in British English.

Many verbs that end in -ize can also end in -ise: both endings are correct in British English, though you should stick to one or the other within a piece of writing. For example: finalize/finalise; organize/organise; realize/realise. This website spells these words with the -ize ending, but the main dictionary entries for the verbs show that the -ise spelling is also correct.

http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/page/spellingizeiseyse?view=uk

I didn't know that! :D

Agent 47
12-10-10, 04:17
I find it just insulting when foreign students learn the American way. ITS NOT PROPER! :mad: :p

Are you a Brit trapped in a foreign body :D

I know right! and to think we colonised (that's colonise with an "s" folks)half the globe :vlol:

domina
12-10-10, 04:39
The "s"'s just look weird to me. All the other differences of in spelling seem phonetically correct, then comes the "s"'s and it now reads (to me) "realice", "capitalice", "socialice" and "militarice"

Neat little tidbit, actually: Many of the spellings in American English were altered and suggested by Noah Webster as a means to make them simple and more phonetically accurate. I think he initially left the "u" in words like color, but later dropped them.

freeze10108
12-10-10, 04:45
US: Fanny pack
UK: Bum bag ("fanny" is very bad in the UK, I hear)

Punctuation wise: in the US all periods and commas after something quoted must be inside the quotation marks.
Ex. (US): I like the songs "Just Dance," "Poker Face," and "Bad Romance."
Ex. (UK): I like the songs "Just Dance", "Poker Face", and "Bad Romance".
I think that rules regarding dialog remain the same though... :pi:

This is due to some weird thing with typewriters and publishing and it being difficult to discern whether or not the marks were there, though many of the details escape me.

Also, in the US, we're supposed to add two hard spaces after a punctuation mark signifying the end of a sentence, and I believe that it's only one in the UK (though I'm not entirely sure).

Other things:

While in the US we're supposed to say (or spell, as it were) "premier" and "dialog," we very, very often use the UK spellings "premiere" and "dialogue."

Also, the "our", as in "colour," makes me want to say it like "culoor" instead of "culler." :p

I find it just insulting when foreign students learn the American way. ITS NOT PROPER! :mad: :p

:( -> http://imgur.com/alJmz.jpg -> http://imgur.com/etC3B.gif -> :) -> :D

domina
12-10-10, 04:48
Also, in the US, we're supposed to add two hard spaces after a punctuation mark signifying the end of a sentence, and I believe that it's only one in the UK (though I'm not entirely sure).


Sorta. It's become standard now to teach students to put two spaces after a punctuation mark, but it's not incorrect to only use one.

ozzman
12-10-10, 04:50
Say what! :vlol: are you referring to red haired people? As far as i know Ginger is indeed a spicy product :D



Yay someone likes us :hug: :vlol:

rob zombie missled me then

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IHjc1XmRnOM&feature=related

freeze10108
12-10-10, 05:02
Sorta. It's become standard now to teach students to put two spaces after a punctuation mark, but it's not incorrect to only use one.

Well, yes. What's being taught as the norm now is what I would consider to be more proper, but feel free to disagree. ;)

domina
12-10-10, 05:16
Well, yes. What's being taught as the norm now is what I would consider to be more proper, but feel free to disagree. ;)

Okay. :) I tend to go with what the MLA handbook (http://www.mla.org/style_faq3) says, and it essentially says either is okay, unless one is specified for whatever reason.

I actually looked up some information on it because I thought it was a newer practice, but it turns out that also goes back to the days of typewriters (as you mentioned with the other punctuation practices) and it's starting to be phased out since fonts on computer are proportionally spaced. Interestingly, I remember people getting frustrated with Dreamweaver since it wouldn't let you put two spaces after a punctuation mark--Guess that's why.

Sir Croft
12-10-10, 05:17
Apparently, according to the Oxford Dictionary both -ize and -ise endings are correct in British English.



http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/page/spellingizeiseyse?view=uk

I didn't know that! :D

-ise is just way too weird to me, so I always use -ize.

Melonie Tomb Raider
12-10-10, 05:23
Bar:
USA: Saloon England:Pub

Do people in the US really call bars Saloons nowadays? I know they did during the cowboy days, but as an American in this day in age, I can't say I've ever heard it called a Saloon other than in reference to cowboys.

People around here just call it a bar :p

I find it just insulting when foreign students learn the American way. ITS NOT PROPER! :mad: :p

Don't you mean "It's"? :ton: :mis: :hug:

SkyPuppy
12-10-10, 05:27
Do people in the US really call bars Saloons nowadays? I know they did during the cowboy days, but as an American in this day in age, I can't say I've ever heard it called a Saloon other than in reference to cowboys.

People around here just call it a bar :p

i've actually never heard it called "saloon", either... strange.

Melonie Tomb Raider
12-10-10, 05:29
i've actually never heard it called "saloon", either... strange.

lol yeah. Truth be told, if someone seriously called it a saloon I'd probably laugh. :vlol:

freeze10108
12-10-10, 05:45
I actually looked up some information on it because I thought it was a newer practice, but it turns out that also goes back to the days of typewriters (as you mentioned with the other punctuation practices) and it's starting to be phased out since fonts on computer are proportionally spaced. Interestingly, I remember people getting frustrated with Dreamweaver since it wouldn't let you put two spaces after a punctuation mark--Guess that's why.

We probably looked at the same sources then... :p
I'd argue that they should be used for the sake of making things less ambiguous and easier to read. What if a sentence ended with an abbreviation?

lol yeah. Truth be told, if someone seriously called it a saloon I'd probably laugh. :vlol:

I'm pretty sure that there is a saloon where I live... :o But no one ever calls it, or any other building, that either. Bar it is.

Another Lara
12-10-10, 07:51
I found out recently that the difference between words ending in "-ed" and "-t" is due to the Americans as well...

So the British version of the word for example is "learnt" while the Americans decided to soften it down to "learned"... apparently "t" is too hard to pronounce and so another option had to be given! :rolleyes:

jaywalker
12-10-10, 07:57
The gaming industry was made to adopt the US english as the default english for games. Some games do offer UK english as an option, but its rare.

We had a feature in a UK developed game that automatically converted any `US` spelled words to UK spelling, however our US office asked for it to be removed ;) boo eh?

The whole Z / S thing is the one standard out difference to me, using Word for windows etc its easy to know which dictionary you are using ;) but funniest is when people spelling Laser with a Z instead, saying its US spelling, erm, its an acronym ;) Means "Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation" :)

ShadyCroft
12-10-10, 07:58
now now, Brits and Yanks, lets all kiss and make out...I mean, make up :p

drakl0r
12-10-10, 08:08
Here in my country the English we use is based on British, though it's not uncommon to see a few American spellings and words thrown in...:p

And the word for mobile phone/cellular, here it would be "handphone" :p

jamieoliver22
12-10-10, 08:08
As Michael McIntyre puts it, Americans have to change their words to help them describe what it is. Such as "sidewalk" so people know exactly where to walk, or "shopping cart" so they know it is used for holding shopping... :whi:

Keir_Eidos
12-10-10, 08:10
I love the US accent. Americans chirp, it's so nice. An American can say anything and seem cooler than a Brit. Now I'm back in London I miss hearing their accent (and it's hot on girls). I like American terminology too and Americans liked mine, so I was sure to say words like lovely, cheers, rubbish and brilliant a lot :D

It's fresh in my mind, the differences I can think of are:

US: Bug (Actually bug is the older, more traditional word)
UK: Insect (Insect is newer, therefore Americans speak a more pure form of English in certain circumstances).

US: Restroom/bathroom
UK: Toilet/loo

US: Elevator
UK: Lift

US: Gas
UK: Petrol

US: Apartment
UK: Flat

US: Hood
UK: Bonnet

US: Trunk
UK: Boot

US: Truck
UK: Lorry/van

US: Freeway
UK: Motorway

US: Sidewalk
UK: Pavement

US: Fanny ( http://e.deviantart.net/emoticons/b/blush2.gif )
UK: Bum

US: Drug store
UK: Chemist

US: Eggplant
UK: Aubergine

US: Zucchini
UK: Courgette (well, I guess these are French)

US: Parking lot
UK: Car park

US: Garbage
UK: Rubbish

ShadyCroft
12-10-10, 08:11
As Michael McIntyre puts it, Americans have to change their words to help them describe what it is. Such as "sidewalk" so people know exactly where to walk, or "shopping cart" so they know it is used for holding shopping...

:vlol:

Another Lara
12-10-10, 08:12
As Michael McIntyre puts it, Americans have to change their words to help them describe what it is. Such as "sidewalk" so people know exactly where to walk, or "shopping cart" so they know it is used for holding shopping... :whi:


lmao, Michael McIntyre is pure legend! :vlol:

ggctuk
12-10-10, 08:25
US: Trash
UK: Rubbish

scion05
12-10-10, 08:31
One thing Americans say that hacks me off is:

"Could care less."

Err... hold it. So you could care less ? So it doesn't bother you ?

Try,

" I couldn't care less ".

;)

xb4b1x
12-10-10, 08:53
Us: pants
Uk: trousers

Us: sneakers
Uk: trainers

ggctuk
12-10-10, 09:01
Us: pants
Uk: trousers

Pants? Isn't that an article of men's underwear in the UK?

Us: sneakers
Uk: trainers

What's so sneaky about them? :p

Tear
12-10-10, 09:20
I hate the difference in spelling! >.< do you know they take points off a test for British spelling? :hea:

Ha, I did that all the time in high school.:p My teachers didn't care though, since they knew I was British at heart.;)

xb4b1x
12-10-10, 10:13
Ha, I did that all the time in high school.:p My teachers didn't care though, since they knew I was British at heart.;)


:D

Your_Envy*
12-10-10, 10:33
I find it just insulting when foreign students learn the American way. ITS NOT PROPER! :mad: :p

Not in my school. :p We always had British English. :D

ShadyCroft
12-10-10, 10:35
^same! but we always ended up using American English, pronunciation and spelling I mean, being influenced by American series and movies, you know.

and oooh I spot Ana! :cln:

Your_Envy*
12-10-10, 10:36
^same! but we always ended up using American English, pronunciation and spelling I mean, being influenced by American series and movies, you know.

and oooh I spot Ana! :cln:

Yes, same! :vlol: Nobody had that British accent except my teacher! But we always used "colour" and things like that. :D

And oooh I spot Shady! :cln: :D

Sgt BOMBULOUS
12-10-10, 10:40
In the UK they only use a "Z" unless they have no other choice. I think "Zoo" is the only one left...

ShadyCroft
12-10-10, 10:52
pretty sure when they wanna say I wanna go to bed on MSN, they'd say "sorry, gotta go Zzzzzz!" and not "gotta go Ssssss!" :)

@Ana: :hug:

Los Angeles
12-10-10, 10:56
US: Pizza
UK: 'za

wmcintosh
12-10-10, 11:01
Bar not saloon.

Only time I ever hear of saloon is in the old west.

drakl0r
12-10-10, 11:10
US: Fall
UK: Autumn

:P

Lara's Nemesis
12-10-10, 11:42
US: soccer
The whole planet except US: football



Surprisingly the word soccer was first used in England. It was an abbreviation of Football Association.

The Americans pinched it after they decided to call their throw/catch ball game football tho.:D

digitizedboy
12-10-10, 11:47
US : Faucet
UK : Tap

US: Fanny pack
UK: Bum bag ("fanny" is very bad in the UK, I hear)


That word cracks me up, especially the way Americans use it. I once heard Eddie Murphy in a movie say "OWW, MY FANNY!!". It just didn't sound right. LOL

CiaKonwerski
12-10-10, 11:50
I use like a mix. I sometimes say many UK English words, then on occasion I use US English words, I am from the US BTW. It is weird, they just sound classier or something IMO.

Phlip
12-10-10, 11:54
Pronunciation of words:

US: Mask
UK: Marsk

US: Ards
UK: Odds

xb4b1x
12-10-10, 11:57
Pfft i dont say marsk..

Legends
12-10-10, 11:57
I find it just insulting when foreign students learn the American way. ITS NOT PROPER! :mad: :p
What?! It sure is proper, and the only people who don't think it is must be British! Thank god they aren't learning that!! :mad:

The correct way! :D
Yes! :D
As Michael McIntyre puts it, Americans have to change their words to help them describe what it is. Such as "sidewalk" so people know exactly where to walk, or "shopping cart" so they know it is used for holding shopping... :whi:
Haha, but only because the British words are so stupid! Who says pavement? Obviously not me, but I am not British. I like my American ways, and I happen to think that most American words are better.

US: Restroom/bathroom
UK: Toilet/loo

I hate that word... "loo". It sounds so nasty. I am so glad I don't have to hear it every day.

digitizedboy
12-10-10, 12:00
Pfft i dont say marsk..

Isn't that more how the "posh" people say it?

xb4b1x
12-10-10, 12:00
Isn't that more how the "posh" people say it?

Exactly

Ada the Mental
12-10-10, 12:05
I find it just insulting when foreign students learn the American way. ITS NOT PROPER! :mad: :p

We learn the Queen's English here. :p

Spelling words like "colour" and "neighbour" without the u looks just wrong to me. However, I tend to use American expressions.

Dennis's Mom
12-10-10, 12:19
US: donut
UK: doughnut


"Doughnut" is still correct in the US; you're not going to find it on many shops though because most shops have electric letters. "Donut" is considerably cheaper to buy letters for. :p

scoopy_loopy
12-10-10, 13:05
That's an interesting list, I didn't know some of those. I took the liberty of filling in some Australianisms, too. (Although there will redoubtably be some Aussies here who will disagree with me, Australian English is a bit more fluid I think.)


US: Bug (Actually bug is the older, more traditional word)
UK: Insect (Insect is newer, therefore Americans speak a more pure form of English in certain circumstances).
Au:Either - although I'd go with insect 99% of the time, also I've never used "bugs" only "insects" for the plural.

US: Restroom/bathroom
UK: Toilet/loo
Au:Either.

US: Elevator
UK: Lift
Au:Either

US: Gas
UK: Petrol
Au:Petrol

US: Apartment
UK: Flat
Au:Either, or unit.

US: Hood
UK: Bonnet
Au:Bonnet

US: Trunk
UK: Boot
Au: Boot

US: Truck
UK: Lorry/van
Au: Truck, or van - definitely not lorry.

US: Freeway
UK: Motorway
Au: They're different things here, but what the difference is escapes me. Freeways have higher speed limits, I think and are generally more direct between cities.

US: Sidewalk
UK: Pavement
Au: Sidewalk (We have another name for this too that is really common, but I just can't think what it is! :mad:)

US: Fanny ( http://e.deviantart.net/emoticons/b/blush2.gif )
UK: Bum
Au: Bum, fanny here means the same as it does in the UK :cln:

US: Drug store
UK: Chemist
Au: Chemist

US: Eggplant
UK: Aubergine
Au: Either. (Although Aubergine is rarer.)

US: Zucchini
UK: Courgette (well, I guess these are French)
Au: Zucchini

US: Parking lot
UK: Car park
Au: Either. A parking lot infers a more substantial structure though, perhaps something multi-storied. A car-park is usually open to the air, or single storied.

US: Garbage
UK: Rubbish
Au: Either

Squibbly
12-10-10, 13:26
^ We use most of the US words in those examples, except I call "parking lots" car parks instead.

There are spelling nuances

-or in America (color)
-our in UK (colour)

-ize in America (stylize)
-ise in UK (stylise)

Pardon if the above examples are not accurate. I'm from the US so I don't know all the different conventions between UK and US :o

Yep, that's right. Here in Canada, we use British English spelling.

More examples: favourite (favorite in USA), neighbour (neighbor in USA), behaviour (behavior in USA)... words like that are different.

I like our spellings better. "Color" makes no sense to me whatsoever. It looks like "co-LORE". :p

xXhayleyroxXx
12-10-10, 13:41
Interesting thread :tmb: The pronounciations for both countries are'nt exactly true though. Like I say mass-k for mask not marsk. And I say bath not barth. Sc -on not scone (pronounced like stone). I remember having an argument with a southerner when I was little about that :p

I can easily switch from Northumbrian/Geordie dialect to traditional English as well, and can happily talk in either.

jjbennett
12-10-10, 13:42
The difference between the two is simple. One is correct (English), one is wrong (American).

xb4b1x
12-10-10, 13:43
Interesting thread :tmb: The pronounciations for both countries are'nt exactly true though. Like I say mass-k for mask not marsk. And I say bath not barth. Sc -on not scone (pronounced like stone). I remember having an argument with a southerner when I was little about that :p

I can easily switch from Northumbrian/Geordie dialect to traditional English as well, and can happily talk in either.

i pronounce the exact same :D

Squibbly
12-10-10, 13:44
Interesting thread :tmb: The pronounciations for both countries are'nt exactly true though. Like I say mass-k for mask not marsk. And I say bath not barth. Sc -on not scone (pronounced like stone). I remember having an argument with a southerner when I was little about that :p

I can easily switch from Northumbrian/Geordie dialect to traditional English as well, and can happily talk in either.

lol, I always giggle when people from over there describe words in an English accent that would be, using your example, words like "barth" for bath. That would be said entirely different to me.

The English accent way to me would be more like "bawth" and barth would be... well, BAR-th. :p

The difference between the two is simple. One is correct (English), one is wrong (American).

I feel the same way! lol

xXhayleyroxXx
12-10-10, 13:47
i pronounce the exact same :D
Awesome ^_^ where in england are you?

lol, I always giggle when people from over there describe words in an English accent that would be, using your example, words like "barth" for bath. That would be said entirely different to me.

The English way to me would be more like "bawth" and barth would be... well, BAR-th. :p



I feel the same way! lol
weird :p
and In northumbrian that is wee-erd haha.

cezy rockeru
12-10-10, 13:50
I hate english accent[besides Lara's] because for me it sounds like something's stuck in your neck:cln:

xXhayleyroxXx
12-10-10, 13:51
I hate english accent[besides Lara's] because for me it sounds like something's stuck in your neck:cln:

:O

there are loads of different english accents you know, for each county.

digitizedboy
12-10-10, 13:51
Not everyone in the UK speaks like Lara Croft. lol

Mikky
12-10-10, 13:52
I pronounce arse, arse, but i like to write colour, color. Whatever suits me best, I guess. And "ass" sounds weird. :p

xb4b1x
12-10-10, 13:53
I hate english accent[besides Lara's] because for me it sounds like something's stuck in your neck:cln:

lolwut? the northen accent is uber :D

xXhayleyroxXx
12-10-10, 13:54
lolwut? the northen accent is uber :D


yes it is :tmb:

xcrushterx
12-10-10, 14:08
i heard a Ginger is NOT a Spicey Root in UK language, i heard it means something totaly different

Reading this, I thought of:

http://s.bebo.com/app-image/7926040426/5411656627/PROFILE/i.quizzaz.com/img/q/u/08/03/31/geri_halliwell_spice_girls_67654.jpg

Anyway, I hate it when Americans tell me I've mispelled something when I haven't used the American spelling. Annoying! It's even worse when they use it to try and insult your intelligence. Although this does open the door to some awesome comebacks :D

Squibbly
12-10-10, 14:12
Anyway, I hate it when Americans tell me I've mispelled something when I haven't used the American spelling. Annoying! It's even worse when they use it to try and insult your intelligence. Although this does open the door to some awesome comebacks :D

I can't stand that!

Someone said to me once, "you spelled colour wrong."

I explained to them that was the spelling here, and they argued with me telling me it was the wrong way to spell it, end of.

:hea:

Legend of Lara
12-10-10, 14:25
British English is just better.

Agent 47
12-10-10, 14:26
:O

there are loads of different english accents you know, for each county.

You've just shattered the illusion of foreigners that we all sound the same.

Shame on you :smk: :D

lara c. fan
12-10-10, 15:47
US: Elevator
UK: Lift

US: Movie
UK: Film
tbh I don't like English accents,but I like Irish ones:p

UK: phone,ring
US:call
i heard a Ginger is NOT a Spicey Root in UK language, i heard it means something totaly different


US: Bug (Actually bug is the older, more traditional word)
UK: Insect (Insect is newer, therefore Americans speak a more pure form of English in certain circumstances).

US: Restroom/bathroom
UK: Toilet/loo

US: Elevator
UK: Lift

These are all of the ones I disagree with personally, as I've definitely heard both of them many times over here. And not just from the people who come from America. :p
And the ginger thing is just wrong. Seriously. It still is a spicy root... :p

Isn't that more how the "posh" people say it?

Exactly

I wouldn't exactly count myself as posh, and yet I say it that way.

Another Lara
12-10-10, 15:52
I wouldn't exactly count myself as posh, and yet I say it that way.

You're from Kent, so to a common Northerner of course you're posh! ;)

lara c. fan
12-10-10, 15:52
You're from Kent, so to a common Northerner of course you're posh! ;)

Dangnabbit!

Rai
12-10-10, 16:06
The England English accent is a lot newer than the American one.

The "American" type of generic accent was actually the way people spoke back in the day in England. The English settlers continued to speak that way here in the Americas while England had a change of dialect.

Just some quick trivia! :wve:

Where did you learn that? :confused:

US: Pizza
UK: 'za

No, it's pizza :p

Agent 47
12-10-10, 16:26
You're from Kent, so to a common Northerner of course you're posh! ;)

Is that a thin insult to Northerners by any chance?

Where did you learn that? :confused:
No, it's pizza :p

Yes i thought that myself, how does he explain the Australian accent then.

Mad Tony
12-10-10, 16:45
Isn't that more how the "posh" people say it?No it's how normal British people say it.

Lemmie
12-10-10, 16:48
I find the linguistic differences interesting as well. For example, in standard American and English accents, the words 'pool' and 'pull' are said differently.

In Standard Scottish English, which is more like my accent, not so.

Minty Mouth
12-10-10, 16:49
Something that annoys me:

How Americans drop the 'h' in herbs.

woody543
12-10-10, 16:50
UK: Aluminium
US: Aluminum

And just a point on this piece of incorrect trivia.

The England English accent is a lot newer than the American one.

The "American" type of generic accent was actually the way people spoke back in the day in England. The English settlers continued to speak that way here in the Americas while England had a change of dialect.

Just some quick trivia! :wve:

Actually, this cannot be proven, merely speculated against, and in fact you can tell from the works of people like Shakespeare, which would have been influenced by dialects and accents, it's not that new, and so it may be argued that The English continued to speak that way, and the colonists changed.

We could argue it all day, however it is more than likely that both accents have changed since "back in the day" meaning neither is "newer"

Mad Tony
12-10-10, 16:54
I find it hilarious how incredibly anal people get over the minor differences. :D

xb4b1x
12-10-10, 16:55
Something that annoys me:

How Americans drop the 'h' in herbs.

So do i and i aint american

Minty Mouth
12-10-10, 16:56
So do i and i aint american

So you pronounce it 'Urbz'? Americans don't just slur it, they get rid of the 'h' sound completely.

lara c. fan
12-10-10, 16:57
People who say "ain't" annoy me. Sticks out too much.

drakl0r
12-10-10, 16:57
Something that annoys me:

How Americans drop the 'h' in herbs.

Spanish influence? :D

xb4b1x
12-10-10, 16:58
People who say "ain't" annoy me. Sticks out too much.

:(

Legend of Lara
12-10-10, 17:00
People who say "ain't" annoy me. Sticks out too much.

Dood, dat shiz ain't be fo' gettin' the dissment by yous.

lara c. fan
12-10-10, 17:01
Dood, dat shiz ain't be fo' gettin' the dissment by yous.

Shut up, you.

Legend of Lara
12-10-10, 17:01
Shut up, you.

But I ain't be willing to. :'(

lara c. fan
12-10-10, 17:03
But I ain't be willing to. :'(

Sure you "ain't".

Legend of Lara
12-10-10, 17:03
Sure you "ain't".

That's right.

I ain't.

lara c. fan
12-10-10, 17:04
That's right.

I ain't.

God damn you!

MiCkiZ88
12-10-10, 17:07
The difference is that Brits complain, nag, ***** and whine about the smallest of mistakes, whilst Americans just chillax and don't focus on tiny detail.

:p

*tries to dodge the grammar nazi bullets*

I think a lot of people hate me for speaking a combination of British and American English...

rickybazire
12-10-10, 17:55
The two things that get me, are when the Americans call it 'gas'. I know it's short for 'gasoline' but it's a liquid...which makes me laugh. "I'm going to the gas station to buy some gas and pour it like a liquid into my car". :D

The other thing is where Americans call it soccer and the other sport football. The rest of the world call it American football. Surely if something was called football, it should be related to a foot and a ball. American football rarely uses the feet whereas football in the UK uses the feet a heck of a lot.

Oo, also another thing is where the Americans call it the World Series...when they are the only ones to play it! :tea:

I'm probably wrong about that last one, so forgive if it is.

I don't mean to be having a row at the Americans if that's what it looks like.

EDIT: As for the word: ain't. I think I have a theory about that word. If you say 'I ain't got the ball', you mean 'I haven't got the ball'. The n't means not, so it's therefore ai not. 'Ai' in French is essentially 'have'.

xXhayleyroxXx
12-10-10, 17:56
You've just shattered the illusion of foreigners that we all sound the same.

Shame on you :smk: :D

I'm sorry :p

Mad Tony
12-10-10, 18:03
The two things that get me, are when the Americans call it 'gas'. I know it's short for 'gasoline' but it's a liquid...which makes me laugh. "I'm going to the gas station to buy some gas and pour it like a liquid into my car". :DBut gasoline is a liquid, just not the stuff you put in your car.

The other thing is where Americans call it soccer and the other sport football. The rest of the world call it American football. Surely if something was called football, it should be related to a foot and a ball. American football rarely uses the feet whereas football in the UK uses the feet a heck of a lot.To be fair a lot of countries call football soccer. Australians do it. In certain parts of Australia they call rugby league footy.

jackles
12-10-10, 18:06
*wonders if the 'ginger' business is because of cockney rhyming slang*

Biddy
12-10-10, 18:07
Only ones I've got in mind right now are ass and arse and fries and chips. Ooh, and candy and sweets. :p

digitizedboy
12-10-10, 18:09
cockney rhyming slang makes me chuckle

"I'm just goin for a gypsy's kiss..."

Squibbly
12-10-10, 18:13
Just remembered another difference.

Americans call it soda, Canadians call it pop, and the English call it fizzy drink. Don't know about Australia or anywhere else.

Chocola teapot
12-10-10, 18:13
Dood, dat shiz ain't be fo' gettin' the dissment by yous.

If B to the E to the Ezch is considered circumvention, That probably would be too?

Even though the word in question is worse? :confused:

lara c. fan
12-10-10, 18:14
Squibbly: Or soft drinks.

Squibbly
12-10-10, 18:16
Oh, yes, forgot about that one.

Chocola teapot
12-10-10, 18:16
Just remembered another difference.

Americans call it soda, Canadians call it pop, and the English call it fizzy drink. Don't know about Australia or anywhere else.

I never call it 'Fizzy Drink'...

Just Pop.

:p

Mad Tony
12-10-10, 18:17
Just remembered another difference.Don't know about Australia or anywhere else.Bangeroozy

jjbennett
12-10-10, 18:18
cockney rhyming slang makes me chuckle

"I'm just goin for a gypsy's kiss..."
In my area of the midlands theres quite a lot of rhyming slang used. I had to explain to someone the other day what i meant when i said something was "brown bread".

digitizedboy
12-10-10, 18:24
^ I thought that one was quite popular everywhere TBH. At least I know I've heard it a few times in Birmingham to describe dead.

Mad Tony
12-10-10, 18:25
Brummies use cockney rhyming slang? Must admit I've never heard it before.

Agent 47
12-10-10, 18:31
The difference is that Brits complain, nag, ***** and whine about the smallest of mistakes, whilst Americans just chillax and don't focus on tiny detail.

:p

*tries to dodge the grammar nazi bullets*

I think a lot of people hate me for speaking a combination of British and American English...

I think you've got our nations mixed up, Brits hardly complain, we RANT big difference :D we only complain about crappy stuff like the weather apparently.

We don't file lawsuits left right and centre, we don't get in peoples faces. We survived the blitz, terrorist bombs, and WE get on with life, we don't :cen: and moan about it.

[?rant] why, i do believe i've woken up :jmp:

I'm sorry :p

It's ok i'll forgive you....today :vlol: :hug:

digitizedboy
12-10-10, 18:31
@ Mad Tony

Nah, Brummies don't use Cockney rhyming slang. But "brown bread" I've heard a few times around here, that's all.

toxicraider
12-10-10, 18:39
The England English accent is a lot newer than the American one.

The "American" type of generic accent was actually the way people spoke back in the day in England. The English settlers continued to speak that way here in the Americas while England had a change of dialect.

Just some quick trivia! :wve:
I don't believe that at all. Considering a lot of the immigrant population were Irish and from Continental Europe, I doubt that the original accent remained in the US, and changed in the UK. Both have probably changed from the orginal english though.

But gasoline is a liquid, just not the stuff you put in your car.


Yeah it is :confused:
Unless you use diesel.

robm_2007
12-10-10, 18:40
Pronunciation of words:

US: Mask
UK: Marsk

US: Ards
UK: Odds

WTH is an Ard? i now what and Odd is.

*laralover*
12-10-10, 18:47
Well im used to this from having a American bf :p We used to rant about words though. I get annoyed by some words like "leever"/"lever" i prefer our way but i prefer the Americans pronunciation of Tomatoe :D I tend to say alot of American/English and Scottish words so it doesnt bother me :whi:I think being around people from different places opens you up to different words/accents/languages :D

Mad Tony
12-10-10, 19:16
I think you've got our nations mixed up, Brits hardly complain, we RANT big difference :D we only complain about crappy stuff like the weather apparently.

We don't file lawsuits left right and centre, we don't get in peoples faces. We survived the blitz, terrorist bombs, and WE get on with life, we don't :cen: and moan about it.That's a bit harsh don't you think? I think Micki was only half right. I've heard my fair share of moaners on both sides.

Rest assured people, not all Brits are as angry and grumpy as this.

Yeah it is :confused:
Unless you use diesel.You put petroleum or diesel in your car.

toxicraider
12-10-10, 19:20
You put petroleum or diesel in your car.
Petroleum usually means crude oil, and gasoline is another word for petrol, as far as I know.

MiCkiZ88
12-10-10, 19:20
I put gas in my tank. Just another word for petrol.I think you've got our nations mixed up, Brits hardly complain, we RANT big difference :D we only complain about crappy stuff like the weather apparently.

We don't file lawsuits left right and centre, we don't get in peoples faces. We survived the blitz, terrorist bombs, and WE get on with life, we don't :cen: and moan about it.

[?rant] why, i do believe i've woken up :jmp:
Well you RANT and rant about language and the difference between europe - uk, uk - america.. and so on forth.

You don't give a rats ass about anything else.. :p

Mad Tony
12-10-10, 19:21
Petroleum usually means crude oil, and gasoline is another word for petrol, as far as I know.I was always told gasoline is what they put in planes.

Minty Mouth
12-10-10, 19:22
I was always told gasoline is what they put in planes.
My brain is telling me 'Kerosene'. My brain in unreliable, though.

toxicraider
12-10-10, 19:23
I was always told gasoline is what they put in planes.
Kerosene, I think. But they're all just groups of chemicals, not anything specific, so probably overlap a little I guess.

MiCkiZ88
12-10-10, 19:24
My brain is telling me 'Kerosene'. My brain in unreliable, though.
Yep :tmb: I remember some idiots stole jet fuel from an airport.. fools tried to drive away with that in their tank.

Cochrane
12-10-10, 19:27
I think a lot of people hate me for speaking a combination of British and American English...
I guess most europeans (except native english speakers, obviously) do that. At least over here, schools all teach british english, but when going on the internet, watching movies and so on, the vast majority of content is american.

The other thing is where Americans call it soccer and the other sport football. The rest of the world call it American football. Surely if something was called football, it should be related to a foot and a ball. American football rarely uses the feet whereas football in the UK uses the feet a heck of a lot.
Thatís why I always say soccer or american football. Way too confusing, those two languages. :D

Oo, also another thing is where the Americans call it the World Series...when they are the only ones to play it! :tea:
There is also a Cable Car Bell Ringing World Championship. As you might imagine, it is only ever held in San Francisco and the only performers are from San Francisco, but still, they get to call themselves "World Champion". Itís not technically wrong, is it? :D

MiCkiZ88
12-10-10, 19:29
I guess most europeans (except native english speakers, obviously) do that. At least over here, schools all teach british english, but when going on the internet, watching movies and so on, the vast majority of content is american.


My English teacher would actually give minus points if you used American English in your exams. Nitpicking about your accent as well.. pointless really considering most had the horrible Finnish way of pronouncing things.

toxicraider
12-10-10, 19:40
My English teacher would actually give minus points if you used American English in your exams. Nitpicking about your accent as well.. pointless really considering most had the horrible Finnish way of pronouncing things.
That seems rather harsh. As long as it's consistent then it shouldn't matter which spelling/words you use.
Although British English is the correct version.:whi:

Agent 47
12-10-10, 19:46
My English teacher would actually give minus points if you used American English in your exams. Nitpicking about your accent as well.. pointless really considering most had the horrible Finnish way of pronouncing things.

Quite right too, i'd mark down any pupil that uses the word "of" instead of "have" just because clown shoes is too lazy to type/write a four letter word,
D- i reckon that's deserves :jmp:

That's a pet peeve :D

MattTR
12-10-10, 19:52
I totally forgot about actual word differences, I usually think of spelling differences like color and colour. :ton:

toxicraider
12-10-10, 20:03
Quite right too, i'd mark down any pupil that uses the word "of" instead of "have" just because clown shoes is too lazy to type/write a four letter word,
D- i reckon that's deserves :jmp:

That's a pet peeve :D
Is that an American thing? I've seen plenty of British people make that mistake. Same for 'could care less', which also annoys me. :p

SkyPuppy
12-10-10, 20:09
People who say "ain't" annoy me. Sticks out too much.

erm... i actually hate that word, too... but, it's not really a word, right? o_o


so i ain't going to say it. <_<

I never call it 'Fizzy Drink'...

Just Pop.

:p

soda. D:

MiCkiZ88
12-10-10, 20:09
You guys do know that this is extremely confusing for us who speak English as their second language. I can speak English properly, but whenever I write something on the forums I have to triple check what I have just written! Strangest thing is that when I try to speak it out, it comes of completely different and sounds odd. :o

And I use ain't a lot. :p

Agent 47
12-10-10, 20:13
Is that an American thing? I've seen plenty of British people make that mistake. Same for 'could care less', which also annoys me. :p

Sadly toxic no! i do believe it's a British thing,from down south i'd hazard a guess. Unfortuanely it has rubbed off on Americans though.

To be honest i was very surprised when i saw Americans using "could of" "should of" would of" :( they have my sympathies

The "could care less" thing though is American :D

toxicraider
12-10-10, 20:20
Sadly toxic no! i do believe it's a British thing,from down south i'd hazard a guess. Unfortuanely it has rubbed off on Americans though.

To be honest i was very surprised when i saw Americans using "could of" "should of" would of" :( they have my sympathies

The "could care less" thing though is American :D
Oh ok, I thought you were saying it was an American English thing.
Sadly, people from both seem to make most of the same mistakes. :p

leglion
12-10-10, 20:31
Pronunciation
hilarious - British

hu(ha)larious - American

Agent 47
12-10-10, 20:42
You guys do know that this is extremely confusing for us who speak English as their second language. I can speak English properly, but whenever I write something on the forums I have to triple check what I have just written! Strangest thing is that when I try to speak it out, it comes of completely different and sounds odd. :o

And I use ain't a lot. :p

Non English speakers can be forgiven though for any errors. The natives however have no excuse :D

Oh ok, I thought you were saying it was an American English thing.
Sadly, people from both seem to make most of the same mistakes. :p

No, can't blame the US for that one :D I think it's an accent thing, some people type it as they say it in their head, "of" sounds like "have" and so they type down "of" instead. :vlol:

toxicraider
12-10-10, 20:48
Non English speakers can be forgiven though for any errors. The natives however have no excuse :D



No, can't blame the US for that one :D I think it's an accent thing, some people type it as they say it in their head, "of" sounds like "have" and so they type down "of" instead. :vlol:
Yeah, definitely.
Although it is rather strange when you consider that "would've" and "could've" are the same length as "would of" and "could of", are spelled even more phonetically, and are grammatically correct. :p

Rai
12-10-10, 21:23
Is that an American thing? I've seen plenty of British people make that mistake. Same for 'could care less', which also annoys me. :p

I've always thought it came from confusion from 'Would have', 'could have' etc being shortened to 'would've' 'could've', people think it's 'could of', when in fact that's incorrect. I like giving peeps the benefit of the doubt. Or, it could just be darn laziness :p And don't listen to Agent whatsit numbers, he knows not what he talks of. From the South indeed :glares* :p.

Urgh, 'could care less' is soo annoying. It's 'Couldn't', as in 'could not', people!

EmeraldFields
12-10-10, 21:36
Just remembered another difference.

Americans call it soda, Canadians call it pop, and the English call it fizzy drink. Don't know about Australia or anywhere else.

It all depends on where you live in the US. Here's a map of the different names that are given to soft drinks:

http://imgur.com/D7lgo.jpg

toxicraider
12-10-10, 21:40
It all depends on where you live in the US. Here's a map of the different names that are given to soft drinks:

http://imgur.com/D7lgo.jpg
Just remembered another difference.

Americans call it soda, Canadians call it pop, and the English call it fizzy drink. Don't know about Australia or anywhere else.
Ok, I'm confused. I thought Soda was Lemonade? And Coke is completely different. (PS I hope the map is refering to the drink :pi:)

Laras Dream
12-10-10, 21:42
Naw man, that's the Irish. :ton:
--

US: Shoping Cart
UK: Trolly
*coughs* Eh hem, what who your talking to.

EmeraldFields
12-10-10, 21:48
Ok, I'm confused. I thought Soda was Lemonade? And Coke is completely different. (PS I hope the map is refering to the drink :pi:)

In the US, "soda", "pop", and "coke" are all names for soft drinks like Pepsi, Fanta, etc. Living in Nebraska, I've always called it "pop", so when I went to the South a couple summers back it was weird because all pop is referred to as "coke". A waitress asked me, "Do you want a coke?" And I said, "Yes please." Then she said, "Which kind?" :p

And apparently "lemonade" has different meanings around the world as well:

"Clear" lemonade: In many western European countries, the term limonade, from which the term "lemonade" is derived, originally applied to unsweetened water or carbonated soda water with lemon juice added, although several versions of sugar sweetened limonade have arrived on store shelves.

"Cloudy" lemonade (U.K. term): In the U.S., Canada, Pakistan, India (Nimbu Paani), and Iran lemonade refers to a mixture of lemon juice, sugar, and uncarbonated water, although there are many versions which contain artificial flavors instead of actual lemon juice. In India, Nimbu Paani is a common household preparation, made using freshly-squeezed lemons, granulated sugar, salt, pepper (and other spices according to personal taste) and is invariably consumed fresh.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lemonade

robm_2007
12-10-10, 22:02
Lemonade can also mean Pee.

:eek:

Laras Dream
12-10-10, 22:02
The difference between the two is simple. One is correct (English), one is wrong (American).
Yes, and this is because English originated from England. So I don't know why American's think they invented English, they just modified it slightly for America.

Mad Tony
12-10-10, 22:04
I don't know why people think American English is wrong and British English is right and vice versa. Neither are right or wrong. They're different variations, as the names suggest.

EmeraldFields
12-10-10, 22:04
Lemonade can also mean Pee.

:eek:

Milk, milk, lemonade, 'round the back's where chocolate's made. :p

xb4b1x
12-10-10, 22:06
Milk, milk, lemonade, 'round the back's where chocolate's made. :p

:vlol:

Laras Dream
12-10-10, 22:08
I don't know why people think American English is wrong and British English is right and vice versa. Neither are right or wrong. They're different variations, as the names suggest.
We're not saying it's wrong! We are saying that sometimes American's seem to think they invented English, like, "Do you speak American?" Seriously.

robm_2007
12-10-10, 22:12
Yes, and this is because English originated from England. So I don't know why American's think they invented English, they just modified it slightly for America.

But the first (foreign) Americans were English, who came from England :pi:
-------------
they are just different dialects of English; like Hoch Deutsche (AFAIR, is the German that the Germans speak), and the other variations are Austrian German, Belgian German, etc.

Laras Dream
12-10-10, 22:14
But the first (foreign) Americans were English, who came from England :pi:
-------------
they are just different dialects of English; like Hoch Deutsche (AFAIR, is the German that the Germans speak), and the other variations are Austrian German, Belgian German, etc.
You're not gonna beat me or screw me? What kinda marriage is this? Bring a book.

voltz
12-10-10, 22:26
Lemonade can also mean Pee.

:eek:

I could just imagine kids trying to sell some.

"Want some lemonade?"

:eek:

no....thank you. (walks away nervously.)

kthnxbai
12-10-10, 22:28
I think there's an even greater difference between Hiberno-English and standard British English...

not in spelling so much, but in colloquialisms...

maybe I'm biased though I dunno....

I still find how things are spelled in American English to be just plain wrong... Which is really annoying when you're a coder and colour is spelled color... and when my spellchecker gives out about colour....

It's just not right.... not right at all...

esophagus or oesophagus... I just can't deal with the whole vaguely phonetic manner of American-English... like, where's the fun in a word being pronounced as it's spelled??

Encore
12-10-10, 22:31
And apparently "lemonade" has different meanings around the world as well:
"Clear" lemonade: In many western European countries, the term limonade, from which the term "lemonade" is derived, originally applied to unsweetened water or carbonated soda water with lemon juice added, although several versions of sugar sweetened limonade have arrived on store shelves.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lemonade



Wait, what? :confused: I live in western Europe myself, over here we call the home made version "limonada", and it consists of squeezed lemon juice, normal water, and sugar. It's quite popular, but I've never heard of people making limonada at home without adding sugar.

Cochrane
12-10-10, 22:36
they are just different dialects of English; like Hoch Deutsche (AFAIR, is the German that the Germans speak), and the other variations are Austrian German, Belgian German, etc.

That may not be entirely true. The dialects of german have always existed in one continuous area and influenced each other. You could actually argue that they were different languages that grew closer to each other. The basis of "Hochdeutsch", the standard german variant, was actually invented by Martin Luther when he translated the bible to german, based on the most common dialects. As far as I know, the history of Italian is quite similar: Many different but similar dialects merging to form one standard language.

The division in various countries have, of course, led to some differences, much like in the UK and the US. The swiss, for example, donít use the letter Ŗ, which is quite common in german and austrian german. Those differences are, for the most part, not as large as the ones between US and UK english. However, when a swiss or austrian speaker slips into full local dialect mode, they arenít any easier to understand than a dutch person. That is not true for the division between the US and the UK. Instead, such a division exists between England and Scotland, for example.

The US, though, started with the same language as the UK, but was for the most part very separate from it, and cultural exchange was not really possible for quite a long time. There was the occasional letter and book, obviously, but the amount of americans who talked with english people was probably pretty low on any given day. With different influences, the languages diverged. Today, of course, that cultural exchange is no problem, so I wouldnít be surprised if the languages were to grow closer together again in the next 100 years or so.


(By the way, because you mentioned Belgian German: That is essentially identical to normal german. The local dialect is also identical to the local dialect in the areas of Germany directly bordering the german-speaking Community of Belgium. At only 74,000 inhabitants, they canĎt really afford to make up their own version of the language.)

Agent 47
12-10-10, 22:58
Yes, and this is because English originated from England. So I don't know why American's think they invented English, they just modified it slightly for America.

The closest living relatives of English are the Scots language (spoken primarily in Scotland and parts of Ireland) and Frisian (spoken on the southern fringes of the North Sea in Denmark, the Netherlands, and Germany).

English is not an official language in either the United States or the United Kingdom.Although the United States federal government has no official languages, English has been given official status by 30 of the 50 state governments. Although falling short of official status, English is also an important language in several former colonies and protectorates of the United Kingdom, such as Bahrain, Bangladesh, Brunei, Malaysia, and the United Arab Emirates. English is not an official language of Israel, but is taken as a required second language at all Jewish and Arab schools and therefore widely spoken.

Because English is so widely spoken, it has often been referred to as a "world language", the lingua franca of the modern era, and while it is not an official language in most countries, it is currently the language most often taught as a foreign language. Some linguists believe that it is no longer the exclusive cultural property of "native English speakers", but is rather a language that is absorbing aspects of cultures worldwide as it continues to grow. It is, by international treaty, the official language for aerial and maritime communications. English is an official language of the United Nations and many other international organisations, including the International Olympic Committee.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/English_language

Trigger_happy
12-10-10, 23:44
erm... i actually hate that word, too... but, it's not really a word, right? o_o


Actually, ain't is a perfectly good word- its a contraction of am or is not. I do love ain't I do.

Its on Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ain't#Ain.27t

robm_2007
13-10-10, 00:04
You're not gonna beat me or screw me? What kinda marriage is this? Bring a book.

my signature doesnt even apply to this conversation, so go sacrifice some coconuts to your monkey Gods if you cant think of a relevant response.
Long and intelligent post

Well, i only know what i remember from German class :p; but that was 3 1/2 years ago. i only mentioned Beligian German, as a separate dialect of German, cuz i know they speak German it in Belgium; i assumed they had their own dialect; kinda like how even various states in the US might have their own dialects (and accents) of American English :p

but, no matter, i wasnt totally correct and i like to learn new things, especially if it relates to something that i have studied :D

scoopy_loopy
13-10-10, 01:34
Just remembered another difference.

Americans call it soda, Canadians call it pop, and the English call it fizzy drink. Don't know about Australia or anywhere else.

We call it soft drink. :)

Bangeroozy

What? :vlol:

Solice
13-10-10, 02:10
I always like this...


3UgpfSp2t6k

chobits743
13-10-10, 02:17
A lot of the British would get a kick outta my accent, being from the South and all. :o

I like to say y`all when referring to a group of people, and that throws some people off. :D

scoopy_loopy
13-10-10, 03:20
I always like this...


3UgpfSp2t6k

Her Australian was way too forced and over-the-top, certainly for someone pretending to be from Sydney. Yeuch. But otherwise, impressive!

"I was born in London, weren't I." :vlol: I love that accent the most. Silly chavs :p

patriots88888
13-10-10, 03:33
What's with the 't's' at the end of words... learnt, spelt, etc...? I always preferred the 'ed's', learned, spelled, etc... and think they sound more proper. :ohn:

Having said that, it's all good either way. :p

robm_2007
13-10-10, 04:49
What's with the 't's' at the end of words... learnt, spelt, etc...? I always preferred the 'ed's', learned, spelled, etc... and think they sound more proper. :ohn:

Having said that, it's all good either way. :p

which is the American way? i cant remeber how we were taught. spelt sounds better than spelled; but learnt seems so weird.

sometimes i spell colour, favourite, etc. the British way on purpose, that way my essays will seem slightly longer, lol.

Avalon SARL
13-10-10, 05:10
Lol
Pardon me i always thought that the American language was SLANG...
And British had the accurate spelling and writing...????

isnt it? :confused:

patriots88888
13-10-10, 05:25
which is the American way? i cant remeber how we were taught. spelt sounds better than spelled; but learnt seems so weird.

As far as I know it's how it is being taught still in American schools. It was when I attended over 25 years ago anyways. *shrugs*

Lol
Pardon me i always thought that the American language was SLANG...
And British had the accurate spelling and writing...????

isnt it? :confused:

I don't think either are slang or either one is considered more accurate over another. Just preference I believe. :)

Anyways, I was only pointing out some of the differences I'm more familiar with. Wasn't trying to incite any animosity. :p

Another Lara
13-10-10, 07:27
What's with the 't's' at the end of words... learnt, spelt, etc...? I always preferred the 'ed's', learned, spelled, etc... and think they sound more proper. :ohn:

Having said that, it's all good either way. :p

I prefer the other way, with the "t" at the end, don't know why, think it just finished off the word better maybe lol! :o

which is the American way? i cant remeber how we were taught. spelt sounds better than spelled; but learnt seems so weird.

sometimes i spell colour, favourite, etc. the British way on purpose, that way my essays will seem slightly longer, lol.


The British way is with the "t" on the end, the American way is "-ed"

Keir_Eidos
13-10-10, 08:00
These are all of the ones I disagree with personally, as I've definitely heard both of them many times over here. And not just from the people who come from America. :p


That's because the UK is saturated with American culture these days, and younger people pick it up. American TV and even soaps like Neighbours (when it was getting 20m viewers back in the day) have had a profound effect on the way the British speak.

I find it hilarious how incredibly anal people get over the minor differences. :D

I love the differences!

Trigger_happy
13-10-10, 12:49
I always like this...


3UgpfSp2t6k

Its a pity- she's so good at accents, but goes straight for cockney guv'nor and the Queen. There are a few more accents in the UK then those two.

Rai
13-10-10, 13:03
^ I know right? Where's the Welsh, Liverpool, Southern counties...and so on? Mind you, she could be there a long time doing them all:vlol:. I guess she chose the more recognisable ones (to outside the UK).

Trigger_happy
13-10-10, 13:27
I guess she chose the more recognisable ones (to outside the UK).

I only recognise them as they're then ones Americans do on telly- like exactly that. I think she's just copying the telly.

toxicraider
13-10-10, 14:36
In the US, "soda", "pop", and "coke" are all names for soft drinks like Pepsi, Fanta, etc. Living in Nebraska, I've always called it "pop", so when I went to the South a couple summers back it was weird because all pop is referred to as "coke". A waitress asked me, "Do you want a coke?" And I said, "Yes please." Then she said, "Which kind?" :p

And apparently "lemonade" has different meanings around the world as well:



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lemonade
Buh buh buh, Coke is from Coca Cola, which is a specific drink. :(

In the UK, we use the word Coke for Cola (specifically Coca Cola), I thought Soda was generally implied to mean lemonade (which is usually sweet) but you don't hear that word much here, apart from in 'Ice-cream soda'.
We use refer to fizzy drinks in general by 'fizzy drinks', 'fizzy pop', or 'soft drinks' (although not all soft drinks are carbonated).

I would be very confused if I asked for a Coke, and had the waiter ask me which kind. :vlol:


As for those different types of Lemonade, they have the same meaning (in the UK), but are just different style of drink. Lemonade usually implies the 'clear' lemonade that comes in cans (like Sprite), but there is also Cloudy Lemonade which tastes pretty much the same, just a lot less sweet. It's just a less sugary style of the same drink.

Rai
13-10-10, 14:57
I only recognise them as they're then ones Americans do on telly- like exactly that. I think she's just copying the telly.

You could be right, these are certainly more exaggerated forms as seen on TV. Is the first accent she does her normal voice, I wonder.

Solice
14-10-10, 04:26
Her Australian was way too forced and over-the-top, certainly for someone pretending to be from Sydney. Yeuch. But otherwise, impressive!

"I was born in London, weren't I." :vlol: I love that accent the most. Silly chavs :p

I have heard that term before, 'chavs'. Is that a British term for a 'redneck' or 'd-bag'?

Trigger_happy
14-10-10, 10:02
I have heard that term before, 'chavs'. Is that a British term for a 'redneck' or 'd-bag'?

Not really. Chavs are normally tracksuit wearing thickies who have too much spare time on their hands, despite having like 9 children, and they spend that time being a pain in the arse.

Solice
15-10-10, 02:03
Not really. Chavs are normally tracksuit wearing thickies who have too much spare time on their hands, despite having like 9 children, and they spend that time being a pain in the arse.

I see, proletariat trash. The same crowed that dressed as punk rockers in the 70's and 80's.

Squibbly
15-10-10, 02:25
Its a pity- she's so good at accents, but goes straight for cockney guv'nor and the Queen. There are a few more accents in the UK then those two.

She's good but... CANADIANS DON'T SOUND LIKE THAT. God. Drives me insane. It's the most annoying stereotype. :hea:

Trigger_happy
15-10-10, 15:56
^So really she's good at copying what American telly thinks we all sound like?

Ivo
15-10-10, 15:59
US English: "-or" ("flavor")
British English: "-our" ("flavour")

:yah:

herothing
15-10-10, 16:19
I hate stereotypical immitations of the English accent, they drive me crazy.

toxicraider
15-10-10, 19:17
You could be right, these are certainly more exaggerated forms as seen on TV. Is the first accent she does her normal voice, I wonder.
I'm not sure, I don't think she is either. :p
VJyTA4VlZus
She starts with an American accent, then has a convincing British accent (which doesn't sound like any of the ones from her video), then goes back to American, then through various. Apparently she lives in Philadelphia, but is from Seattle, mentioned in one of the videos on her site.
http://www.amywalkeronline.com/Amy_Walker_Online/Press.html

Solice
20-10-10, 04:04
Here is one I found after reading the Mary Bale story...

England: wheelie bin

US: (Wheeled) Trash Bin, Rollout Container

freeze10108
20-10-10, 05:14
US: (Wheeled) Trash Bin, Rollout Container

Though I can't attest to the entirety of the United States, we usually say "trash can." :)

snork
20-10-10, 06:32
You're from Kent, so ... of course you're posh! ;)
lol

Well im used to this from having a American bf :p We used to rant about words though. I get annoyed by some words like "leever"/"lever" i prefer our way but i prefer the Americans pronunciation of Tomatoe :D I tend to say alot of American/English and Scottish words so it doesnt bother me :whi:I think being around people from different places opens you up to different words/accents/languages :D
Dan Quayle ? :pi: