PDA

View Full Version : 19 Iconic Products That America Doesn't Make Anymore


voltz
06-11-10, 21:08
Another American icon has bit the dust: Pontiac.

GM is canceling the 84-year-old brand after winding down production over the past few years. Like other American automakers, it is restructuring and rebranding to compete with foreign companies.

Pontiac joins a long list of iconic products that aren't made anywhere in America.

Meanwhile, plenty of beer is still made here, but many of America’s most-iconic beer brands, including Miller, Coors, and Budweiser, are owned by foreign companies. In 2008, Anheuser-Busch, the St. Louis-based company that has a nearly 50 percent market share in the U.S., was sold to InBev, a Belgium-based conglomerate run by Brazilian executives. In the accompanying video, Julie McIntosh, author of Dethroning the King: The Hostile Takeover of Anheuser-Busch, an American Icon, discusses the deal with Yahoo! Finance economics editor Daniel Gross.

Here are 19 Iconic Products That America Doesn't Make Anymore:

Rawlings baseballs

Last production date: 1969

Rawlings is the official supplier of baseballs to Major League Baseball. The St. Louis shop was founded in 1887 by George and Alfred Rawlings. In 1969 the brothers moved the baseball-manufacturing plant from Puerto Rico to Haiti and then later to Costa Rica.

Gerber baby food

Last production date: 1994

Gerber was founded in Michigan in 1927 by the owner of the Fremont Canning Company. The brand grew in popularity and in 1994 merged with Novartis, a Swiss pharmaceutical company. Then in 2007, Gerber was bought by Switzerland's Nestle, the world's largest food company. Today the brand has more than 80% of the American baby food market and the largest supplier of baby products in the world.

Ever since the merger with Novartis, all Gerber products have been manufactured overseas.

Etch a Sketch

Last production date: 2000

Etch A Sketch, an iconic American toy since the 1960s, used to be produced in Bryan, Ohio, a small town of 8,000. Then in Dec. 2000, toymaker Ohio Art decided to move production to Shenzhen, China.

Converse shoes

Last production date: 2001

Marquis M. Converse opened Converse Rubber Show Company in Massachusetts in 1908. Chuck Taylors– named after All American high school basketball player Chuck Taylor– began selling in 1918 as the show eventually produced an industry record of over 550 million pairs by 1997. But in 2001 sales were on the decline and the U.S. factory closed. Now Chuck Taylors are made in Indonesia.

Stainless steel rebar

Last production date: circa 2001

Many forms of this basic steel product are not available domestically. Multiple waivers to the Buy America Act have allowed purchase of rebar internationally.

Note: The Buy America Act requires government mass transportation spending to use American products.

Dress shirts*

Last production date: Oct. 2002

The last major shirt factory in America closed in October 2002, according to NYT. C.F. Hathaway's Maine factory had been producing shirts since 1837.

*We know there are other shirt manufacturers in America. They do not produce in large quantities or supply major brands.

Mattel toys

Last production date: 2002

The largest toy company in the world closed their last American factory in 2002. Mattel, headquartered in California, produces 65 percent of their products in China as of August 2007.

Minivans

Last production date: circa 2003

A waiver to the Buy America Act permitted an American producer of wheel-chair accessible minivans to purchase Canadian chassis for use in government contracts, because no chassis were available from the United States. The waiver specified: "General Motors and Chrysler minivan chassis, including those used on the Chevrolet Uplander, Pontiac Montana, Buick Terraza, Saturn Relay, Chrysler Town & Country, and Dodge Grand Caravan, are no longer manufactured in the United States."

Note: The Buy America Act requires government mass transportation spending to use American products.

Vending machines

Last production date: circa 2003

You know that thing you put bills into on a vending machine? It isn’t made in America, according to a waiver to the Buy America Act.

Neither is the coin dispenser, according to this federal waiver.

Note: The Buy America Act requires government mass transportation spending to use American products.

Levi jeans

Last production date: Dec. 2003

Levi Strauss & Co. shut down all its American operations and outsourced production to Latin America and Asia in Dec. 2003. The company's denim products have been an iconic American product for 150 years.

Radio Flyer's Red Wagon

Last production date: March 2004

The little red wagon has been an iconic image of America for years. But once Radio Flyer decided its Chicago plant was too expensive, it began producing most products, including the red wagon, in China.

Televisions

Last production date: Oct. 2004

Five Rivers Electronic Innovations was the last American owned TV color maker in the US. The Tennessee company used LCoS (liquid crystal on silicon) technology to produce televisions for Philips Electronics. But after Philips decided to stop selling TVs with LCoS, Five Rivers eventually filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in Oct. 2004. As part of its reorganization plan, the company stopped manufacturing TVs.

Now there are ZERO televisions made in America, according to Business Week.

Cell phones

Last production date: circa 2007

Of the 1.2 billion cell phones sold worldwide in 2008, NOT ONE was made in America, according to Manufacturing & Technology publisher Richard McCormick.

After studying the websites of cell phone companies, we could not identify a single phone that was not manufactured primarily overseas.

Railroads (parts including manganese turnout castings, U69 guard bars, LV braces and weld kits)

Last production date: circa 2008

Here's another standout from dozens of waivers to the Buy America Act: railroad turnouts and weld kits.

Manganese turnout castings are used to widen railroad tracks, and they were used to build our once-great railroad system. U69 guard bars, LV braces and Weld Kits, along with 22 mm Industrial steel chain are basic items that were certifiably not available in the US.

Note: The Buy America Act requires government mass transportation spending to use American products.

Dell computers

Last production date: Jan. 2010

In January 2010, Dell closed its North Carolina PC factory, its last large U.S. plant. Analysts said Dell would be outsourcing work to Asian manufacturers in an attempt to catch up with the rest of the industry, said analyst Ashok Kumar.

Canned sardines

Last production date: April 2010

Stinson Seafood plant, the last sardine cannery in Maine and the U.S., shut down in April. The first U.S. sardine cannery opened in Maine in 1875, but since the demand for the small, oily fish declined, more canneries closed shop.

Pontiac cars

Last production date: May 2010

The last Pontiac was produced last May. The brand was formally killed on Halloween, as GM contracts Pontiac dealerships expired.

The 84-year-old GM brand was famous for muscle cars.

Forks, spoons, and knives

Last production date: June 2010

The last flatware factory in the US closed last summer. Sherrill Manufacturing bought Oneida Ltd. in 2005, but shut down its fork & knife operations due to the tough economy. CEO Greg Owens says his company may resume production "when the general economic climate improves and as Sherrill Manufacturing is able to put itself back on its feet and recapitalize and regroup."

Incandescent light bulb

Last production date: Sept. 2010

The incandescent light bulb (invented by Thomas Edison) has been phased out.

Our last major factory that made incandescent light bulbs closed in September 2010. In 2007, Congress passed a measure that will ban incandescents by 2014, prompting GE to close its domestic factory.

Note: A reader pointed out that the Osram/Sylvania Plant in St. Mary's, Penn. is still producing light bulbs to fill old and international contracts. However, the plant has announced plans to wind down incandescent production.

http://finance.yahoo.com/tech-ticker/19-iconic-products-that-america-doesn%27t-make-anymore-535569.html?tickers=f,ge,mat,DELL,MOT,aapl,bni

All of which is depressing at the very least.

trlestew
06-11-10, 21:10
I'm using a Dell PC made by America right now.


I don't know whether I should be proud or downright annoyed.

voltz
06-11-10, 21:12
I read Jan 10. So I'm guessing your's was just prior to that?

Bongo Fury
06-11-10, 21:58
"a giant sucking sound" i believe Ross Perot referred to it as..

anyways, it's the same deal here in Canada - manufacturing is pretty much dead.

voltz
06-11-10, 22:10
At one point I was able to catch this documentary about a group of women who worked at a sweat shop in china where they were given housing, meals, etc, but all of what little they made was going right back to that company while spending most of their time (including livelihood) working. If this is what Levi's has resorted to, then I'm finding that a solid reason why they should be boycotted.

Also I can't even see how anyone can stomach Gerber from another country outside of american soil.

trlestew
06-11-10, 22:14
I read Jan 10. So I'm guessing your's was just prior to that?

June 2006...yes.

Lara's Nemesis
06-11-10, 23:22
I didn't know they had stopped making Converse, I used to love the baseball boots.

Ah I see now, I didn't read it right. You can still get them, they just don't make them in the US anymore.:(

We had a Levi factory in my hometown in Scotland, was a big blow for the area when it shut down. I'm sure it was almost all women that worked there as well.

Sgt BOMBULOUS
06-11-10, 23:37
So what country do you suppose you'd buy a Nuclear Reactor from? A fighter Jet? A gigantic mining dump truck? A 400 HP John Deere Tractor? The United States has gone high-tech, and allowed other countries to manufacture rudimentary odds & ends because we can... And because it's to our advantage to do so. Anyone who says we make NOTHING here is just too lazy to go on the internet and find out what we do make and export, because there's plenty to choose from. We're still a huge exporter, it's just not the low tech cheapo stuff anymore.

Love2Raid
06-11-10, 23:51
Well that's where all your jobs went people!

They took 'r jerbs! >_<

Bongo Fury
07-11-10, 00:00
So what country do you suppose you'd buy a Nuclear Reactor from? A fighter Jet? A gigantic mining dump truck? A 400 HP John Deere Tractor? The United States has gone high-tech, and allowed other countries to manufacture rudimentary odds & ends because we can... And because it's to our advantage to do so. Anyone who says we make NOTHING here is just too lazy to go on the internet and find out what we do make and export, because there's plenty to choose from. We're still a huge exporter, it's just not the low tech cheapo stuff anymore.

what's that all adding up to - about 2%GDP annual growth? you could use a few factories making pots & pans and a few other things to pick up the slack i would think.

Chocola teapot
07-11-10, 00:08
American't.

http://i54.************/2qt9szo.png

Only Joking <3 xxx

scoopy_loopy
07-11-10, 00:16
It's happening all over the world. :(

Cochrane
07-11-10, 00:40
So what country do you suppose you'd buy a Nuclear Reactor from? A fighter Jet? A gigantic mining dump truck? A 400 HP John Deere Tractor? The United States has gone high-tech, and allowed other countries to manufacture rudimentary odds & ends because we can... And because it's to our advantage to do so. Anyone who says we make NOTHING here is just too lazy to go on the internet and find out what we do make and export, because there's plenty to choose from. We're still a huge exporter, it's just not the low tech cheapo stuff anymore.

True, and the same applies to many other countries (e.g. Germany). That does not mean this is not a problem, though. People who previously worked stitching T-Shirts together cannot easily be retrained to suddenly build fighter jets. And the easy jobs in the high tech area are being or have been replaced to a large degree with industrial robots. This is a huge social problem, and parts of the US will suffer greatly from this.

patriots88888
07-11-10, 04:26
It was evident a decade ago that the US was slowly moving away from manufacturing to the service sector of business. You are much better off getting an education that can be applied accordingly... teaching, social worker, medical, etc...

lunavixen
07-11-10, 04:34
well, at least we can still get things that are australian made and owned in australia, but we've also lost one of our most major AO products, Golden Circle, got sold in july i think

scoopy_loopy
07-11-10, 08:59
^
Yeah, we've lost tonnes to foreign markets. Especially America. :( GM took Holden, for example, not even Vegemite is truly Australian anymore.

Legend 4ever
07-11-10, 10:27
So it's not that the products are not made anymore, it's that they are made/assembled out of US. Who cares? Of course they're gonna ship stuff to Asia, where there's cheap work force. That's logical and has been happening for decades.

Goose
07-11-10, 11:34
then I'm finding that a solid reason why they should be boycotted.


Why? America is asking China to increase the value of its currency, meaning its workers will actually be paid more and can afford more, and will work less.

Boycotting a company that uses chinese labour will only put chinese workers out of a job, and there home as you rightly added, untill some burmese or russian company opens up shop and they go back to work in the exact same conditions.

Supporting the strength of the chinese economy however would give these people more. Yes, its wrong for china to treat its workers this way, but people boycotting things will only make these workers lives hell, because china always has other people to cater for.

digitizedboy
07-11-10, 11:58
haha I used to love Etch a Sketch... I could make some masterpieces on that thing.

Lara Croft!
07-11-10, 12:32
The cheap workforce in China, Indonesia etc isn't going to take advantage of itself. American companies had to step up. :rolleyes:

FloTheMachine
07-11-10, 14:34
Etch a Sketch was brilliant :(

BlueJ97
07-11-10, 14:38
OMG NOOOOOOOO :(
Converse shoes !!!

Love2Raid
07-11-10, 14:44
OMG NOOOOOOOO :(
Converse shoes !!!
No, don´t worry! They are still being made, just not in America. :D
What would I do without my favourite trainers? :eek:

FloTheMachine
07-11-10, 14:47
I would die a horrible death without converse... :( Thank god...

Last Hope
07-11-10, 15:47
The article now's on Yahoo! but the title mеntions 18 products instead of 19. Funny.

http://i55.************/kef1vp.jpg

Alpharaider47
07-11-10, 18:16
I'm still waiting for the day when US flags are no longer made here. I understand that maybe we make all sorts of hi tech crap and such, but that's not really what I'm interested in. I can't go buy a Jet, or a 787, or a Nuclear Reactor :p You can't exactly feel proud walking into a store and seeing rows and rows of Chinese crap without a single home made product. Even if we make a lot of stuff, how is the average person supposed to know that when they can't find any of it? The majority of what I own was produced in foreign countries (not that I complain, I rather like that :p) but I can't name a single thing I own right now that was made here in the States aside from my Ford Explorer, and even that I'm suspicious of :p

Love2Raid
07-11-10, 18:23
Regarding the flag, I think that already is the case. :p
I saw a report about this one day in the news (a long time ago).

Alpharaider47
07-11-10, 18:32
Regarding the flag, I think that already is the case. :p
I saw a report about this one day in the news (a long time ago).

I swear I think I've seen a few, but I imagine everyone would deny it just to save face or something. I just think the whole situation is rather sad. I like things from other countries, I really do. I have a bunch of things that my parents collected from overseas that they've given me. I just don't want everything I own to come from China :o

Cochrane
07-11-10, 18:34
I'm still waiting for the day when US flags are no longer made here. I understand that maybe we make all sorts of hi tech crap and such, but that's not really what I'm interested in. I can't go buy a Jet, or a 787, or a Nuclear Reactor :p You can't exactly feel proud walking into a store and seeing rows and rows of Chinese crap without a single home made product. Even if we make a lot of stuff, how is the average person supposed to know that when they can't find any of it? The majority of what I own was produced in foreign countries (not that I complain, I rather like that :p) but I can't name a single thing I own right now that was made here in the States aside from my Ford Explorer, and even that I'm suspicious of :p

Look at your computer and the software running on it. The actual hardware and discs may have been assembled elsewhere, but the entire logic, the intellect behind it, that is all predominantly american. That’s the kind of thing you might want to look for.

There is nothing great or honorable about screwing things together following a blueprint. Anyone can do that. The part that is interesting and, if you want to, also the part to feel proud of, is always the design, research and development. Nobody remembers the great assemblers of days past. The great inventors, though? We all know them. And the US, or in fact the entire western world, still have quite a few of them.

the ancient
07-11-10, 18:49
No, don´t worry! They are still being made, just not in America. :D
What would I do without my favourite trainers? :eek:

I would have the same problems =/

Alpharaider47
07-11-10, 18:50
^^ I just want a little sticker on the bottom that says "Made in the USA" I don't wanna have to look for it. :p That's what I'm getting at. I'm not saying that the US doesn't make anything, I'm saying that when you look in a store it just doesn't seem like it anymore. To me at least.

Laurencarter
09-11-10, 20:07
I can honestly tell you that I have no idea which products I use every day are made in my own country. From now on I'll start to pay more attention to the "made in ..." label.