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LaraCablara
15-11-10, 03:04
Yeah so my exciting year of trying new things like surviving a piano class and working in McDonalds and telemarketing places continues :o

This time I joined a swim team, but I'm not exactly an amazing swimmer :p.

My biggest problem is when I do the swimming properly (like in freestyle), I do not move anywhere, and of course I can breathe underwater for like 2 seconds only.

So any advice on swimming well? Like breathing and what forms are which? You guys were a big help with piano :D.

digitizedboy
15-11-10, 03:33
shout shark!

Rachel Croft
15-11-10, 03:48
I did swim team for a while :) I had been swimming my whole life though, not sure how long you've been doing it.

The sport is all about endurance, and building your lungs up to the point where they can hold a sufficient amount of oxygen.

If you'd like to increase your lung capacity, hold your breath for a whole minute, (or as long as you can) and then come back up for a breather for another whole minute.
This helps your lungs to expell any carbon dioxide, and helps to increase oxygen capacity.

But other than that, just keep practicing, until you get faster and can endure longer.
And another tip: If you have issues breathing on just one side while doing freestyle, MAKE SURE you train yourself to breathe on both sides, or else you will screw up you alignment, like I did.
With freestyle, also stretch your arms out as far as you can in front of you, but in a smoothe, rythmic way with your hangs pointed. With your feet, do small, but fast kicks, and you'll surely speed up.
Until it's all automatic, you need to think about those things until it all feels balanced.


Good luck!

Alpharaider47
15-11-10, 04:00
Hehe I can't offer the best advice I don't think(learned how to swim when my best friend's dad threw me in the deep end- I kid you not) However, practice makes perfect. Spend time in the water, try to practice different movements. You might ask your team for some pointers as well, I'm sure they'd be willing to help :) Rachel Croft's got some good tips too :p

I was sort of self taught, kind of sink or swim(no pun intended) and through being in the water enough and watching other people I was able to mimic their movements well enough to start swimming. Then as I kept up with it, they became more streamlined and now I'm a halfway decent swimmer. Just don't give up no matter what happens :)

cezy rockeru
15-11-10, 05:30
practice:wve:

sandygrimm
15-11-10, 05:39
Swimm till you pass out! :p

scoopy_loopy
15-11-10, 07:26
As an Australian, I always feel really weird to encounter foreigners who can't swim (or, well enough). Here it's a part of growing up (my primary school used to bus us out each summer for lessons, most highschools have pools of their own and will also teach swimming as part of PE)... so I really don't know what to say -- I guess adult swim lessons must exist. Maybe try that? Otherwise, just start practicing a few times a week (if not everyday) on your own, eventually, you'll just get it.


Also look up techniques online? There must be something wrong with your style, technically, if you feel you aren't moving. Also, with freestyle, always keep your legs straight at the knees, and reach as far as you possibly can for each stroke - try to "scoop" the water with each hand as well. Good luck! :D



Edit: Oh and you also asked about the styles... Well you already seem to know freestyle, breaststroke is the one where you swim like classic Lara does under water :p, Butterfly is the stroke where you kick like a dolphin and swing your arms in-sync in wide cycles (like a steamboat! :D), backstroke is basically freestyle on your back. Hope that helps.

Necromanser
15-11-10, 08:09
Yeah so my exciting year of trying new things like surviving a piano class and working in McDonalds and telemarketing places continues :o

This time I joined a swim team, but I'm not exactly an amazing swimmer :p.

My biggest problem is when I do the swimming properly (like in freestyle), I do not move anywhere, and of course I can breathe underwater for like 2 seconds only.

So any advice on swimming well? Like breathing and what forms are which? You guys were a big help with piano :D.
Well it's all about muscle memory,so you gotta practice a lot. You'd be surprised how much difference proper technique will make.

If you have the time then train about 3-4 times a week focusing on different strokes every training.Used to do something similar to this when it came down to freestyle:

200m( Any stroke)
400m( Kicking)
400m( Practice stroke, use buoy to stop yourself kicking)
800m Freestyle
400m IM
50mx4 Sprints
200m Warmdown

Thats an average swimming workout( used to do 3-4km every training before the season started)

Also invest in a good pair of goggles :p, it's annoying when you gotta wipe them because they fogged.

Since you've just started out focus on freestyle and breastroke and do about 1km of swimming every session. Do a warm-up, kicking-drills, hand-drills and do the actual stroke and then warm down(200m warm-up, 200m kicking, 200m hand-drills,300m freestyle, 100m warm down)

Hope I've helped :)

Mikky
15-11-10, 12:11
No, because I can't swim. :pi: Maybe one of you could give me advice. :whi:

Encore
15-11-10, 14:38
Unfortunately I too spent my whole childhood knowing only the very basics of swimming, so when I decided to start training it for real a couple of years ago it was quite challenging. It still is... I can only afford 2 times a week training (used to have classes but no more), so it's hard improving my endurance.

The only tip I can offer is to have a teacher (or an experienced friend) with you for at least some months. They can look at you while you are swimming, and help correct your posture right there and then, which I find is the most problematic thing when you're learning. The correct position and direction of arms and legs is fundamental in all swimming styles, and when you're in the water it can be hard for you to know if you're doing it right or wrong. Having someone watching from the outside and telling you how to move does wonders.


Since you've just started out focus on freestyle and breastroke and do about 1km of swimming every session. Do a warm-up, kicking-drills, hand-drills and do the actual stroke and then warm down(200m warm-up, 200m kicking, 200m hand-drills,300m freestyle, 100m warm down)


...what?.. What are kicking drills and hand drills? What's the difference between warm up and warm down?... :confused:

IceColdLaraCroft
15-11-10, 22:41
http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_2UbyQb8LCFk/Sn5F_a-v-1I/AAAAAAAAAvE/sK20kdfYQK4/s320/swimming.gif

Necromanser
16-11-10, 01:29
Unfortunately I too spent my whole childhood knowing only the very basics of swimming, so when I decided to start training it for real a couple of years ago it was quite challenging. It still is... I can only afford 2 times a week training (used to have classes but no more), so it's hard improving my endurance.

The only tip I can offer is to have a teacher (or an experienced friend) with you for at least some months. They can look at you while you are swimming, and help correct your posture right there and then, which I find is the most problematic thing when you're learning. The correct position and direction of arms and legs is fundamental in all swimming styles, and when you're in the water it can be hard for you to know if you're doing it right or wrong. Having someone watching from the outside and telling you how to move does wonders.




...what?.. What are kicking drills and hand drills? What's the difference between warm up and warm down?... :confused:
When you do kicking-drills you hold the board and do the kicking for whichever stroke you're doing. It helps you focus on doing it correctly. It's basically stroke correction. If you do enough of the kicking correctly next time when you do the stroke you will just do it automatically due to muscle memory.

Hand-drills are the same thing but it's when you put a buoy between your feet to stop kicking. This is when you can focus on your breathing technique( such as breathing on alternate sides during freestyle) and the hands.

Might be a bit ambiguous :p, never was good at explaining.

Warm-ups help you stretch all your muscles and get em going and prevent some types of injury. Warming down helps you to get your heart rate down gradually.

I'm sure there are more benefits but those are the ones I know of.

SpongeBob Lover
16-11-10, 01:31
This always helped me:
GLIDE with the water, never FIGHT with the water. :)