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Sifo-Dyas
07-05-11, 09:59
Hey

I have started the impossible task of writing a film script (with the intention of actually sending it to Hollywood - one must never stop dreaming, right? lol) but every now and then I run into a particular way of saying things in English - enter the English proverb! :D

Can anyone guide me towards an internet site which translates Dutch sayings into English ones - or perhaps help me this instant with 1 particular one, please?

In Dutch we have a saying that goes (litteraly translated of course) like this:
Her words weren't cold yet
This means that someone just said something and her words are immediately followed by an event - thus saying :"she had only just spoken and something else happened immediately after it".

Does anyone know the English equivalent of this, please? I'm sure it's a bit different - perhaps something like her words had only just escaped her mouth or her words were still warm ...

Many, many thanks!

Bye for now

Apathetic
07-05-11, 10:30
There could be many different ways of saying it, but one word comes to mind here: Subsequent

sub·se·quent/ˈsəbsəkwənt/Adjective
1. Coming after something in time; following.

She had only spoken when (an event) had subsequented. (There's more than one way of phrasing it, this is a pretty weak way considering I'm not refering to anything in particular, just as an example)

I could be wrong, though. :wve:

I don't think there is an actual equivelent to "her words had only just escaped her mouth or her words were still warm", but english is one of the most diverse languages in the world, you can probably make something up that would be just as meaningful.

jackali
07-05-11, 10:42
As Apathetic also said... I'm not certain there's a direct English equivalent.

I'd go with something like: 'The words had scarcely left her lips when...'

Apathetic
07-05-11, 10:45
I'd go with something like: 'The words had scarcely left her lips when...'

I agree with this. :)

xXhayleyroxXx
07-05-11, 12:53
Yeah, what jackali said ~ and if the character/actor were to be speaking of someone else and they suddenly turned up its 'speak of the devil, and he shall come'.

Dennis's Mom
07-05-11, 14:02
As Apathetic also said... I'm not certain there's a direct English equivalent.

I'd go with something like: 'The words had scarcely left her lips when...'

Agreed.

Minty Mouth
07-05-11, 14:09
If you're writing a screenplay I'm not sure you want anything like that, anyway.

SPEAKER: Dialogue--

(Thunder strikes)

SPEAKER: Yikes!

You don't really need much detail in the stage directions. The fact that the action (in thic case, thunder) comes without anything else inbetween it and the dialogue implies that it happens straight away anyway. The added dash at the end of the dialogue implies interruption, which can intensify the effect.

Unless you were talking about using the phrase within some dialogue, in which case I would be even more careful, especially with the word subsequent, since it's not a word with a place in common vocabulary.

!Lara Croft!
07-05-11, 14:36
Yeah, what jackali said ~ and if the character/actor were to be speaking of someone else and they suddenly turned up its 'speak of the devil, and he shall come'.

Which has been further shortened to just "Speak of the Devil..."

Dennis's Mom
07-05-11, 15:00
There is something people say about "jinxing" things. You say something about an outcome and the opposite happens, people say you've jinxed something.

"What a good little boy!"

*boy throws fit*

"Way to jinx the kid, Sue!"

scoopy_loopy
07-05-11, 15:15
Maybe: "Her words had barely left her mouth [preposition] ..."
I can't think of an actual "saying" for this situation. Which is strange, English has something for everything else! :vlol:

EDIT: Oh, I just saw Jackali has basically said this already. :o

As Apathetic also said... I'm not certain there's a direct English equivalent.

I'd go with something like: 'The words had scarcely left her lips when...'

Sifo-Dyas
07-05-11, 18:45
If you're writing a screenplay I'm not sure you want anything like that, anyway.

SPEAKER: Dialogue--

(Thunder strikes)

SPEAKER: Yikes!

You don't really need much detail in the stage directions. The fact that the action (in thic case, thunder) comes without anything else inbetween it and the dialogue implies that it happens straight away anyway. The added dash at the end of the dialogue implies interruption, which can intensify the effect.


You know, this is actually very helpful. Are you in any way, shape or form a screenwriter? Funny thing is that you mentioned 'thunder strikes' and her words are actually followed by the thunderous sound of an earthquake, lol. :D
How about that? :)

let me just clarify the scene I'm currently writing:

All 3 of them head home when we suddenly hear a DEEP, THUNDEROUS sound.

LUCAS
Wow – did you hear that?!

SASHA
(looking up to the sky, not in the least bit worried)
Yep, and if we don’t hurry home – we’re gonna get awfully wet.

So you see that it's important that Sasha says her entire sentence BEFORE the next thunderous sound (this time accompanied by an earthquake) occurs. Why? Well, the next line Lucas is saying should be something like: 'You still think it's the rain?'

and so on ... and so on ... :)