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View Full Version : What if you were born somewhere else?


miss.haggard
19-05-11, 23:36
Ifitweremyhome.com (http://www.ifitweremyhome.com/) helps you see what would happen if you were born in another country.

The lottery of birth is responsible for much of who we are. If you were not born in the country you were, what would your life be like? Would you be the same person?

It automatically compares a country to the US but if you go here (http://www.ifitweremyhome.com/compare/listing) and choose the country you live in, then you can switch the USA for something else.

Just kinda fun. :) :wve:

Mad Tony
19-05-11, 23:43
Really interesting website. That's going straight in my bookmarks folder. :tmb:

Tombraiderx08
19-05-11, 23:53
If I lived in Germany...hmm
consume 50.33% less oil
use 46.72% less electricity
have 40.64% less babies
experience 40% less of a class divide
have 35.67% less chance of dying in infancy
make 26.51% less money
have 25.21% more free time
spend 48.43% less money on health care
have 11.83% more chance at being employed
be 83.33% less likely to have HIV/AIDS
live 1.17 years longer

Lara Croft!
20-05-11, 00:06
Very interesting, thank you so much for sharing.

Sir Croft
20-05-11, 00:44
Very interesting, indeed! I've always wondered what would my life be like if I were born somewhere else!

Quasimodo
20-05-11, 00:46
Seems like every country I compared to the US had significantly fewer cases of AIDS. I wonder what accounts for that? *off to Google*

Snazabaz
20-05-11, 00:52
Cool find! It was really interesting to read, thanks!

MattTR
20-05-11, 01:01
I read this "what if you were born this way"? :vlol:

Anyways, that's interesting stuff! :D

Sir Croft
20-05-11, 01:03
I don't get how spending less money on health care is considered a plus, though, specially when the websites states that...

"This entry contains the per capita public and private health expenditure at purchase power parity using US Dollars. This figure combines government, personal, and employer spending on health care"


Shouldn't the bigger amount of money spent by the bolded parts be considered as a positive rather than a negative?

leglion
20-05-11, 01:12
I don't get how spending less money on health care is considered a plus, though, specially when the websites states that...

"This entry contains the per capita public and private health expenditure at purchase power parity using US Dollars. This figure combines government, personal, and employer spending on health care"


Shouldn't the bigger amount of money spent by the bolded parts be considered as a positive rather than a negative?

Plus they don't take the informal market into account...

soulmate_me
20-05-11, 01:31
such a great website, thanks for sharing...off to add to my bookmarks!

Mad Tony
20-05-11, 09:35
I don't get how spending less money on health care is considered a plus, though, specially when the websites states that...

"This entry contains the per capita public and private health expenditure at purchase power parity using US Dollars. This figure combines government, personal, and employer spending on health care"


Shouldn't the bigger amount of money spent by the bolded parts be considered as a positive rather than a negative?Not always. Not everyone see high-government spending as a good thing.

With regards to health-care, I assumed it meant how much is spent per capita.

StefanJ94
20-05-11, 10:06
so if I was born in UK...

consume 4.1 times more oil
make 3.9 times more money
spend 4.5 times more money on health care
have 74.76% more chance at being employed
use 49.95% more electricity
have 45.43% less chance of dying in infancy
live 4.24 years longer
experience 12.82% less of a class divide
have 10.49% less babies
be 2 times more likely to have HIV/AIDS

not too bad :D

Forwen
20-05-11, 11:17
Huh, I thought Argentina was richer than or at least on par with Poland.

Encore
20-05-11, 11:20
I made lots of comparisons and was rather surprised to see the differences in unemployment are often not what I expected.

The most shocking comparison was this.

http://i51.************/1z70a5l.jpg

Yes, Portugal. Not exactly the most advanced country, in fact one of the worst in Europe. But somehow the USA is even worst and doesn't get as much crap as we do (ie, IMF intervention).

Then again, quality of life standards aren't important to financial institutions.

sandygrimm
20-05-11, 13:32
Very interesting, I thought we were worse off here, but in the pay domain seems to be Direct proportional :p

Mad Tony
20-05-11, 13:42
Yes, Portugal. Not exactly the most advanced country, in fact one of the worst in Europe. But somehow the USA is even worst and doesn't get as much crap as we do (ie, IMF intervention).

Then again, quality of life standards aren't important to financial institutions.That's to do with debt and the country's ability to pay it I believe.

Cali
20-05-11, 19:23
Wow that's really interesting. I'm comparing loads of places right now...
It's making me wish I was born in Australia like some of my family ='(

Squibbly
20-05-11, 19:37
Interesting!

http://i819.photobucket.com/albums/zz117/Squibbly/Random%20junk/07662205.png

Trying out a bunch of different countries.

miss.haggard
20-05-11, 19:40
^ Wow! More of a chance of dying in infancy? Crazy! The HIV/AIDS statistics are really surprising too! Glad you all are enjoying this!

Squibbly
20-05-11, 19:47
^ Wow! More of a chance of dying in infancy? Crazy!

Maybe it has something to do with the free health care here.

This is fun. :D

Wow, Australia seems like a great place to live. They are better than here for everything.

Encore
20-05-11, 22:58
That's to do with debt and the country's ability to pay it I believe.

Which is why I added


Then again, quality of life standards aren't important to financial institutions.

Simochka
21-05-11, 11:24
If The United States were your home instead of Sweden you would...

Have 2.2 times higher chance of dying in infancy
experience 95.65% more of a class divide
consume 95.65% more oil
spend 2.1 times more money on health care
be 6 times more likely to have HIV/AIDS
have 36.39% more babies
make 26.09% more money
use 15.78% less electricity
die 2.73 years sooner

If The United Kingdom were your home instead of Sweden you would...

have 74.45% more chance of dying in infancy
use 61.93% less electricity
experience 47.83% more of a class divide
consume 28.03% less oil
have 13.98% more chance at being employed
be 2 times more likely to have HIV/AIDS
die 1.81 years sooner
spend 10.97% less money on health care
have 5.23% more babies
make 4.35% less money
This website is pretty cool :p

aidanmalone
21-05-11, 11:35
If i lived in the US instead of the UK

consume 2.3 times more oil (red)
use 2.2 times more electricity (red)
spend 2.4 times more money on health care (red)
experience 32.35% more of a class divide (red)
make 31.82% more money (green)
have 29.62% more babies (blue)
have 28.45% more chance of dying in infancy (red)
be 3 times more likely to have HIV/AIDS (red)
have 16.25% more chance of being unemployed (red)
work 9.71% more hours each year (red)
die 0.92 years sooner (red)
Would you rather live in the United States? No
:vlol: I love this website

RoxasKennedy
21-05-11, 11:40
XD

If Japan were your home instead of Croatia you would...

make 85.23% more money
use 81.93% more electricity
have 65.22% more chance at being employed
consume 61.25% more oil
spend 2.2 times more money on health care
have 55.43% less chance of dying in infancy
live 6.59 years longer
experience 31.38% more of a class divide
have 23.05% less babies

f*** this, Imma go to Japan:p

Mad Tony
21-05-11, 11:41
Which is why I addedYes, I saw that, but I don't think quality of life has anything to do with financial institutions anyway.

To the people saying Australia is nice - it is a lovely place (I've been there three times before), but I don't think you should judge a country based on just these statistics. Go out there as well. I really like Australia but would still rather live here in the UK despite the fact that the UK's statistics are probably worse for most things. There's more to life than just statistics.

I don't think it's possible to say if you'd rather live somewhere just by looking at statistics.

Pietras
21-05-11, 11:55
Huh, I thought Argentina was richer than or at least on par with Poland.
No, they had über-crisis a decade ago. They've recovered and are developing very nicely, but we're richer.

Anyway, it's a fun little thing but not very realistic. Especially comparing big and small countries is not easy. Countries with large population will always have much bigger class divide, it's only natural. Then we have oil-inflated countries. Then we have national health care systems that may be free yet über-crap at the same time which makes people pay for additional health care services that are never included in official data. Then there is the GDP per capita data which is old on this website, doesn't include major shifts post-recent crisis. And many other things. Take it as a fun internet thingy, nothing to deep actual conclusions on.

Mr Tomb
21-05-11, 11:59
If The United States were your home instead of Tunisia you would...
use 11.2 times more electricity

The per capita consumption of electricity in The United States is 12,484kWh while in Tunisia it is 1,114kWh.

This entry consists of total electricity generated annually plus imports and minus exports, expressed in kilowatt-hours. The discrepancy between the amount of electricity generated and/or imported and the amount consumed and/or exported is accounted for as loss in transmission and distribution.
Source: CIA World Factbook
spend 18.9 times more money on health care

Per capita public and private health expenditures combined in The United States are $6,719 USD while Tunisia spends $355 USD

This entry contains the per capita public and private health expenditure at purchase power parity using US Dollars. This figure combines government, personal, and employer spending on health care
Source: World Health Organization
consume 7.4 times more oil

The United States consumes 2.6400 gallons of oil per day per capita while Tunisia consumes 0.3570

This entry is the total oil consumed in gallons per day (gal/day) divided by the population. The discrepancy between the amount of oil produced and/or imported and the amount consumed and/or exported is due to the omission of stock changes, refinery gains, and other complicating factors.
Source: CIA World Factbook
make 5.8 times more money

The GDP per capita in The United States is $46,400 while in Tunisia it is $8,000

This entry shows GDP on a purchasing power parity basis divided by population as of 1 July for the same year. A nation's GDP at purchasing power parity (PPP) exchange rates is the sum value of all goods and services produced in the country valued at prices prevailing in the United States. This is the measure most economists prefer when looking at per-capita welfare and when comparing living conditions or use of resources across countries. The measure is difficult to compute, as a US dollar value has to be assigned to all goods and services in the country regardless of whether these goods and services have a direct equivalent in the United States (for example, the value of an ox-cart or non-US military equipment); as a result, PPP estimates for some countries are based on a small and sometimes different set of goods and services. In addition, many countries do not formally participate in the World Bank's PPP project that calculates these measures, so the resulting GDP estimates for these countries may lack precision. For many developing countries, PPP-based GDP measures are multiples of the official exchange rate (OER) measure. The differences between the OER- and PPP-denominated GDP values for most of the wealthy industrialized countries are generally much smaller.
Source: CIA World Factbook
have 71.77% less chance of dying in infancy

The number of deaths of infants under one year old in a given year per 1,000 live births in The United States is 6.14 while in Tunisia it is 21.75.

This entry gives the number of deaths of infants under one year old in a given year per 1,000 live births in the same year; included is the total death rate, and deaths by sex, male and female. This rate is often used as an indicator of the level of health in a country.
Source: CIA World Factbook
be 6 times more likely to have HIV/AIDS

The number of adults living with HIV/AIDS in The United States is 0.60% while in Tunisia it is 0.10%.

This entry gives an estimate of the percentage of adults (aged 15-49) living with HIV/AIDS. The adult prevalence rate is calculated by dividing the estimated number of adults living with HIV/AIDS at yearend by the total adult population at yearend.
Source: CIA World Factbook
have 36.73% more chance at being employed

The United States has an unemployment rate of 9.30% while Tunisia has 14.70%

This entry contains the percent of the labor force that is without jobs.
Source: CIA World Factbook
experience 12.5% more of a class divide

The GINI index measures the degree of inequality in the distribution of family income. In The United States is 45.00 while in Tunisia it is 40.00.

This index measures the degree of inequality in the distribution of family income in a country. The index is calculated from the Lorenz curve, in which cumulative family income is plotted against the number of families arranged from the poorest to the richest. The index is the ratio of (a) the area between a country's Lorenz curve and the 45 degree helping line to (b) the entire triangular area under the 45 degree line. The more nearly equal a country's income distribution, the closer its Lorenz curve to the 45 degree line and the lower its Gini index, e.g., a Scandinavian country with an index of 25. The more unequal a country's income distribution, the farther its Lorenz curve from the 45 degree line and the higher its Gini index, e.g., a Sub-Saharan country with an index of 50. If income were distributed with perfect equality, the Lorenz curve would coincide with the 45 degree line and the index would be zero; if income were distributed with perfect inequality, the Lorenz curve would coincide with the horizontal axis and the right vertical axis and the index would be 100.
Source: CIA World Factbook
live 2.25 years longer

The life expectancy at birth in The United States is 78.24 while in Tunisia it is 75.99.

This entry contains the average number of years to be lived by a group of people born in the same year, if mortality at each age remains constant in the future. The entry includes total population as well as the male and female components. Life expectancy at birth is also a measure of overall quality of life in a country and summarizes the mortality at all ages. It can also be thought of as indicating the potential return on investment in human capital and is necessary for the calculation of various actuarial measures.
Source: CIA World Factbook
have 9.67% less babies

i didn't plan to be tunisian, i just got lucky <3

Rai
21-05-11, 12:08
I've decided. I want to live in Australia. So much better than the UK :D.

trfanX34
21-05-11, 12:13
If The United States were your home instead of Spain you would...
spend 2.7 times more money on health care
use 83.35% more electricity
consume 63.17% more oil
have 48.62% more chance at being employed
have 47.6% more chance of dying in infancy
have 44.97% more babies
experience 40.63% more of a class divide
make 37.69% more money
work 11.41% more hours each year
die 1.94 years sooner
be 20% more likely to have HIV/AIDS

Mad Tony
21-05-11, 12:14
I've decided. I want to live in Australia. So much better than the UK :D.Based purely on a few statistics?

TRfan23
21-05-11, 12:56
Request Deletion.

Rai
21-05-11, 13:05
Based purely on a few statistics?

Oh gawd. I was only basing it on those stats, but: My comment was lighthearted. Lighten up! :p

The education system there is said to be the worst out of all developed countries.

Honestly Australia isn't as good as the UK imo.

Just as well I'm done with my education then!

I've never been to Australia. I would love to visit and when I do, I'll make my own judgements on it. Either way, I'm happy in the UK. :D

Mad Tony
21-05-11, 13:17
Oh gawd. I was only basing it on those stats, but: My comment was lighthearted. Lighten up! :pFair enough. As I said, it's a lovely place and in some respects better than the UK (and vice versa). My Dad lives out there and he loves it but I doubt I'd ever move out there (even though I could very easily given the family connection).

miss.haggard
21-05-11, 14:45
Wow, Australia seems like a great place to live. They are better than here for everything.

I've decided. I want to live in Australia. So much better than the UK :D.

I think you're both forgetting that they didn't include the 100% more likely to die by a snake/giant ass spider! NO WAY.

Squibbly
21-05-11, 14:54
I think you're both forgetting that they didn't include the 100% more likely to die by a snake/giant ass spider! NO WAY.

Oh crap, you're right. :eek:

Rai
21-05-11, 15:13
I think you're both forgetting that they didn't include the 100% more likely to die by a snake/giant ass spider! NO WAY.

I'm with Squibbly: :eek:. Sod that then, Australia's out.

Squibbly
21-05-11, 15:16
I'll just stay right here where it's too cold for those scary things. I love Australia and want to go someday, but the thought of those creatures is a bit unsettling for me.

Mad Tony
21-05-11, 15:54
I'll just stay right here where it's too cold for those scary things. I love Australia and want to go someday, but the thought of those creatures is a bit unsettling for me.I think the creature problem is way over-exaggerated. I've been to Australia three times for a combined total of over two months and to every state on the east coast and I've never seen any massive spiders or snakes crawling around the place.

miss.haggard
21-05-11, 18:13
I think the creature problem is way over-exaggerated. I've been to Australia three times for a combined total of over two months and to every state on the east coast and I've never seen any massive spiders or snakes crawling around the place.

Just because you can't see them, doesn't mean they aren't there. :pi:

b0bb13
21-05-11, 18:31
If Sweden were your home instead of Romania you would...

be 100% more Popular.

>:

Mad Tony
21-05-11, 18:34
Just because you can't see them, doesn't mean they aren't there. :pi:Never thought of that...

jackles
21-05-11, 19:06
Hmm well I figured the fact that I would earn more in Australia would be cancelled out by the amount I would spend on health!



Also you have to get past the fact that warmer countries would either use less electricity etc because either they were warm or too poor to have any! So figures would be skewed on that score.

I was surprised we came out as well as we did do...I decided I was much better off here!