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domino92
30-05-11, 18:57
So I read this article just now.

A drug that seems to dampen bad memories, while leaving other memories intact, may one day be used to treat post-traumatic stress disorder.


Previously, scientists knew that a stress hormone called cortisol affects people's ability to form new memories and decrease negative emotions that might have been associated with them. But they thought once memories had solidified, they could no longer be affected by cortisol.

A new study led by researchers at the Centre for Studies on Human Stress, affiliated with the University of Montreal, shows that in fact, metyrapone, a drug that temporarily alters cortisol levels can be used to dampen an old, negative memory for days and possibly the long term.

"It gives us a second chance, basically, to act on the memory," said Marie-France Marin, lead author of the study published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism.

That makes it potentially very useful, because most memories that cause problems are older rather than newly formed.

"Soldiers, for example, or rape victims, are not going to go to the emergency room within an hour, obviously," Marin said Thursday.

She added that many people who experience traumatic events don't necessarily go on to develop post-traumatic stress disorder, and the fact that the drug works long after the memory was formed means it can be selectively given to people who have suffered long-term effects from a traumatic experience.

The study involved 33 men who were asked to watch a story in the form of slides with audio narration. The story starts off as an emotionally neutral tale of a little girl who visits her grandparents and builds a birdhouse. The middle three slides show an accident where the girl's hand gets mutilated and bloodied with a saw. The final four slides are also neutral, as the girl gets medical care and is expected to be fine.

Three days later, the volunteers were given a placebo or one or two doses of a drug called metyrapone, which dramatically decreases levels of cortisol, which is normally present at a certain level in the blood.

They were then asked to recall the story.

Those who received two doses of metyrapone had significantly more trouble remembering the negative parts of the story compared to the rest of the story. That effect was not seen among those who had taken the single dose or the placebo.

Four days later, when their cortisol levels were back to normal, the participants came back into the lab and were asked to recall the story again.

Those who had taken two doses of metyrapone still had trouble remembering the negative parts of the story.

That result surprised the researchers.

It seems to show that contrary to what scientists previously believed, "at the time of retrieving the memory, you open an opportunity for the memory to be changed," Marin said. "And by lowering the cortisol levels, you change it in a lasting manner."

Marin said the researchers believe the double dose had an effect where the single one didn't because the two doses were separated by three hours, lowering cortisol levels for a longer time.

Potential use during psychotherapy

She foresees that the drug may one day be given to people with serious cases of post-traumatic stress disorder during psychotherapy, when they are asked to describe their traumatic experiences.

However, before that happens, the researchers must do more work to figure out whether the technique will work on memories that are years old instead of days old, and just how long-lasting the effects are.

"A lot of studies are needed to get to the perfect treatment, obviously," she said.

She also emphasized that the drug should only be used in cases of people with very serious cases of PTSD.

"It's really, really to help people who could not recover, who could not live a normal life, basically," she said.

"You can't start giving this to everyone who has a bad day?. Memories are important. They define who you are."



http://sync.sympatico.ca/news/contentposting_cbc?newsitemid=science-drug-memories-ptsd&feedname=cbc-tech-science-v3&show=false&number=10&showbyline=true&subtitle=&detect=&abc=abc&date=true&pagenumber=2&paginationenabled=false

Huh. A drug that makes you forget. Hope that doesnt become a common drug, cuz that could be reeeeaally dangerous.

ultima espio
30-05-11, 19:04
Hmm...interesting. I have loooads of memories I'd like to forget...

How will it even know what memory to forget?:confused:

domino92
30-05-11, 19:09
Good question. Maybe it reacts to hormones triggered by bad memories?

Im no Neurologist so I dont know. :confused:

Kelly Craftman
30-05-11, 19:11
Good memories and bad memories are all stored the same way and retrieved the same way. :/ I can't see how it works

NRO.
30-05-11, 19:12
Gimme gimme gimme gimme gimme gimme gimme gimme gimme gimme gimme.

Do it!

Legend of Lara
30-05-11, 19:13
Good memories and bad memories are all stored the same way and retrieved the same way. :/ I can't see how it works

True dat.

And, like, forgetting bad experiences could totally negate character development.

Yes, I use terms like character development to describe real life junk.

Kelly Craftman
30-05-11, 19:16
Unless they are stored in different parts of the brain, and the drug completely wipes of the store. That's my suggestion xD

Cochrane
30-05-11, 19:31
If it works, then it could be very useful for PTSD. But it should be obvious that this isn't something you give to children whose parents didn't buy them the latest Lady Gaga album or whatever.

Mad Tony
30-05-11, 19:35
The only memories I'd want to erase are those of films and books, so you can watch and read them over and over again like it's the first time.

xXhayleyroxXx
30-05-11, 19:37
I'd take it :p

Dark Lugia 2
30-05-11, 19:50
Sounds interesting!

larafan25
30-05-11, 20:03
The only memories I'd want to erase are those of films and books, so you can watch and read them over and over again like it's the first time.

I agree.

I think it would feel weird to loose a memory....I wouldn't want to accidentally loose all my memories. :/

Dark Lugia 2
30-05-11, 20:07
I agree.

I think it would feel weird to loose a memory....I wouldn't want to accidentally loose all my memories. :/

I dont think you would notice. :p

larafan25
30-05-11, 20:11
I dont think you would notice. :p

That's what I mean!:p

Would you remember why you went to that place anyways? You'd be like "I know I'm here to loose a memory...but what?"....:/

patriots88888
30-05-11, 23:58
http://bighollywood.breitbart.com/files/2009/05/just_say_know.jpg

:p

Encore
31-05-11, 00:05
Reminds me of the movie Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind.

Even if this was possible - I doubt it -, bad memories are an integral part of our personality and, quite often, they're actually what drives you into becoming a better or more mature person. So, unless we're talking about extremely traumatic episodes that effectively cripple someone's ability to live their lives, this would be a bad idea.

Ikas90
31-05-11, 02:43
Even if this was possible - I doubt it -, bad memories are an integral part of our personality and, quite often, they're actually what drives you into becoming a better or more mature person. So, unless we're talking about extremely traumatic episodes that effectively cripple someone's ability to live their lives, this would be a bad idea.

Pretty much said everything I wanted to.