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Quasimodo
16-06-11, 22:16
I found myself disagreeing with part of this quote from Nelson Mandela:

"Our deepest fear is not that we are inadequate. Our
deepest fear is that we are powerful beyond measure.
It is our light, not our darkness, that most frightens
us. We ask ourselves: who am I to be brilliant,
gorgeous, talented, and fabulous? Actually who are you
not to be? You are a child of God. Your playing small
does not serve the world. There is nothing enlightened
about shrinking so that people around you wont feel
insecure. We are all meant to shine, as children do.
We are born to manifest the glory of God within us. It
is not just in some of us: it is in everyone. And as
we let our light shine, we unconsciously give other
people permission to do the same. As we are liberated
from our fear, our presence automatically liberates
others."

I disagree with the message of this quote on the condition that it could give people an excuse for arrogance. You might not be serving the world by being humble to spare the feelings of others, but rubbing your success in others' faces doesn't exactly yield positive results, either. Here's some other points in support of humility, albeit not airtight ones: Humility can serve a practical purpose for your own survival; we fear the jealousy of others for good reason. When you've got something other people want and you make it plain for others to see, you become a target. If you make someone feel small, they'll resent you and might act against you.

Do you think humility is a virtue or a vice?

Love2Raid
16-06-11, 22:19
I think it is. But you should be careful that you don't go too extreme with it and let others run you over and think you're insecure...

tampi
16-06-11, 22:57
Humility is the measure that everyone puts on their own efforts.

What do you think on this?



Not long ago I heard, humility offends arrogance (Or something).


That's just curious because a feeling that tries don,t offends other people, offends other sentiment.


It,s a bit what Mandela was talking there.

Do not forget that the truth about our own qualities give us other people.

Super Badnik
17-06-11, 00:37
When you highlight that part I do not entirely agree with it, but in context its quite different...
Your playing small does not serve the world. There is nothing enlightened about shrinking so that people around you wont feel insecure. We are all meant to shine, as children do.I don't think its saying that acting arrogant or bigging up your achievements or postion are necessarily positive things. It seems to be refering to ones actions, encouraging people to "play" as big as they can in the context of serving "the world".

Or maybe I'm just interpreting the quote wrong.

skylark1121
17-06-11, 00:45
I interpret it as: You are not using humility by shrinking just for the security of another. Some call that arrogance, but humility is not used by not addressing the issue; whether you come off as arrogant if not. Make sense? :)

Dennis's Mom
17-06-11, 00:47
I disagree with the message of this quote on the condition that it could give people an excuse for arrogance. You might not be serving the world by being humble to spare the feelings of others, but rubbing your success in others' faces doesn't exactly yield positive results, either. Here's some other points in support of humility, albeit not airtight ones: Humility can serve a practical purpose for your own survival; we fear the jealousy of others for good reason. When you've got something other people want and you make it plain for others to see, you become a target. If you make someone feel small, they'll resent you and might act against you.

Do you think humility is a virtue or a vice?

Many have said humility is the first virtue. From it do all others spring.

I'm not sure that Mandela is arguing against humility here. I think he's addressing our fear of accepting challenges.

IceColdLaraCroft
17-06-11, 01:58
I think it has to do with honesty.

There are people that are "humble" to illicit a particular response because they know people will praise them.

But the quote that you put in bold is a message that you shouldn't hold back in your abilities/talents because you feel you'll hurt someone else.

I often hold back when it comes to intelligence. Some of my friends aren't very smart and I refuse to correct them in some instances because otherwise i'd ALWAYS be correcting them and that's not a good friendship.

Tyrannosaurus
17-06-11, 06:04
False humility is a vice. True humility is a virtue. To exercise humility is to exercise honesty, and charity toward one's self. Self-pity, on the other hand, is sin.

domina
17-06-11, 06:19
False humility is a vice. True humility is a virtue. To exercise humility is to exercise honesty, and charity toward one's self. Self-pity, on the other hand, is sin.

This, more or less, was my reaction when I saw the thread title. False humility is rarely more than arrogance under the guise of modesty, and I think that's worse than being openly arrogant. People fishing for compliments, pity, reassurance, etc. by trying to convince others they aren't as great as they truly think they are drive me up the wall. I will happily take overt arrogance over that crap.

In regards to the quotation specifically, I don't think he's necessarily promoting arrogance and people rubbing their achievements in others' faces. I think he's saying that people shouldn't feel compelled to make light of their achievements when their successes are validated. When we do good, it's okay to revel in that to an extent. I think it's important for people to recognize their achievements.

And to get more into my personal opinions on it, I don't think people should feel bad about their successes because others can't reach them as well. We're all different. We all have different strengths and weaknesses. I'm not going to pretend like I'm not good at something because someone else isn't either. This isn't to say that I'm going to go up to someone who isn't as artistically inclined as me and say "haha, you can't draw like I can," but I'm also not going to pretend like I can't draw well just so someone else doesn't feel bad. I can't stand that coddling self-esteem crap, and I don't really think it helps anyone anyway.

Encore
17-06-11, 11:27
Humility is what prevents you from blinding yourself to your life and reality. It's only by acknowledging that you're not perfect or almighty or all-knowing, that you can work to learn more and become more.

Humility is not self-depreciation. Two completely different things.

EscondeR
17-06-11, 11:35
I don't think its saying that acting arrogant or bigging up your achievements or postion are necessarily positive things. It seems to be refering to ones actions, encouraging people to "play" as big as they can in the context of serving "the world".

This. Play big, talk small - this is the best humility you can master :) The quote rather refers to people's actual achievements and contribution, than simple throwing visual aspects of personal welth and success into others' eyes.

interstellardave
17-06-11, 12:11
I agree with what Mandela said... I think you're interpretation is too extreme. Not holding yourself back is quite a different thing from holding others down. If you shine brightly just by being "all you can be"--but others are threatened by it--that is really their issue, not yours. He's not talking about a persons' negative actions; he's talking about not shrinking away from other peoples' negative reactions to your achievements.

Ikas90
17-06-11, 13:53
A lot of people seem to confuse being a good person with arrogance.

Who's really the arrogant one?