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View Full Version : Canada Switches To Plastic Money


EmeraldFields
21-06-11, 01:43
7chpllnU-To&feature

I think other countries like Australia and Singapore have plastic bils as well, but I still can't get over how cool they look! :D

larafan25
21-06-11, 01:44
Ah! I didn't even know about this but I want some (obvi)!

!Lara Croft!
21-06-11, 01:50
We switched to plastic money here in new zealand [and australia] ages ago.

http://t3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQb4jCBO5Z5QYS4tNTlL8S1V-kVh7SRw-LoEla6rA1ipE64GtPcqQ&t=1

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_sS7XORtesWY/R7ocH7B-3WI/AAAAAAAAANY/_Dc_OXkQpWM/s320/AUSS7F.jpg

SkyPuppy
21-06-11, 01:51
very neat!

Squibbly
21-06-11, 01:53
Cool. :D
Looking forward to having this in my pocket.

Sir Croft
21-06-11, 01:55
It's very nice but, to be honest, I think the design is rather ugly.

Shark_Blade
21-06-11, 01:56
We have that too, it's much more durable. :)

Although, one time my little sister tried to iron a crumpled note once and it just...ruined like burnt plastic lol.

SoupCard
21-06-11, 01:58
Pretty cool.

Tombraiderx08
21-06-11, 01:58
That's actually pretty damn cool :tmb:

!Lara Croft!
21-06-11, 01:59
We have that too, it's much more durable. :)

Although, one time my little sister tried to iron a crumpled note once and it just...ruined like burnt plastic lol.

Yeah you need to do it at a VERY low temperature.

b.gluch
21-06-11, 02:04
waiiiiiit :eek: is this for real D: My money is gonne be so bitchinnnnnnnnnnnn' :jmp:

Shark_Blade
21-06-11, 02:06
Yeah you need to do it at a VERY low temperature.She just had to learn it the hard way. :p

!Lara Croft!
21-06-11, 02:25
So did I....$10 melted...

Bongo Fury
21-06-11, 03:04
looks ok i guess. it's been aggravating trying to pass a hundred dollar bill in this country for a while now. anyways, the big winners here are the folks who manufacture the cash machines because all the hardware is going to have to be replaced to accept the funky new bills.

Catracoth
21-06-11, 03:16
It looks good! Does that mean you can get it wet and it won't damage? :D

Shark_Blade
21-06-11, 03:22
^Of course. :)

b.gluch
21-06-11, 03:29
It looks good! Does that mean you can get it wet and it won't damage? :D

:jmp: i can finaly leave my money in my pants while they are in the washing machine

ozzman
21-06-11, 04:00
United States Need Plastic Money,

Cochrane
21-06-11, 07:01
Interesting technology, and looks great!

Oh, about ironing a banknote: Why on earth would you do that? Just buy something with it and let someone else deal with the problem.

lara c. fan
21-06-11, 07:05
:jmp: i can finaly leave my money in my pants while they are in the washing machine

I wouldn't recommend it though...

jajay119
21-06-11, 07:48
My money has been plastic for a while, it's called a bank card. I very rarely use actually paper and coins money anymore.

patriots88888
21-06-11, 09:30
Washing machine nightmares solved. I can't tell you how many times I've washed my money. :p

voltz
21-06-11, 09:45
I'd like to see a fat cat just try to smoke one of these.

sandygrimm
21-06-11, 10:41
Washing machine nightmares solved. I can't tell you how many times I've washed my money. :p

oh for sure!

We had plastic money for over...5 years o since 2000 here in Romania

Dark Lugia 2
21-06-11, 11:19
Can you bend them to fit them into wallets? :p Or do people need wallets the size of those notes now? I like the design!

scoopy_loopy
21-06-11, 11:44
Welcome to the modern world! :tea:


Can you bend them to fit them into wallets? :p Or do people need wallets the size of those notes now? I like the design!

XXXD They bend just as easily as paper.

drakl0r
21-06-11, 11:47
We have that too, it's much more durable. :)

Although, one time my little sister tried to iron a crumpled note once and it just...ruined like burnt plastic lol.

Yup, the RM5 note lol :p

xXhayleyroxXx
21-06-11, 11:52
They look awesome :D

IceColdLaraCroft
21-06-11, 11:54
I think the reason why money was made of paper was that it could be shredded and re purposed. Metal money can be melted down.

But plastic money...would it become trash?

xXhayleyroxXx
21-06-11, 11:57
I think the reason why money was made of paper was that it could be shredded and re purposed. Metal money can be melted down.

But plastic money...would it become trash?

I guess it could be melted down but that would be harmful to the environment, would it not?

LNSNHGTDS
21-06-11, 12:05
Plastic money :/ ?
It just seems so wrong to me :p , anyway, it looks innovative but I certainly wouldn't try it unless I had to!

Dark Lugia 2
21-06-11, 12:57
I think the reason why money was made of paper was that it could be shredded and re purposed. Metal money can be melted down.

But plastic money...would it become trash?

I thought it might be bad at first as plastic is harder to recycle... but isnt money always gonna be in circulation?

Avalon SARL
21-06-11, 13:58
^ Exactly, I had the same question when I watched this.

Lara Croft!
21-06-11, 14:09
I thought it might be bad at first as plastic is harder to recycle... but isnt money always gonna be in circulation?

Exactly. And since plastic is more durable than paper, it won't need replacements. Very good idea.

jajay119
21-06-11, 14:12
I thought it might be bad at first as plastic is harder to recycle... but isnt money always gonna be in circulation?

Yeah, but here in the UK they change the print style every now and then, not every often. I think the 20 note was changed about 4 years ago for the first time in about 20 years. But that's a lot of notes when they go out of circulation.
Unless they're resuable.

tampi
21-06-11, 14:17
My thought is that sooner it will be more expensive the money paper itself that the money that represent that paper :confused:


But yes, it's quite cool

lara c. fan
21-06-11, 15:29
Plastic can be recycled, can't it?

MyRaider4Life
21-06-11, 15:43
Following in Australia's footsteps, eh?

We think of the greatest things. :cool:

scoopy_loopy
21-06-11, 15:44
Following in Australia's footsteps, eh?

We think of the greatest things. :cool:

Heck yeah! :cool:

Catapharact
21-06-11, 15:45
Following in Australia's footsteps, eh?

We think of the greatest things. :cool:

Yeah well, too bad you guys didn't take any actual financial tips from us ;). If you did, you guys could have done something about your crippling interest rates :p.

Cochrane
21-06-11, 15:54
I thought it might be bad at first as plastic is harder to recycle... but isnt money always gonna be in circulation?

Plastic is really quite easy to recycle, as long as it is all of the same type. Then it can just be molten, processed a bit and cast into something new (grains are popular for shipping). The problem with recycling plastic is if you have a big batch of plastic and don't know what parts of it are Polypropylene, PVC and so on. You have to separate them first before recycling, and that is way too expensive, so recycling is not currently possible.

For this money, though? No problem. It's not like anyone throws old bank notes in the trash. Instead, whenever a bank note comes back to the central bank (which happens surprisingly often), it is checked to see if it isn't a fake, and whether it can still be used. If I recall correctly, a five euro bill, which is paper, has an average life span of less than a year.

Now, when the Bank of Canada decides that a plastic bill is no longer useful, they can just shred it (to stop anyone from using it again) and then give a huge pile of shredded cash to a recycler. Since the recycler knows in advance that this is all going to be shredded money, and hence the type of polymer used for Canadian money, recycling it is pretty easy. In fact, it is better than with paper: Recycled paper is always worse than new paper. Recycled plastic, if done properly, can be just as good as new plastic.

trfanX34
21-06-11, 15:56
That's so cool! I'll take 50.

scoopy_loopy
21-06-11, 16:23
Yeah well, too bad you guys didn't take any actual financial tips from us ;). If you did, you guys could have done something about your crippling interest rates :p.

Pfft, like you're qualified to make calls like that. "Crippling interest rates", uh-uh, they're high because the Aussie economy is on fire. XD

Catapharact
21-06-11, 16:29
Pfft, like you're qualified to make calls like that. "Crippling interest rates", uh-uh, they're high because the economy is on fire. XD

Really... Is that why employment numbers are at an all time low in Australia? And by comparison to Canada's GDP growth as well as employment figures, you guys might as well be the lemonade shop opened up by the two neighborhood kids who desperately want to raise some funds without thinking about the fact that those low interest rates was the only thing that was keeping the economy afloat. You put the brakes on wayyy too soon. Way WAY too soon. And its working against ya.

scoopy_loopy
21-06-11, 16:41
Really... Is that why employment numbers are at an all time low in Australia? And by comparison to Canada's GDP growth as well as employment figures, you guys might as well be the lemonade shop opened up by the two neighborhood kids who desperately want to raise some funds without thinking about the fact that those low interest rates was the only thing that was keeping the economy afloat. You put the brakes on wayyy too soon. Way WAY too soon. And its working against ya.

Home girl, quit your trolling. Where are you even getting this information from? You're comparing two VERY different economies, and it doesn't sound like you're very learned on the subject.

Catapharact
21-06-11, 16:50
Home girl, quit your trolling. Where are you even getting this information from? You're comparing two VERY different economies, and it doesn't sound like you're very learned on the subject.

One look at the economic index will tell you the basic information about current Australian economic standings dear boy. Makes me wonder as to if you investing in business realted courses is actually paying off ;). If I were you I would switch majors right now ;).

Its no trolling; Its basic facts:

1) Australian high interest rates has significantly dropped borrowing rates at the banks which in turn usually signifies that spending is decreasing and as such, the economy is slowly edging towards a downwards slope.

2) The value of the Australian dollar is quite high compared to the U.S. dollar. This can lead to a number of economic problems e.g. decreased tourism and investment and our exports becoming less attractive. Most import partners of Australia might look for businesses elsewhere.

3) Inflation... Big inflation. Especially covering the commodities and Real Estate sectors. If you know ANYTHING about the Australian economy, you would know that commodities are an essential part of it. If this particular sector sees a decrease in investment, you might as well say goodbye to economic recovery for quite a few years more.

So.... Now that you have been schooled in the basics of economics, it might be a good idea to hit the local library and pick up a book... And read it offcourse ;).

scoopy_loopy
21-06-11, 16:52
Oh god. You're embarrassing yourself.

Catapharact
21-06-11, 16:54
Oh god. You're embarrassing yourself.

Translation: "I know virtually nothing on the subject but I gotta say something to make a comeback."

Scoopy... It would be much better if you hit the books and learn something for a change.

scoopy_loopy
21-06-11, 17:33
I didn't really want to go on replying about this, as it has nothing to do with the thread and you've done little better than act a troll.

I've not delved too deeply into marco-economics, no. It's not my favorites -- I prefer micro, company accounts, etc. Call me greedy. But clearly you don't hold any economic degrees yourself, so I'll have a go at addressing what points you made (that weren't lame attempts at being insulting).

Really... Is that why employment numbers are at an all time low in Australia? And by comparison to Canada's GDP growth as well as employment figures, you guys might as well be the lemonade shop opened up by the two neighborhood kids who desperately want to raise some funds without thinking about the fact that those low interest rates was the only thing that was keeping the economy afloat. You put the brakes on wayyy too soon. Way WAY too soon. And its working against ya.

*sigh* These figures depend on so many variables and hardly can be truly indicative of one economy "verse" another. But since you seem so keen:

Australian real GDP growth '10: 2.3%
Canadian: 0.4%

Unemployment in Australia '10: 4.6% (down from 4.8%)
Canada: 6.1% (up from 6.0%)

Sources:
http://www.oecd-ilibrary.org/economics/country-statistical-profile-australia_20752288-table-aus
http://www.oecd-ilibrary.org/economics/country-statistical-profile-canada_20752288-table-can



One look at the economic index will tell you the basic information about current Australian economic standings dear boy. Makes me wonder as to if you investing in business realted courses is actually paying off ;). If I were you I would switch majors right now ;).

Its no trolling; Its basic facts:

1) Australian high interest rates has significantly dropped borrowing rates at the banks which in turn usually signifies that spending is decreasing and as such, the economy is slowly edging towards a downwards slope.

Unless you can back this up, I call BS -- especially regarding the economy "slowly edging a towards a downwards slope".

2) The value of the Australian dollar is quite high compared to the U.S. dollar. This can lead to a number of economic problems e.g. decreased tourism and investment and our exports becoming less attractive. Most import partners of Australia might look for businesses elsewhere.

This is obviously copied and pasted from some other internet user. Notable by the inappropriate use of "our". :facepalm: The higher dollar is affecting tourism, little else. It aids consumer spending, as consumer goods come down drastically in price. The current boom is being fed by China, which is buying up Australian resources almost if not as fast as they're dug out of the Earth. China isn't letting up just because the AUD is on the rise. No one else can supply them as we can.

3) Inflation... Big inflation. Especially covering the commodities and Real Estate sectors. If you know ANYTHING about the Australian economy, you would know that commodities are an essential part of it. If this particular sector sees a decrease in investment, you might as well say goodbye to economic recovery for quite a few years more.

Inflation in the real estate sector has recently made spotlight, it's driven by a lack of land being freed up for development by the state governments (this is a particular problem in Sydney). Inflation regarding commodities... You accuse me of a lack of knowledge regarding the economy here, which is rather funny as inflation is largely being driven by the fact that China is buying up commodities faster than we can keep up with. Hence, high interest-rates.

Now, can we please give this up? I have no idea why you've chosen to go to town with this. It's so ridiculous.

Catapharact
21-06-11, 17:51
I didn't really want to go on replying about this, as it has nothing to do with the thread and you've done little better than act a troll.

I've not delved too deeply into marco-economics, no. It's not my favorites -- I prefer micro, company accounts, etc. Call me greedy. But clearly you don't hold any economic degrees yourself, so I'll have a go at addressing what points you made (that weren't lame attempts at being insulting).

So in short, you finally decided to man up and use ACTUAL knowladge rather then plain goofy attempts at "post tag." Good on you. You need to take both Macro AND Micro economics to get a degree in Management. Its an essental part of the course. Now lets address YOUR points:

Given the standing of the economic recovery process, Austalia was 5-10 percent lower in standing during the economic crisis period during after which it recovered AFTER it slashed its interest rates. Right now, the current economic growth period for Australia PER CAPITA (that is on a person on person basis.) is still dismal. Yes I like Mircoeconomics as well and through its projections, manufacturing sector in Australia as well as the real estate market has had it.

Source: http://www.smartcompany.com.au/property/20110517-has-the-australian-housing-market-hit-a-wall-a-smartcompany-q-a.html

The expectations never lived up to the actual projected hype and as such the interest rates have been risen way too soon. Get it now?

As for the cripping effect of high interest rates:

http://www.creditcardapplication.com.au/2011/06/australian-personal-debt-spikes-with-higher-interest-rates/

And that is just the icing on the cake when it comes to personal problems... Since you are such a fan of Microeconomics ;).

The second part of the statement with the "our" significance was actually a post I made earlier on the same forum and I was just looking back at it for reference purposes. The higher dollar only aids DOMESTIC growth but how can you expect domestic growth to increase when you have spiking interest rates which cripple spending and personal expenditures? (again microeconomics ;).) In turn this repeating cycle of stupidity (i.e. rising inflation and rising interest rates) will only demoralize consumer confidence and again, you can expect another recession hitting you on the head pretty soon.

And your commodities being the highlight of your economy is one of many crippling problems that Australia has ;). China actually had the opportunity to invest in your sector and create jobs. The high interest rates are actually an offset of projected "growth" in other sectors (i.e. real estate, manufacturing, etc.) that never happened. So instead of actually owning up to the problem, Australian government decides to rely on the backbone of their economy for help (i.e. the commodities.) And that is where the current conundrum stands.

jjbennett
21-06-11, 18:00
Lulz.