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Vanni
21-06-11, 13:24
Hey all. :)

I was watching It's Me or the Dog (one of my favourite shows), and there was a woman namd Melissa. However, Victoria (who is English) pronounced her name "Melisser". I've noticed this a lot with British people: they say words that end in A as if they end in ER. I was watching a British music show once and the host said Lady GaGa's name "Lady Gager".

Are there any English people who do this and/or can tell me why? Is it just how the British do things? :p

Thanks. :)


x

Dark Lugia 2
21-06-11, 13:37
Thats because of the different dialects around the country. Basically, in different parts of the country people tend to say and pronnounce the same words in a slightly different way. I hope that explains it! :p

scremanie
21-06-11, 13:47
I always thought they ended words like "Melissuh", or is that just me? :pi:

toxicraider
21-06-11, 13:48
I pronounce Gaga as Gah-gah, but I do pronounce Victoria with a bit of an er sound, but Melissa with the 'uh' sound. It's just how pronunciation is. :p

Edit;
I can't actually figure out which way I pronounce Victoria or Melissa, both feel right. :vlol:

Cali
21-06-11, 13:50
Yeah agreeing with the others here.
I don't say Ga-Gerr, I say Ga-Gah, but I think that's because she's from America and I would sound stupid if I said it differently. But things that do end in an 'a', I tend to say it as 'uh', like Meliss-uh and Victori-uh.

Super Badnik
21-06-11, 13:57
So how would your pronounce Melissa in American English? Surely "Melisser" sounds more or less exactly as its written. And I've never heard anyone say "Lady Ga-ger".

xXhayleyroxXx
21-06-11, 13:59
Yeah, its 'Melisser'. And for your point about lady gaga I pronounce it 'gar-gar ' xD

jackles
21-06-11, 17:06
I would say gar-gar too..but I would say Meliss-ah.


I teach phonics but some of the sounds can sound different depending on your regional accent. I sometimes teach the kids that some words sound better 'posh' some sound better with a scottish tinge!


A southern english thing is to say words with an added 'r' in them. Bath becomes Bar-th, Castle becomes Car-stle.


There are loads of regional accents in the uk.

godmodder
21-06-11, 17:16
I find it amazing how many different accents there are in England, and yet it's almost always understandable. Try learning Dutch and then come over to Belgium here. I guarantee that you won't understand a word :D

Jami393
21-06-11, 17:17
Hey all. :)

I was watching It's Me or the Dog (one of my favourite shows), and there was a woman namd Melissa. However, Victoria (who is English) pronounced her name "Melisser". I've noticed this a lot with British people: they say words that end in A as if they end in ER. I was watching a British music show once and the host said Lady GaGa's name "Lady Gager".

Are there any English people who do this and/or can tell me why? Is it just how the British do things? :p

Thanks. :)


x

Yeah we can pernouce it like that but it depends on what part of the country you come from. Also don't believe everything you hear from TV because I've heard a few actors do a british accent from a bunch of US shows and most of us don't talk like that.

patriots88888
21-06-11, 17:27
Are there any English people who do this and/or can tell me why?

Visit Massachusetts and some other New England states and you're likely to hear the same. JFK liked his 'er's' as well as anyone. 'Chiner' (China) anyone? :p

Mad Tony
21-06-11, 17:35
Who actually pronounce Gaga as anything other than "Gah-gah"? I've never heard anyone pronounce it differently.

Spong
21-06-11, 17:39
Who actually pronounce Gaga as anything other than "Gah-gah"? I've never heard anyone pronounce it differently.

This. Even with regional accents, it's still "Gah-gah". I've never heard anyone in the UK pronounce it as "Gah-ger", they'd be laughed into committing suicide.

touchthesky
21-06-11, 18:03
My sister is Melissa.

I just say twat though. :ton:

Mad Tony
21-06-11, 18:03
This. Even with regional accents, it's still "Gah-gah". I've never heard anyone in the UK pronounce it as "Gah-ger", they'd be laughed into committing suicide.I didn't just mean here, I meant anywhere. I've never heard any Americans pronounce it different either.

patriots88888
21-06-11, 18:04
^^ Would that be pronounced twat or twert? :p

Rachel Croft
21-06-11, 18:07
The British vocalize their words more with their lips. Americans pronounce their dialect with their checks, so the words come out less refined, as opposed to British dialect, which which is shapped better because of the lip use in their words, if you can picture that.

jajay119
21-06-11, 18:08
It's called the intrusive 'r' feature if i remember my phonetics and phonology lecures well. It's a feature of some accents where a soft r sound is inserted unconciously by the speaker. It's mainly but not exclusively found in more southern accents, if i'm not mistaken.

aidanmalone
21-06-11, 18:11
Mines more of a -uh than an -er at the end :p
But its gah gah for me :)
My yorkshire accent means i miss the h off some words
Like for example i say Kingston Upon 'Ull or 'Ows it going :vlol:

Vanni
21-06-11, 18:52
Visit Massachusetts and some other New England states and you're likely to hear the same. JFK liked his 'er's' as well as anyone. 'Chiner' (China) anyone? :p

...I live in Boston. XD

I can't find the video, guys, but there's a clip from the British music show T4, and two hosts were out in a trailer I think and they were talking about GaGa, and the female host pronounced her name "Lady Gagar". :p


x

patriots88888
21-06-11, 18:58
...I live in Boston. XD

x

Then I take it you haven't heard anyone speak in this manner there? Maybe it was a Kennedy thing, IDK? *shrugs* I actually have heard other residents of that area pronounce words that end in 'a' in that way (mainly TV/sports announcers, reporters, etc...), but the Kennedy's were by far the most notable.

Vanni
07-07-11, 23:26
I know this is an older thread, but I just found an example. :tea:

Toby pronounces "Calcutta" as "Calcutter" at 0:51. :p

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=shB4nDTkyOE&NR=1



x

EmeraldFields
08-07-11, 04:10
I always thought it was funny how some accents from the UK add an "r" sound to the end of some words. I remember watching America's Next Top Model and Nigel, who was one of the judges, always pronounced "Amanda" as "Amandur" :p

Apathetic
08-07-11, 04:21
I always thought British people turn "a" at the end of a sentence into "er" when the next word starts with a vowel or something.

jajay119
08-07-11, 07:02
^ We do, to break up our words- Because we don't have the same intonation as American and Australian english. It's more common in some accents than others, such as the Bristolian accent. It's one of two things called the 'intrusive 'r' feature' or the 'interlinking 'r' feature'. I said this on the last page but no one seemed to listen, despite wanting an answer still!

Linking R

In non-rhotic accents, words historically ending in /r/ (as evidenced by an ‹r› in the spelling) may be pronounced with [r] when they are closely followed by another morpheme beginning with a vowel sound. For example, tuner amp may be pronounced [ˈtjuːnər śmp].[9] This is the case even though tuner would not otherwise be pronounced with an [r]. Here, "closely" means the following word must be in the same prosodic unit (that is, not separated by a pausa). This phenomenon is known as linking R. Not all non-rhotic varieties feature linking R. A notable non-rhotic accent that does not have linking R is Southern American English.[10]
A non rhotic accent is one that doesn't round it's vowel sounds such as the liverpool scouse accent.
So basically, in the Liverpool accent 'tuner' alone would be pronounced 'tyunah' but to link it to a following word beginning with the same sound, such as tuner amp (tuner ending in a short [a] sound and amp starting with the same, would be pronounced Tyuneramp, as apposed to the more Londonised pronunciation (which is rhotic, tuner ends in a short [a] sound while amp starts with a long one giving the rounding effect) of 'tyunah-ahhmp'


Intrusive R

The phenomenon of intrusive R is an overgeneralizing reinterpretation[11][12] of linking R into an r-insertion rule that affects any word that ends in the non-high vowels /ə/, /ɪə/, /ɑː/, or /ɔː/;[13] when such a word is closely followed by another word beginning in a vowel sound, an [r] is inserted between them, even when no final /r/ was historically present.[14] For example, the phrase tuna oil would be pronounced [ˈtjuːnər ɔɪl]. The [r] is inserted epenthetically to prevent two consecutive vowel sounds.[15] Other recognizable examples are the Beatles singing: "I saw-r-a film today, oh boy" in the song "A Day in the Life", from their 1967 Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band album, or at the Sanctus in the Catholic Mass: "Hosanna-r-in the highest".

Just like linking R, intrusive R may also occur between a root morpheme and certain suffixes, such as draw(r)ing, withdraw(r)al or Kafka(r)esque . This is now common enough in parts of England that, by 1997, the linguist John C. Wells considered it objectively part of Received Pronunciation, though he noted that it was still stigmatized as an incorrect pronunciation,[16] as it is or was in some other standardized non-rhotic accents. Wells writes that, at least in RP, "linking /r/ and intrusive /r/ are distinct only historically and orthographically".[17]

Rhotic dialects do not feature intrusive R. A rhotic speaker may use alternative strategies such as a hiatus between the two consecutive vowel sounds, or the insertion of a glottal stop to clarify the boundary between the two words. Varieties that feature linking R but not intrusive R (that is, tuna oil is pronounced [ˈtjuːnə (ʔ)ɔɪl]), show a clear phonemic distinction between words with and without /r/ in the syllable coda.[18]


from wikipedia, your friend!

Tyrannosaurus
08-07-11, 07:06
I'm sighing at the fact that I pronounced the Thames phonetically during my Word World reading, and not "Temz" as the Brits call it.

skylark1121
08-07-11, 08:08
They usually end a word that normally end with 'uh' as 'er' if the word after that one starts with an 'a.'

For example
Mellis'er' and I

Chug a Bug
10-07-11, 16:53
I know this is an older thread, but I just found an example. :tea:

Toby pronounces "Calcutta" as "Calcutter" at 0:51. :p

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=shB4nDTkyOE&NR=1



x

But americans would pronounce "Calcutta" as "Calcudd-uh" Whats with the replacing "T"'s with "D"'s anyhow?

You say "tomaydo" and I say "tomarto".... etc. :p

I find it amazing how many different accents there are in England, and yet it's almost always understandable. Try learning Dutch and then come over to Belgium here. I guarantee that you won't understand a word :D

Thats because they're only accents and not dialects. Try listening to Lallans or Scots Doric or some other dialect of English and I guarantee you'll hardly understand a word of it. ;)

TRexbait
10-07-11, 17:11
My sister is Melissa.

I just say twat though. :ton:

^^ Would that be pronounced twat or twert? :p

:vlol:

As for the thread, I've never heard this replacing of "ah" or "uh" sounds with "er". Well, maybe I have, but not with the hard American pronunciation of the sound. :confused:

Miharu
10-07-11, 17:15
Hey all. :)

I was watching It's Me or the Dog (one of my favourite shows), and there was a woman namd Melissa. However, Victoria (who is English) pronounced her name "Melisser". I've noticed this a lot with British people: they say words that end in A as if they end in ER. I was watching a British music show once and the host said Lady GaGa's name "Lady Gager".

Are there any English people who do this and/or can tell me why? Is it just how the British do things? :p

Thanks. :)


x

It's just the way some of us pronounce things, I know load of people who say: "meliss-Uh."

Although I say: "Meliss-a" can't say i take after my family or the local area because most or all of them say it with an uh. Also us Brits mumble alot when we talk. :)