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DarkHawk
26-11-11, 22:57
I'm at that juncture. Halfway done with Senior Year, and its been time to get your college applications in right away. Everyone's hustling and meeting deadlines. This one's going to NYU, this one's going to BU, and this one's going to Community College.

And I'm here, caught in the midst of it. Deeply confused and misguided about the whole thing. I've lived every waking moment of my school career doing everything i could to get into the best possible college. Thats all its been since Elementary School. College College College. Get great grades, ace you're tests, extracurriculars, do everything you can to stand out so you can get into a good college.

Thats what school has done for us, assume we're going to college and drill it into our heads to do so. Why are we not told any other alternative? College is the most expensive its ever been and degrees are becoming more and more useless.

I don't know what to think about College any more. I've always assumed I would go, because thats just how its done. But now I'm here, and i have my doubts about it. At the same time, I don't know what i would do without it.

So the question I want to ask is, what do you think the practicality of College is in the U.S. today? And is it worth the debt if you can't afford it?

Cochrane
26-11-11, 23:16
I have no idea how useful college is in the US, to be honest. But I'd like to make one observation: It matters what kind of degree you get. If you get sociology, art history or "something with media", then yes, that is money that you will not get back in the work place. On the other hand, a degree in engineering, computer science, natural science and the like can and will be a very, very useful thing. Also, it is way more fun.

patriots88888
26-11-11, 23:17
There's always alternatives, don't let them fool ya into believing there isn't. Furthering your education can be a great (as well as useful) thing but it's by no means the only path to success and happiness. My suggestion: Ask around and search out all your possibilities before jumping into something you might have regrets about later on.

Mad Tony
26-11-11, 23:33
I have no idea how useful college is in the US, to be honest. But I'd like to make one observation: It matters what kind of degree you get. If you get sociology, art history or "something with media", then yes, that is money that you will not get back in the work place. On the other hand, a degree in engineering, computer science, natural science and the like can and will be a very, very useful thing. Also, it is way more fun.Speaking of subjects, I always hear the same ones being mentioned as good and bad degrees but what about politics and IR? Is it somewhere in between? :p

larafan25
26-11-11, 23:33
I have no idea how useful college is in the US, to be honest. But I'd like to make one observation: It matters what kind of degree you get. If you get sociology, art history or "something with media", then yes, that is money that you will not get back in the work place. On the other hand, a degree in engineering, computer science, natural science and the like can and will be a very, very useful thing. Also, it is way more fun.

So what does this even mean? :confused:

People shouldn't go for careers in those areas?

If that's the case the world is ****. ._.

DarkHawk
26-11-11, 23:41
Well, my deal is I like to many things. I like most subjects, math, science, English, art, heck Gym fine too. But I don't know what I want. I have no doubts that whatever I do, if i do my best, I'll excel and things will work out.

So does that mean i have to go to college? Or should I? I orient towards the art sector though. My favorite subjects are English, Biology, art and History. Most Liberal Arts degrees aren't useful, thats what most people have told me anyway.

I thought about going to Art School, but theres that question again. Whats the point of that? Especially since I'd be going into massive debt.

I'm a creative person, and I can make myself a successful future, I have no doubt about that, but does college fit into the picture? I just don't know.

Cochrane
26-11-11, 23:46
Speaking of subjects, I always hear the same ones being mentioned as good and bad degrees but what about politics and IR? Is it somewhere in between? :pThe long and short of it is: Hell if I know. :D

In general, I would not like to say good degrees and bad degrees. If a degree makes someone happy and is about something they are interested in, then clearly it has some value. Just not always when it comes to getting a well-paying job.

So what does this even mean? :confused:

People shouldn't go for careers in those areas?

If that's the case the world is ****. ._.
I'm saying that most people who study something like that will end up doing a job for which they don't actually need that particular degree (although they may need to be smart enough to get a college degree in general). If that is fine with them, then that's fine (although in a general society sense, I think more people should study technology. Our advantage over China, what remains of it, is not based on us having better PR people). On the other hand, if their plan is to actually work as an art historian, then yes, they should probably rethink it.

Mad Tony
27-11-11, 00:53
So what does this even mean? :confused:

People shouldn't go for careers in those areas?

If that's the case the world is ****. ._.He never said that.

He's saying that in general those types of degrees will be valued less by potential employers. Remember, a lot of people go into careers that are different to what they did their degree in.

patriots88888
27-11-11, 00:59
He never said that.

He's saying that in general those types of degrees will be valued less by potential employers. Remember, a lot of people go into careers that are different to what they did their degree in.

Actually, it's more about demand, not value. I think that's what you meant to say.

trlestew
27-11-11, 01:22
I'm still pondering whether college is right for me.
Unless you are a rich person, you are going to have to use loans, have debts, or earn all the scholarships you can to pay for a good tuition for college from what I've heard. I question, is it really worth it? I'm starting to believe that college is just if you really want to advance your knowledge on your major, or specialize in a field which requires college degrees. Let's not forget how many students drop out of college. Trade schools and investing on the other hand can lead you to become an entrepreneur, and actually earn more money in the long term than all those students who went to college. Also, there is not a big demand for many office jobs as it is not exactly what America needs.

Then again, I figure I'm the most inexperienced person in this thread, so take this lightly.

Mad Tony
27-11-11, 01:30
Actually, it's more about demand, not value. I think that's what you meant to say.Nope. Demand is also a factor but not the only one. Many of the "bad" degrees listed above are seen as easier, therefore less valuable. I'm not saying this is the case all the time but it's definitely a factor.

patriots88888
27-11-11, 01:36
Nope. Demand is also a factor but not the only one. Many of the "bad" degrees listed above are seen as easier, therefore less valuable. I'm not saying this is the case all the time but it's definitely a factor.

As it pertains to the OP (employment) it is to do with whether there is adequate demand in those areas of study. Just because the demand may be less (or even nill), the educational (true) value of the degree doesn't diminish.

Mad Tony
27-11-11, 01:40
As it pertains to the OP (employment) it is to do with whether there is adequate demand in those areas of study. Just because the demand may be less (or even nill), the educational (true) value of the degree doesn't diminish.It's not just about demand. As I already explained, some degrees will naturally be valued more by employers becuase of the skills learned and the perceived "easiness" of it.

patriots88888
27-11-11, 01:47
It's not just about demand. As I already explained, some degrees will naturally be valued more by employers becuase of the skills learned and the perceived "easiness" of it.

Which employers? If there is a demand in the field in which those degrees pertain to then those respective employers will see the value in them. I fail to see what's so difficult to understand about that. :/

Eros5th
27-11-11, 02:15
Depends what degree you get. I'm going to graduate school to get a degree in something that's highly in demand and would command me twice the salary of my BA. So I think that's a loan worth taking.

TombRaiderFan.
27-11-11, 08:24
I suggest you go to a community college first, that's way cheaper. You can do your first two years there and then transfer to finish and get your BA or BS in a four year university.

I know where you're coming from with your concern, I'm in the same boat. I'm about to finish my Fall semester and only have my Spring semester until I transfer to an university. My parents are helping me because they don't want me to end up with a loan before I even get a degree (which I also suggest, you don't want to be enslaved paying a loan at such a young age). I honestly can't get around why it's so expensive, but it just is. For example here in California the UC system is super expensive, so I'm looking into going to a CSU instead.

I agree with previous comments, it really depends on the degree you're going for. If you get some bull crap degree like in arts, or fashion design then you might as well roll it up and smoke it.

Going to school in this system makes me wish I could move to Europe or Korea. =/

Mad Tony
27-11-11, 11:09
Which employers? If there is a demand in the field in which those degrees pertain to then those respective employers will see the value in them. I fail to see what's so difficult to understand about that. :/I'm not denying that, I'm just saying that in general employers will value an engineering degree over a media studies one, for example. Whether it's right or wrong, some degrees are more valuable to have when applying for jobs.

Dennis's Mom
27-11-11, 12:17
Depends what degree you get. I'm going to graduate school to get a degree in something that's highly in demand and would command me twice the salary of my BA. So I think that's a loan worth taking.

Petroleum Engineering would pay for itself in a year probably. Drama . . . never. :D

I suggest you go to a community college first, that's way cheaper. You can do your first two years there and then transfer to finish and get your BA or BS in a four year university.


I highly recommend this. English 1301 is English 1301. Why pay more for it?

Encore
27-11-11, 12:23
I've always assumed I would go, because thats just how its done. But now I'm here, and i have my doubts about it. At the same time, I don't know what i would do without it.

I completely sympathize with you. I too went to College because "everyone does", but now I regret doing it, because the years I spent earning an education were actually years I could have spent working and gaining work experience (and money). Of course I did have a part time job but it paid like **** and was only for simple expenses.

That being said, I don't think the system here works like in the US.

Going to College here doesn't guarantee you anything, a big chunk of youth unemployment is from people who graduated and are desperately trying to find a job in their field.
I studied Political Science but I'm working at a telecom...... :X

This might be a stereotype that's far from reality (if it is I'd love for american members to clarify) but I've always had the impression that Universities in the US are an almost guaranteed ticket to a good job.

If so, I'd say it's worth it.

Goose
27-11-11, 16:56
If you study the core skills such as English, maths and Science at university in whatever form, your going to get a job. Alot of other subjects, although possibly fun, run the risk of being useless.

You could always go into apprenticeships and get payed as you learn.

Ward Dragon
27-11-11, 17:28
This might be a stereotype that's far from reality (if it is I'd love for american members to clarify) but I've always had the impression that Universities in the US are an almost guaranteed ticket to a good job.

That's just what they tell us while we're growing up XD At least from my experience in the current economy, most good jobs don't care at all about an undergraduate degree. They usually want years of experience or an advanced degree before they'll even interview the applicant.

That's probably a side effect of the high unemployment rate (more applicants overall means they can be more picky about who they interview) but it's hell on young people who just graduated college and are trying to find their first real job.

I tried looking for a recent article about this and here's something from last May:

Employment rates for new college graduates have fallen sharply in the last two years, as have starting salaries for those who can find work. What’s more, only half of the jobs landed by these new graduates even require a college degree, reviving debates about whether higher education is “worth it” after all.http://www.nytimes.com/2011/05/19/business/economy/19grads.html?_r=1

Greenapple968
21-12-11, 01:41
I'm at that juncture. Halfway done with Senior Year, and its been time to get your college applications in right away. Everyone's hustling and meeting deadlines. This one's going to NYU, this one's going to BU, and this one's going to Community College.

And I'm here, caught in the midst of it. Deeply confused and misguided about the whole thing. I've lived every waking moment of my school career doing everything i could to get into the best possible college. Thats all its been since Elementary School. College College College. Get great grades, ace you're tests, extracurriculars, do everything you can to stand out so you can get into a good college.

Thats what school has done for us, assume we're going to college and drill it into our heads to do so. Why are we not told any other alternative? College is the most expensive its ever been and degrees are becoming more and more useless.

I don't know what to think about College any more. I've always assumed I would go, because thats just how its done. But now I'm here, and i have my doubts about it. At the same time, I don't know what i would do without it.

So the question I want to ask is, what do you think the practicality of College is in the U.S. today? And is it worth the debt if you can't afford it?

So we're questioning the importance of education?

Right, where to begin? A lot of people take the view that education is overrated, reason being that there are a lot of uneducated and unqualified people in this world who go on to become hugely successful millionaires. At the same time, you have people with fantastic GCSE's, A Levels and degrees who end up with average jobs at best. Obviously though this is only rarely the case and it's much better to have an education than to not have one, atleast in my opinion. I don't know a great deal about the US but I think the most important thing is to have a skill at something rather than a qualification in a particular subject.

Ward Dragon
21-12-11, 01:48
^ It's not that education is overrated. Rather it's that most colleges here are overpriced and do not adequately prepare students to get a career after they graduate. That leaves many recent graduates stuck because they are in massive debt and have trouble finding a job.

But I'm not trying to discourage anyone from going to college :) Just be careful, do your research, and choose a college that seems like it will prepare you for the career that you want.