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View Full Version : Alright, that frustrates me....>.>...this is serious...


RelicHunter
31-08-05, 17:15
I saw on TV, a news station featured a newspaper's headline saying "Our Tsunami." It was refering to the Katrina Hurricane. It's frustrateing to think that we as Americans would think that. Yes it was terriable, and hundreds of people are dead, thosands homeless. But there are millions homeless and jobless because the the tsunami, especially now orphaned children who are treatened by money hungry sex traders. There are hundreds of thosands dead because of the tsunami, and they are still trying to rebuild what may not be rebuilt for years because they don't have money like we do. We can not compare this to the Tsunami that apparently not many Americans cared for in the first place. I know this fact first hand being that I live here and saw plenty of Tsunami Fund drives not raise much over a few hundred dollars. I know that an American dollar can build an entire house in some countrys, but thats not the reason for such small funds. Its the reason that many Americans did not care, let alone even know what a Tsunami was and many are still clueless.

I want to see what anyone else thinks, American or not, please tell me what you think.

interstellardave
31-08-05, 17:48
The US helps whenever there are disasters; sometimes people say we should do more but that's because more is always expected of the US! We're viewed as a bottomless money-pit. Meanwhile, people on this forum are BARELY even talking about this disaster. This is only the second topic I've seen about it and this one exists just to criticize the US!

Draco
31-08-05, 18:00
I'm not sure exactly what I am supposed to do when I can barely afford my own life atm.

Catlantean
31-08-05, 18:48
Katrina is a disaster, maybe lesser in magnitude than the tsunami but still so many people lost their homes homes and even their lives. I don't care if someone's making comparisons. Human beings are human beings and I feel sorry when they're getting hurt like this, no matter of their nationality. I wish there was something I could do...

sshh
31-08-05, 20:07
URRGGGGGGGHHHHH!!!!!!!

DREWY
31-08-05, 23:40
I seem to remember famous people fundraising for the Tsunami in the US. How successful they were I don't know. A lot of people get caught up in the emotion of the time and pledge money they never can afford (and thus don't pay) so the total given can be misleading.
Australia for example, pledged 1 billion dollars to the region but as to how much actually reaches those in need is debateable.
An interesting question is, as Dave put it, with the US being viewed as a bottomless pit, how many countries will offer help back (even though the US probably would't accept).
As far as people not talking about this, well a lot of people here could be too young to grasp the enormity of what has happened or prefer to keep their opinions to themselves. Doesn't mean that they care any less.

Camera Obscura
01-09-05, 00:11
Originally posted by SydneyFox:
Its the reason that many Americans did not care, let alone even know what a Tsunami was and many are still clueless.
I once kept my opinions to myself but now I love to share it, even blurt it out. And this is one of those blurt out opinions.

Not everyone has the money to donate. With gas prices going up, supposedly another 30 cents per gallon, and cutting into other budgets for it some people cannot afford to give much, but it's not only about money here, there are clothes and food drives going on and my class was thinking of asking my school to have one to help the Red Cross.

I don't think it seems right to say Americans don't care IN GENERAL, and some are helping with food/clothes drive if they can't afford to pitch in money. I honestly think people can't give more than what they have. Although I'm 14 and may not know how the economy fully works but I do know when people have eletric, water, gas, and telephone bills to pay, rents, food, insurance, the children's needs as in school supplies, and the ever so popular taxes.

Being that said, I do agree, people expect too much out of the U.S. Like there aren't 100 other countries that can help as well. :rolleyes:

[ 01. September 2005, 01:18: Message edited by: Camera Obscura ]

Flipper1987
01-09-05, 02:59
Originally posted by SydneyFox:
We can not compare this to the Tsunami that apparently not many Americans cared for in the first place. I know this fact first hand being that I live here and saw plenty of Tsunami Fund drives not raise much over a few hundred dollars. I know that an American dollar can build an entire house in some countrys, but thats not the reason for such small funds. Its the reason that many Americans did not care, let alone even know what a Tsunami was and many are still clueless.Do you actually know how much $ was raised by private US citizens & donated to the Tsunami relief fund, the Red Cross, and other humanitarian organizations? I don't know the exact figures but it was considerable. It certainly was not the paltry sum that you think it is.

And to suggest that many Americans don't care or are too stupid to understand what a Tsunami is & its effects on South East Asia is an irresponsible leap on your part

FLIPPER - who's looking to build a house for $1.

[ 01. September 2005, 04:00: Message edited by: Flipper1987 ]

Greenkey2
01-09-05, 10:13
I agree on some of your points, Camera Obscura - especially about the common misunderstanding that blanket statements 'this/that country doesn't care....' apply to EVERYONE who lives there.

The are lots of caring, thoughtful, considerate and concerned people in the world. The sad fact is that, when a relief-operation for a disaster such as the tsunami or Katrina is underway, it is far easier to critisise and point the finger of blame than it is to appreciate the good work being done by a quiet minority.

These acts of communities working together to shelter and rebuild are too often over-shadowed by Thatcherite capitalism from 'rich' country governments and popular media. The world CAN and DOES have the resources to quickly and efficiently limit the aftermath of natural/man-made disasters. Sadly, it is too often the case that sheer bloody-mindedness and corporate bureaucracy gets in the way.

However, I have to point out that in Britain the cost of a litre of petrol is about 95p, and diesel is commonly around 1 per litre. Talk about the cost of living, eh? :rolleyes: