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View Full Version : At least, Shampoo is always white


D3M0N
15-04-06, 14:38
I was just tanking a shower when this question came to my mind:
The colors of Shampoo are countless but after all they all turn white... Why?

YvesSL
15-04-06, 14:43
I have orange which turned my highlights yellow :mad:

jarhead
15-04-06, 14:55
because the colourings arnt very strong when to lather it on your skin :confused: :confused: well thats what i thought

Celephais
15-04-06, 14:58
Shampoos use lanthanum phosphate as an emmolient and this reacts with the small amounts of zinc diethyldithiocarbamate found in tap water to produce stearyl linolenyl phosphatidate, which is white.

jarhead
15-04-06, 15:01
yes of course it does. i was just about to say that myself. well those long words must be the truth so i think celephais has the correct answer.:tmb: but i dont know what the correct answer is. i read that and thought shampoo must be dangerous to your skin with all those words etc

EK-MDi
15-04-06, 15:15
Shampoos use lanthanum phosphate as an emmolient and this reacts with the small amounts of zinc diethyldithiocarbamate found in tap water to produce stearyl linolenyl phosphatidate, which is white.
Are you some sort of Chemistry scientist? Do you have a PhD? This forum is really full of a lot of clever people, hehe.

Lara Lover
15-04-06, 15:15
I have just white shampoo!

D3M0N
15-04-06, 15:22
thanks for the answers... learned a bit more...

Celephais
15-04-06, 15:26
I just made it up really. You shouldn't be impressed with big words. :p

jarhead
15-04-06, 15:27
oh well it sounded scientific and perfectly true to us.

Geck-o-Lizard
15-04-06, 15:35
I'd be guessing it's because when the shampoo's in the bottle, it's all liquid. If you add a little bit of water to the contents of the bottle and shake it about a bit, the colour lightens and it goes a bit opaque (and if you leave the bottle for a while, the bubbles disappear and the colour goes back to the way it was before). When you add the water, it loosens up the shampoo and allows it to trap air, i.e. bubbles, under the surface of the shampoo, and though individual bubbles look see-through, when there's lots of them, they act like frosting on a window and reflect light back. So when you lather your hair, the shampoo itself becomes diluted a lot, and on top of that, a lot of air gets trapped in the liquid as millions of little bubbles; the shampoo is spread out too thin for the colouring to be visible any more, and you see the light reflected from the bubbles instead.

Of course I could be way off the mark. :p

frostfur452
15-04-06, 15:51
Gee, who knew slimy liquid goop that goes in your hair could be soooo complex haha

Celephais
15-04-06, 15:57
Actually my first reaction to the question is "who cares?" but it's gotten me wondering too (to my dismay). Gillette shave gel seems to have the same properties- at first it's blue or green but if you spread it it goes white. And there's no bubbles in it, so I'm not sure if Gecko's bubble theory is correct.