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View Full Version : Is Alister a common name?


TrojanMan
18-04-06, 19:22
It isn't here in America, but what about in Britian? Because Alister is a badass name. If I ever have a kid, I'm going to name him Alister (or Alice if it's a she).

Croft06
18-04-06, 19:23
I know one Alister, not dead common, but there are a few about

MisterCroft
18-04-06, 19:28
I wouldnt say it was a common name.

Thorir
18-04-06, 19:29
I'm not British, but I wouldn't say it's common...

I like it, though. :)

Elysia
18-04-06, 19:29
Alistair is the common spelling, but it's a pretty common name in the UK. It's normally associated with the middle classes here - it's a bit of a 'Grammar School' name, but I like it anyways. :)

Croft06
18-04-06, 19:30
Alistair is the common spelling, but it's a pretty common name in the UK. It's normally associated with the middle classes here - it's a bit of a 'Grammar School' name, but I like it anyways. :)

I go to a Grammar school where I know the Alister I know... haha. I don't actually know how he spells it, he goes by Ali

Elysia
18-04-06, 19:33
I thnk most people called Alistair tend to get called Ali at some point in their lives!

I went to school with a couple of Alistairs, and worked with one too. ;)

Natla'd
18-04-06, 19:38
I knew a very horrible boy called Alister, which has given me bad connotations of the name. He certainly wasn't grammar school-y.

The name isn't that common here (south midlands), but it's not smack-you-in-the-face outrageous either.

tha_mattster
18-04-06, 19:40
I've never seen it spelt Alister, always Allaister

Elysia
18-04-06, 19:41
I knew a very horrible boy called Alister, which has given me bad connotations of the name. He certainly wasn't grammar school-y.

The name isn't that common here (south midlands), but it's not smack-you-in-the-face outrageous either.
It's a shame when that happens to a name. I could never call any daughter of mine Amber for the same reason - love the name, but I teach a dreadful, dreadful child of the same name!

I do think it's more of a 'soft Southerner' name, though. You kind of associate it with leafy Hampshire (although, I have to say, the part of Hampshire I'm from is not leafy, nor that soft!!)

Croft06
18-04-06, 19:43
I do think it's more of a 'soft Southerner' name, though. You kind of associate it with leafy Hampshire (although, I have to say, the part of Hampshire I'm from is not leafy, nor that soft!!)

Surrey/Sussex-y too me, its quite a nice name, I like the whole formal English sounding names, not sure how formally English mine is

Elysia
18-04-06, 19:46
Surrey/Sussex-y too me, its quite a nice name, I like the whole formal English sounding names, not sure how formally English mine is
lol! Well, I went to school in Sussex (and live near the border), so that could possibly be why I find it to be quite a common name!

Croft06
18-04-06, 19:47
lol! Well, I went to school in Sussex (and live near the border), so that could possibly be why I find it to be quite a common name!


Oooh where in Sussex?

Elysia
18-04-06, 19:48
Oooh where in Sussex?
I went to school in Chichester (I'd like to live there some day, but it's sooo expensive! I grew up in a village just outside... oh, it was lovely. However, for now I have to make do with Portsmouth...)

Anubis_AF
18-04-06, 19:49
Moved to General Chat

Croft06
18-04-06, 19:50
I went to school in Chichester (I'd like to live there some day, but it's sooo expensive! I grew up in a village just outside... oh, it was lovely. However, for now I have to make do with Portsmouth...)

Ahhh fantastic, I was in Chichester this afternoon. Always interesting finding someone close to home!

ace_85
18-04-06, 19:56
I went to school in Chichester (I'd like to live there some day, but it's sooo expensive! I grew up in a village just outside... oh, it was lovely. However, for now I have to make do with Portsmouth...)

Ooh, Portsmouth...nice. No wonder you're having trouble with rebellious pupils :D

Forwen
18-04-06, 19:58
Anytime I hear such talking I swear to myself I'll spend at least a tiny bit of my life in England. It's just that I have no idea where this sentiment comes from.

Elysia
18-04-06, 20:06
Ahhh fantastic, I was in Chichester this afternoon. Always interesting finding someone close to home!
Chichester is a lovely place. I have a lot of history there...

It is indeed interesting to find people close to home! :hug:

Ooh, Portsmouth...nice. No wonder you're having trouble with rebellious pupils
You aren't wrong there!! Oh, they're lovely.... :rolleyes:

Anytime I hear such talking I swear to myself I'll spend at least a tiny bit of my life in England. It's just that I have no idea where this sentiment comes from.p
:D Come to England - Yes, it *is* that twee!!! ( We're only an ikkle Island... :D )

Croft06
18-04-06, 20:07
Chichester is a lovely place. I have a lot of history there...

It is indeed interesting to find people close to home! :hug:


Small world! (smaller island)

ace_85
18-04-06, 20:10
Anytime I hear such talking I swear to myself I'll spend at least a tiny bit of my life in England. It's just that I have no idea where this sentiment comes from.

Lol well I'm originally from Southampton which is about 20 miles down the coast from Portsmouth and our two towns are supposed to be bitter rivals, especially when it comes to football :D

Elysia
18-04-06, 20:20
Lol well I'm originally from Southampton which is about 20 miles down the coast from Portsmouth and our two towns are supposed to be bitter rivals, especially when it comes to football :D
Oi, Scummer!!!! :D :D :D

Ahhh, 'tis enough to bring a tear of happiness to your eye... :tmb:

Belfastard
18-04-06, 20:47
Alister is a common name here in Northern Ireland.

Lara Lover
18-04-06, 20:48
I don't think it's common. But, It's a great name :tmb:

Real Life Lara
18-04-06, 20:49
Pretty common round here... o_O

Tramp
18-04-06, 21:51
It used to be common here in Australia too. Probably from the heavy Irish contingent of convicts. Over the years like most of the older names it is now less common. Parents seem to give their kids really weird names now. Unfortunately the kids have to live with them for the rest of their lives.

Kamrusepas
18-04-06, 21:55
I think Aleister is cooler than Alister :D

xMiSsCrOfTx
18-04-06, 21:57
I think Aleister is cooler than Alister :D

And Kaevan cooler than Kevin? :p

I hadn't heard of anyone being named Alister until Legend.

Kamrusepas
18-04-06, 22:04
I was referring to a particular Aleister :p


I hadn't heard of anyone being named Alister until Legend.

Really? I thought it was a little bit more common...

Jacob x5
18-04-06, 22:06
I'm English. I really don't know to be honest. It's not extremely common; it's not uncommon. I myself don't know any Alisters.

Osojojo
18-04-06, 23:45
Alister is a weird way of spelling it!
But I know a very handsome Scottish man named Alistair. ;) Very smart, very nice, extremely easy to talk to, can you tell I have a crush on him? Haha.

Maureen Errant
19-04-06, 06:06
Don't know of one here in my neck of the woods (Canada) But I do know of a Kavan............to sound like have.......not like cave. Very nice redhead............with chestnut eyes.

jackles
19-04-06, 09:24
I always thought it was a scottish name...and spelt alistair..
so for me it either spells up visions of a blokey in a kilt...or some jolly prep school kid!

*waves at all the other southerners* I'm from bournemouth originally...

Neteru
19-04-06, 14:58
Alistair is the English form of Alasdair. Which in turn is the Scottish form of Alexander.

RAID
19-04-06, 15:02
I was gonna be named Alister. My dad loves that name, I don't. My uncle saved me. He told him that if he called me Alister, kids would call me Alice at school.

Nephili
19-04-06, 15:04
Im British and ive never known anyone to be called Alister.

Nicky
19-04-06, 15:09
Which in turn is the Scottish form of Alexander.
Wow! I didn't know that! :)

Elysia
19-04-06, 16:33
I was referring to a particular Aleister :p
"Do what thou wilt shall be the whole of the Law..."

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