PDA

View Full Version : Curious question to you Brits out there.


PirateRose
02-05-06, 03:39
I wanted to know if there was ever a time someone with an American accent spoke to you and you couldn't understand them.


XD Are there like any specific words that we seem to say wrong XD (i know a lot but I just want to see your view)

RoseTyler
02-05-06, 04:08
I don't think there's been anything I didn't understand (I can't remember just now) But you say tomato differently ;)

RedTyga
02-05-06, 04:30
I think we say a lot of things differently XD

But that is funny though, I too find it hard sometimes to understand what you Brits are saying, but I've never once had a British friend go "Huh? What was that?" When I say something, well, unless it's slang, but that's a different matter.

Maureen Errant
02-05-06, 04:42
The only thing I can think of is that you have different words for things. Up here in Canada we say bag.....down there (Spokane) you say sack.
We say Pop......you say soda.
We say Eh......you say huh.

Don't think that you donw there would say anything that I couldn't understand.........but then again I haven't been down there much:D

Jacob x5
02-05-06, 04:44
I can't stand the word 'jelo'.

DREWY
02-05-06, 04:47
When I saw the title I thought this was going to be one of those British
"I have a bath once a month whether I need it or not" threads. :D Sorry :ton:
My mum is Scottish and I have trouble with her over the phone. As for Americans, no, not that I can remember. But then again I'm an Aussie :tmb:

wantafanta
02-05-06, 13:27
I had a pen pal from New Zealand named Angie. She called me on the phone one night (4:00 AM). I couldn't understand a word she said. NZers speak English, but with a real Brit accent. I had to keep asking her to repeat. Plus, there was this annoying delay. It was a collect call and cost me $140! Most of the call was me saying "what?"

CerebralAssassin
02-05-06, 14:02
I wanted to know if there was ever a time someone with an American accent spoke to you and you couldn't understand them.


XD Are there like any specific words that we seem to say wrong XD (i know a lot but I just want to see your view)
it's usually the other way around:vlol:

Neteru
02-05-06, 14:22
As far as I can think I've never misunderstood, or been unable to understand what an American has said. I think we have such a heavy diet of American TV and films here that we are used to various American accents.

Zip
02-05-06, 14:23
Not at all i met a charming lady and well the accent made her even hotter

TombRaiderLover
02-05-06, 14:27
Is it me, or do British people sound so much posher in films then I or anyone in my area??? I hate it when Americans make fun of our accent and yet not all of us talk that way. Oh well.

Neteru
02-05-06, 14:41
LOL, well considering you're from Telford it's not surprising that your accent isn't much heard in American films. I'm quite sure Americans wouldn't understand it.

gazhammer
02-05-06, 14:50
When an American says Fanny they mean botom or bum, it means something else over here.;)

Also they use the term "Blew me off", which i suspect, means didnt turn up, or something similar, again over here, totally different meaning.;)

CerebralAssassin
02-05-06, 14:52
also:"rubbish"No american says rubbish..;)

jarhead
02-05-06, 15:43
i cant stand the amnerican for taps- i think it beigns with F or soemthing

Lew
02-05-06, 15:47
We say fit you say hot, well we say both but still
we say snogging you say kissing
you jello we say jelly

and actually everyone in my school (except for those geeks) have a shower everyday so..... :D

Lara Lover
02-05-06, 15:54
Nope, But, I have Candian cousins who come here alot of times. And, I'm just like :eek: Why did I never speak like that anymore?

BTW, I was born and lived in Canada for 5 Years so ;)

Lew
02-05-06, 15:55
You picked up the accent, like i might want to do in America :P but then i'll sound like all the rest and it wont be unique

Lavinder
02-05-06, 15:58
Most of our tv programs are American so growing up listening to thier voices it is just like normal :)

Greenkey2
02-05-06, 16:02
I find the southern U.S accent quite difficult to understand. Mind you, my idea of torture is having to listen to Eastenders (where everyone seems indifferenet to "th", instead they use "f") Such misuse of the english language should be punishable by having your nose hairs burned out one by one IMO). Quite 'orrible in me own opinion, like :p

As my grandad once famously said, "There's no f in cathedral!!" (try saying that when you're drunk ;)

CerebralAssassin
02-05-06, 16:05
I find the southern U.S accent quite difficult to understand. Mind you, my idea of torture is having to listen to Eastenders (where everyone seems indifferenet to "th", instead they use "f") Such misuse of the english language should be punishable by having your nose hairs burned out one by one IMO). Quite 'orrible in me own opinion, like :p

As my grandad once famously said, "There's no f in cathedral!!" (try saying that when you're drunk ;)
it's a workout trying to understand southern americans for me too:tmb: and I'm american:o

Apofiss
02-05-06, 16:28
A very long time ago I had a funny situation in of the UK's shop center... after paying for my dvd, shop assistant said "cheers!" ...I was like "excuse me!" lol :D Well it's not about US accent tho, nut well.. :p

gazhammer
02-05-06, 16:30
i cant stand the amnerican for taps- i think it beigns with F or soemthing

Fawcett?. No i'm not American!.:p

Lew
02-05-06, 16:35
I like the way Americans say "Center" :P

CerebralAssassin
02-05-06, 16:44
I like the way Americans say "Center" :P
what's so interesting about that?:p

Lew
02-05-06, 16:54
Dunno

CerebralAssassin
02-05-06, 17:07
hehe..us american's don't like to pronounce 't' 's:p

Paul H
02-05-06, 17:19
what's so interesting about that?:p

That is how they spell the word, whereas Brits spell it "centre" due to early French influence over the language.

There are lots of words that are spelled differently between the two countries, some of which involve the letters "s" and "z", so you have such as "realize" (US) and "realise" (UK). The letters "s" and "c" are also used in place of each other depending on the version of the language. e.g. "defense" (US) and "defence" (UK). Another is "cheque" (UK) (French influence again) or "check" (US).

gazhammer
02-05-06, 17:22
That is how they spell the word, whereas Brits spell it "centre" due to early French influence over the language.

There are lots of words that are spelled differently between the two countries, some of which involve the letters "s" and "z", so you have such as "realize" (US) and "realise" (UK). The letters "s" and "c" are also used in place of each other depending on the version of the language. e.g. "defense" (US) and "defence" (UK). Another is "cheque" (UK) or "check" (US).

Also Colour(Brit) Color(Yank) and Aeroplane(Brit) Airplane(Yank).;)

AnthonyShock1515
02-05-06, 17:22
Im not bothered, I don't like Americans that much.

gazhammer
02-05-06, 17:23
Im not bothered, I don't like Americans that much.

Can it Geordie Boy!!!.:D

l@r@ cr0ft
02-05-06, 17:23
ive always understood how hte americans talk

im english but i have ALOT of aussie relatives and i understand them too

saray
02-05-06, 17:24
When an American says Fanny they mean botom or bum, it means something else over here.;)

Also they use the term "Blew me off", which i suspect, means didnt turn up, or something similar, again over here, totally different meaning.;)

:vlol: is strange how the same words can mean different things on different sides of the world :confused: :p

gazhammer
02-05-06, 17:25
ive always understood how hte americans talk

im english but i have ALOT of aussie relatives and i understand them too

Sorry, i didnt understand that?.:confused: ..... :D

AnthonyShock1515
02-05-06, 17:27
Can it Geordie Boy!!!.:D#

shutup:o

Lonely Istari
02-05-06, 17:42
The only thing I can think of is that you have different words for things. Up here in Canada we say bag.....down there (Spokane) you say sack.
We say Pop......you say soda.
We say Eh......you say huh.

Don't think that you donw there would say anything that I couldn't understand.........but then again I haven't been down there much:D

I guess Ohioans are like Canadians... :p us Midwestern chaps from the US get ripped on for calling it pop. :hea: My friends in Virginia used to make fun of me all the time! lol and sack? ... I never say that. I always say bag. lol :pi:

Interesting topic. I love this kind of stuff! (i'm obsessed w/ English speaking accents)

Lonely Istari
02-05-06, 17:58
I hate it when Americans make fun of our accent and yet not all of us talk that way. Oh well.

Same for us when Brits make fun of our accents. :rolleyes:

by the way, I never make fun of Brit accents because I think they are all adorable. :hug:

Elysia
02-05-06, 17:59
I understand Americans okay. It's people in my own country I don't understand (well... the ones who live north of the South Downs, anyway.... :ton: )

T-Raider
02-05-06, 18:17
I find it farley easy to understand :)

TombRaiderLover
02-05-06, 19:05
LOL, well considering you're from Telford it's not surprising that your accent isn't much heard in American films. I'm quite sure Americans wouldn't understand it.


:confused: Personally, I think an American would find my accent easy to understand.

tha_mattster
02-05-06, 19:15
Americans are easy to understand as they are never off the teleovision and radio.

RoseTyler
02-05-06, 19:15
Americans say meer instead of mirror. :p

MiCkiZ88
02-05-06, 19:20
not british but.. I use both accents.. some times I like to tease my friends with perfect english :ton:

tha_mattster
02-05-06, 19:24
American english is not as easy to the ear as UK english though. What about those travelling tips telling them how to behave abroad! How rude is that to tell to your citizens!

Lenochka
02-05-06, 22:08
i dont find any accent hard to understand anymore ( seen so many t.A.T.u. interviews with broken english. im use to it now XD ) I dont find british accents odd why would you find american accents odd? someone said you have U.S. TV shows guess what the only british TV shows i have seen are these little comedy shows on Channel 12 ( A.K.A. my 84 year old grandma's favorite channel... i have not been exposed to alot of british people in person and i still find there way of talk normal. Wait... Brits make fun of our accents XD had no idea they did that XD

Lara Lover
02-05-06, 22:09
Americans say meer instead of mirror. :p

:vlol:

Lenochka
02-05-06, 22:11
what? i say meer-or ( dosnt exactly sound like that but you know what i mean ) not meer and im american...

Lara Lover
02-05-06, 22:14
It's Mirror. Not Meer. You would have to say Mer-er to sound like Mirror ;)

Lenochka
02-05-06, 22:19
whatever ;P same thing basically.

RoseTyler
02-05-06, 23:06
Meer. :p

:vlol:

Lenochka
02-05-06, 23:09
:p hehe i shall give it a go....

" Are you mad dont bloooooody say that " :p ;)

SSJ6Wolf
02-05-06, 23:23
Do British people learn different continents? I was talking with someone from Britain who was surprised that I didn't know that there was a continent called "Oceana" (I think) where Australia was. But I was always taught that Australia was its own continent! :confused: Is that a regional difference?

CerebralAssassin
02-05-06, 23:24
Do British people learn different continents? I was talking with someone from Britain who was surprised that I didn't know that there was a continent called "Oceana" (I think) where Australia was. But I was always taught that Australia was its own continent! :confused: Is that a regional difference?
no.Australia is NOT it's own continent..:p

RedTyga
03-05-06, 00:04
I wanna respond to some posts, this topic has grown during the course of the day XD

I pronounce mirror "meer-err", or, if I prefer to talk in my "ghetto, Ebonics, black, whatever you wanna call it" accent, "meer-uh". The only American accent I think of who would pronounce it just meer, is hick accent (different from southern accent, hick accents really make you sound stupid).

Americans don't say fanny at all, unless we're talking about a fanny pack. When we say someone "blew me off" we are saying that someone ditched us, didn't show up, or ignored us, but we do use that other ... term for the verb blow for something else as well.

Jelly in America pretty much is jam, you know, the stuff you put with peanut butter to make PB&J sandwiches.

Gazhammer, I hate being called a yank, as do some other Americans. I personally don't like it because here, a yank or Yankee is something specific, either you're a Northerner, or more specifically, you're from New England. I'm not a Northerner therefore; I do not consider myself a Yankee, so it annoys me to no end when someone constantly refers to me as one. You probably wouldn't get a very good reaction from Southerners either if you referred to them as a yank (the whole Civil War thing >_>)

I also think that the standard American accent is easier to understand by all is because we have a "flat" accent, that is, we don't over or under pronounce anything, where as some English accents seem to overpronounce or stress your vowels more and drop your Rs. Also what's interesting is that when people sing in English, they seem to have an American accent, well, unless English isn't their native tongue.

And lastely, correct me if I'm wrong on some of these, but here are other word differences:
The equivalent of Pants in the US is trousers in the UK (pants mean underwear there, right?)
French fries in the US are chips in the UK, chips in terms of food in the US refer to Fritos, Cheetos, Doritos, Lays, etc. (what do you call that?)
English muffins in the US are crumpets in the UK.

RoseTyler
03-05-06, 00:12
French fries in the US are chips in the UK, chips in terms of food in the US refer to Fritos, Cheetos, Doritos, Lays, etc. (what do you call that?)

We have fries AND chips in the UK :p Fries are just fries (long and thin) they're smaller than chips. Chips are fatter and more potato-ey :D

Dorito's are just Dorito's. Potato chips are called Crisps.

RedTyga
03-05-06, 00:22
We have fries AND chips in the UK :p Fries are just fries (long and thin) they're smaller than chips. Chips are fatter and more potato-ey :D

Dorito's are just Dorito's. Potato chips are called Crisps.

So you call chips (US) fries (UK), besides potato chips which are crisps, and fries (US) chips (UK)?

CerebralAssassin
03-05-06, 00:24
Also what's interesting is that when people sing in English, they seem to have an American accent, well, unless English isn't their native tongue.
yeah..I've noticed that too..how is that?:confused:

(pants mean underwear there, right?)
:vlol: WTF? I didn't know that..

RoseTyler
03-05-06, 00:25
So you call chips (US) fries (UK), besides potato chips which are crisps, and fries (US) chips (UK)?

lol ok this is getting confusing :p

Fries (US) are fries (UK) and also chips. But chips are different to fries, I don't even know if you guys in the US actually have chips, or at least what we call chips. They're bigger and quite different to fries although they're still pretty much the same thing (thick-sliced potatoes cooked in greasy fat) :p

chips (US) are those flat crunchy potato things you get in packets yes? We call them Crisps in the UK. :D

RedTyga
03-05-06, 00:26
:vlol: WTF? I didn't know that..

Lol, *shrugs* it's what some Englander told me. I was talking about my pants and he said they mean underwear there.

RoseTyler
03-05-06, 00:26
:vlol: WTF? I didn't know that..

LMAO! Yeah... pants :p Knickers! :ton: :vlol:

Night Crawler
03-05-06, 00:27
French fries in the US are chips in the UKNope, we have french fries here too, chips are different, fatter, shorter and more...greasy lol.

DREWY
03-05-06, 00:28
no.Australia is NOT it's own continent..:p
Australia IS its own continent. ;) The worlds largest island too.

CerebralAssassin
03-05-06, 00:28
lol ok this is getting confusing :p

Fries (US) are fries (UK) and also chips. But chips are different to fries, I don't even know if you guys in the US actually have chips, or at least what we call chips. They're bigger and quite different to fries although they're still pretty much the same thing (thick-sliced potatoes cooked in greasy fat) :p

chips (US) are those flat crunchy potato things you get in packets yes? We call them Crisps in the UK. :D
I know what you're talking about..those big-arse fries (US) right?:D we have them here..

RoseTyler
03-05-06, 00:28
Nope, we have french fries here too, chips are different, fatter, shorter and more...greasy lol.

Thats what I just said :p LOL

RoseTyler
03-05-06, 00:29
I know what you're talking about..those big-arse fries (US) right?:D we have them here..

You do?! ooh :D ....but do you get fish & chip shops? ;)

Night Crawler
03-05-06, 00:29
Thats what I just said :p LOLI know lol, I clicked on this thread ages ago but got distracted, then never refreshed before I posted :o

CerebralAssassin
03-05-06, 00:31
Australia IS its own continent. ;) The worlds largest island too.
then what about those tiny little islands in the pacific,where do they belong?:p

RedTyga
03-05-06, 00:33
lol ok this is getting confusing :p

Fries (US) are fries (UK) and also chips. But chips are different to fries, I don't even know if you guys in the US actually have chips, or at least what we call chips. They're bigger and quite different to fries although they're still pretty much the same thing (thick-sliced potatoes cooked in greasy fat) :p

chips (US) are those flat crunchy potato things you get in packets yes? We call them Crisps in the UK. :D

Oh, OK. We do have those kinda chips (UK), we call them potato wedges or steak fries, and yes, chips in the US is the crisps apparentely. Do you guys have salsa chips? Those are the flat crisps, but they're the Mexican kind and you dip them in salsa or guacamole.

Night Crawler
03-05-06, 00:35
Oh, OK. We do have those kinda chips (UK), we call them potato wedgesWe have wedges too, they're even fatter than chips! Lol.

RoseTyler
03-05-06, 00:35
Oh, OK. We do have those kinda chips (UK), we call them potato wedges or steak fries, and yes, chips in the US is the crisps apparentely. Do you guys have salsa chips? Those are the flat crisps, but they're the Mexican kind and you dip them in salsa or guacamole.

We have potato wedges too! Those are a bit different to chips, they're crescent shaped and I think they're cooked with the potato skin still on.

We have Dorito's and can buy dips for those too. They're the only Mexican kinda crisp thingys I know of. :D

Night Crawler
03-05-06, 00:37
Aah. I give you, the British chip.

http://www.uknet.com/showcase/BritishFood/fish_chips1.sized.jpg

RedTyga
03-05-06, 00:40
We have potato wedges too! Those are a bit different to chips, they're crescent shaped and I think they're cooked with the potato skin still on.

We have Dorito's and can buy dips for those too. They're the only Mexican kinda crisp thingys I know of. :D

Oh, yeah, then I guess we don't have chips. Dorito's are basically the American(?) flavored version of Mexican crisps.

Just saw you're post Night Crawler, we do have those fries. We just call them fries, no difference from their smaller cousins :D

RoseTyler
03-05-06, 00:41
LOL and wedgies! :jmp: http://www.multix.com.au/recipes/wedges.jpg

Belfastard
03-05-06, 00:44
Aah. I give you, the British chip.

http://www.uknet.com/showcase/BritishFood/fish_chips1.sized.jpg

I would love that right now! http://www.planetsmilies.com/smilies/happy/happy0166.gif

Forwen
03-05-06, 00:45
Scary. I have no faintest idea how these things are called even in Polish. Provided they're "called" at all.

LiquidKal
03-05-06, 00:51
Australia is its own continent, the smallest continent in the world.

The pacific islands, New Zealand and such are part of the Oceania or Australasia region, it seems to be called both, im not sure what the distinction is.

I'm an Australian myself and although I was pretty sure it was its own continent, I still had to look it up. That how lazy we are, don't even know stuff about our own country :D

Australian English seems to include words from both British and American English, but with all the British spellings I believe. I've never had a problem with most British or American accents, with the exception of the Southern American accent. I knew a girl from Alabama once, haven't seen her in years, but I could hardly understand a damn thing she said!

Forwen
03-05-06, 00:55
LOL and wedgies! :jmp: http://www.multix.com.au/recipes/wedges.jpg

Come on, Wedge is a character from SW :p In my vocabulary, it's "a potato treated with heat somehow so that it's kind of tender inside and resembles a dried apple being edible only with ketchup", if I remember right.

RoseTyler
03-05-06, 01:28
Come on, Wedge is a character from SW :p In my vocabulary, it's "a potato treated with heat somehow so that it's kind of tender inside and resembles a dried apple being edible only with ketchup", if I remember right.

SW?

Forwen
03-05-06, 01:43
SW?

Star Wars. Oh come on. Wedge Antilles is a hero of the Alliance!

RoseTyler
03-05-06, 02:00
Never seen Star Wars :ton: *shock! horror!* :p

CerebralAssassin
03-05-06, 02:14
Never seen Star Wars :ton: *shock! horror!* :p
I haven't either. :p

tha_mattster
03-05-06, 02:18
Australia IS its own continent. ;) The worlds largest island too.

So which continent is New Zealand and the various other islands in? I thought it was called Australasia or Oceana, but I checked and you are correct. its strange though.

DREWY
03-05-06, 03:02
then what about those tiny little islands in the pacific,where do they belong?:p

All of those countries are seperate entities. All together they form Oceania.
Australia is the only country that covers a whole continent. (Other than Antarctica but several countries have claim to parts of that)

tha_mattster
03-05-06, 03:45
All of those countries are seperate entities. All together they form Oceania.
Australia is the only country that covers a whole continent. (Other than Antarctica but several countries have claim to parts of that)

Dont you like new zealand? Your just jelous they got lord of the rings and you got crocadile dundee! :p :p

TombH4x
03-05-06, 05:28
Mind you, my idea of torture is having to listen to Eastenders (where everyone seems indifferenet to "th", instead they use "f") Such misuse of the english language should be punishable by having your nose hairs burned out one by one IMO). Quite 'orrible in me own opinion, like :p

Heh, I work with a bloke who speaks like this. Thought it was kinda funny when I first heard him say three(free). Not terribley hard to understand mind, but I'd never heard this accent prior to meeting this guy.

Seems that it's hard to understand anyone with a different accent until you've had time to hear it for a while. Eventually, I can easily understand just about anyone, even if they have a thick accent. That helped me when I was working a phone job that had a lot of Asian, Aussie and New Zeland clients.

DREWY
03-05-06, 05:54
Dont you like new zealand? Your just jelous they got lord of the rings and you got crocadile dundee! :p :p

Ah yes, New Zealand. The land where men are men and sheep are nervous. Where sex is a number and six is a naughty word. G'day Kiwis!
Sorry, I'm only being serious. :ton:

New Zealand is a seperate country to Australia, they have nothing to do with us except being our closest neighbour. They may have had LOTR, but if their country is soooo good, why do we have more of them over here in OZ than they do back home. If you ever want to see total extremes of nature though, tour NZ. Beautiful scenery if you like that sort of thing. The home of adventure sports too. Highly recomemended. (if you tell a Kiwi that I said something nice about the place, I'll hunt you down. Great rivalry between us)

gazhammer
03-05-06, 06:17
Apologies for calling you Americans... "Yanks", (theres a few too many of ya to argue with";)

As for English accents, i happen to be from the East End of London so if your not careful i'll poke yer "mince pies" out and throw you down the "apples and pears", thats if i can afford to get there in the first place, as i'm absolutely "barrasic lint"!.:D

Genocide
03-05-06, 08:37
I never misunderstand what Americans say, one of my best friends is a 'Yank' (her words, not mine...i guess it just makes it easier for her)
I myself have come from Yorkshire, and have a been told i have a really strong accent (even from fellow Yorkshiremen), which does make it difficult at times for some people.
but i have friends from all over so accents don't really bother me much

gazhammer
03-05-06, 08:58
I never misunderstand what Americans say, one of my best friends is a 'Yank' (her words, not mine...i guess it just makes it easier for her)
I myself have come from Yorkshire, and have a been told i have a really strong accent (even from fellow Yorkshiremen), which does make it difficult at times for some people.
but i have friends from all over so accents don't really bother me much

Ay up lad!, get the puddings on.:D

Genocide
03-05-06, 10:22
Ay up lad!, get the puddings on.:D
im trying to think of something to counter that, but nowt comes to mind...

Lonely Istari
04-05-06, 05:02
wow, this thread got grew a bit since i last read it. :p

Well, I love this thread, I really do. :jmp: Something fascinates me about the major differences in such similar cultures! How can we be so much alike, yet so different?! I love it! And I love the distinction. I'm a proud "Yank." (and yes, I'm from the North haha.) Not that I really care to be called one. I enjoy my country, but what would life be like without other cultures to explore!?

Back to the term "Yank"... (I'm talking US use of the word...) I hate how just because I'm from the North Eastern US means I'm a Yankee. I mean, sure, that's fine, but not when (as most southerners do) people use it in a condescending way. As if I was a carpetbagger who came and took over after the (Civil) war. It was over a Century ago... let's get over it... :rolleyes:

RedTyga
04-05-06, 14:04
Well that, and when people from other countires use Yank in a condensending way. Back to the South though, I really don't get that either and I also don't get why some states and, well, people, still fly the Confederate flag. I mean there's no good reason for it, at all, except to display your ignorance and arrogant racism, IMO.

Nephili
04-05-06, 14:44
Im from Cornwall in England, ive grew up watching alot of American shows, so i guess i understand accents fine, the Cornish accent is a horrible one to understand, ive lived here my whole life, but i dont have it thankfully :D

But they tend to add 'Me lover' at the end of nearly every sentence, and 'Mate' at the end of a sentence aswell, except they pronounce Mate, like Met, its really annoying lmao! We also have our own language in Cornwall, which i wasnt aware off till last year, i dont know it either, all i know is Cornwall is Kernow in the Cornish Language, Confusing lol!

Greenkey2
04-05-06, 15:41
I don't think I find particular accents difficult to understand (except in extrteme cases) but I can't abide really high-pitched whining voices that talk too fast :cln: There is a very well-known beauty presentor on QVC that sets my teeth a-jangling, and on BBC News24 is a female business reporter with the same thing. :eek:

And though the New York accent isn't too bad most of the time, Ricki Lake's voice makes me want to commit suicide http://www.clicksmilies.com/s0105/sprachlos/speechless-smiley-003.gif

gazhammer
04-05-06, 15:53
I don't think I find particular accents difficult to understand (except in extrteme cases) but I can't abide really high-pitched whining voices that talk too fast :cln: There is a very well-known beauty presentor on QVC that sets my teeth a-jangling, and on BBC News24 is a female business reporter with the same thing. :eek:

And though the New York accent isn't too bad most of the time, Ricki Lake's voice makes me want to commit suicide http://www.clicksmilies.com/s0105/sprachlos/speechless-smiley-003.gif

That blooming Nottinghamshire accent is hard to understand, its all Sherrif's and hooded blokes called Robin down there!.:D

Greenkey2
04-05-06, 15:59
That blooming Nottinghamshire accent is hard to understand, its all Sherrif's and hooded blokes called Robin down there!.:D

How dare you insult the Greenwood?! :yik: I'll get my friend Little John onto you! :vlol:

Actually it's strange - I' don't think my accent is really that bad. But everyone I went to school with says I speak far too posh ;)

gazhammer
04-05-06, 16:02
How dare you insult the Greenwood?! :yik: I'll get my friend Little John onto you! :vlol:

Actually it's strange - I' don't think my accent is really that bad. But everyone I went to school with says I speak far too posh ;)


Argghhh CRAP, a posh bird:yik:...... Run for the hills....:ton:

Greenkey2
04-05-06, 16:03
Argghhh CRAP, a posh bird:yik:...... Run for the hills....:ton:

So posh in fact I do voice-over work for Lara Croft :whi: :vlol: ARGH!! HELP!!!! :vlol: :vlol:

gazhammer
04-05-06, 16:06
So posh in fact I do voice-over work for Lara Croft :whi: :vlol: ARGH!! HELP!!!! :vlol: :vlol:

Reeeeaaallllllllyyyyyyy..... could you also double for Angelina Jolie?.:eek:..:D

Greenkey2
04-05-06, 16:09
*puts on posh voice* Oh really, gazhammer, that would not be appropriate for such idle chatter ;)

gazhammer
04-05-06, 16:21
*puts on posh voice* Oh really, gazhammer, that would not be appropriate for such idle chatter ;)

My cat Sylvester said to say hello.:D

Jonnipants
04-05-06, 17:46
Whenever an American says "What's up?" to start a conversation. I say "Nothing is the matter with me?" O.o

Yeah.

jackles
04-05-06, 18:14
I worked with a canadian teacher a few years back and when he was teaching our kids I had to sometimes stop and say..'no we don't spell it like that over here.' He would get quite annoyed and tell me that millions of people spelled stuff like that but I would have to explain that they didnt do that 'over here'



Now what i realy hate is cartoons.. when English people are either 'What ho' toffs or 'Gor blimey governor' commoners.....ummmmm no ....we are not like that at all!!!

RoseTyler
04-05-06, 18:16
Now what i realy hate is cartoons.. when English people are either 'What ho' toffs or 'Gor blimey governor' commoners.....ummmmm no ....we are not like that at all!!!

Yeah thats annoying! And they think we live on tea and scones :p

mmmmm tea...

jackles
04-05-06, 18:19
and wear cloth caps....and have stiff upper lips and all that....stiff upper lips...have they never noticed that we have a excitable looney element?? ;o))

jackles
04-05-06, 18:20
and dont even get me started on Dick Van dyke......'oh its a jolly holiday with Mary.....'

*does jolly cocker-knee dance* ;)

RedTyga
04-05-06, 18:31
I worked with a canadian teacher a few years back and when he was teaching our kids I had to sometimes stop and say..'no we don't spell it like that over here.' He would get quite annoyed and tell me that millions of people spelled stuff like that but I would have to explain that they didnt do that 'over here'



Now what i realy hate is cartoons.. when English people are either 'What ho' toffs or 'Gor blimey governor' commoners.....ummmmm no ....we are not like that at all!!!

Family Guy makes fun of English people a lot. Last last night they did in fact. There was some English fellow who had a food shop in America and was trying to sell something, forgot what it was, but obviously it was nasty, and the American he was trying to sell it too was annoyed and told him no repeatedly before walking away. The Englishman sighed, walked out of his shop and you can see he was wearing 19th or early 20th century clothes. He asked himself when he was going to assimilate, jumped into his first model English car and took off on the left side of the road, causing other cars that were driving directly at him to swerve out of the way and crash into each other.

It was actually quite funny, they really push that English stereotype to the extreme.

T.Onix
04-05-06, 19:43
A good friend of mine from Australia was in the US, and thought he might need sandals, but they call them thongs. He went to a mall and this guy, very well dressed and very kind came near him and asked him if we could help him, so my friend goes "Yeah, I'd like to buy a pair of thongs".
You can imagine my friend's face saying "What the heck are you doing???" when the other guy started to show him underwear.