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B_Raider
28-05-06, 18:11
I was browsing around the Encyclopedia of Britannica Online and found some information on Avalon that i thought i might share with you guys at the forum. ;)

Avalon

island to which Britain's legendary king Arthur was conveyed for the healing of his wounds after his final battle. It is first mentioned in Geoffery of monmouth's Historia regum Britanniae (c. 1136), while the same author's Vita Merlini (c. 1150) described it as “the island of apples [‘Insula pomorum'], called fortunate.” It was ruled by the enchantress Morgan le Fay and her eight sisters, all of them skilled in the healing arts.
Geoffrey may have been attempting to connect his “island of apples” with Celtic mythology's traditions of an elysium; and the name Avalon is certainly close to the Welsh word for apple, afal. Sir John Rhys, however (Studies in the Arthurian Legend, 1891), preferred to link the name Avalon with that of Aballach, a (hypothetical) dark Celtic divinity. Avalon has been identified with Glastonbury in Somerset, and this may be connected with Celtic legends about an “isle of glass” inhabited by deceased heroes. It is equally likely to have been an attempt by the monks of Glastonbury to exploit the Arthurian legend for the benefit of their own community.


Morgan le Fay

fairy enchantress of Arthurian legend and romance.

Geoffrey of Monmouth's Vita Merlini (c. 1150) named her as the ruler of Avalon, a marvelous island where King Arthur was to be healed of his wounds, and it described her as skilled in the arts of healing and of changing shape. In Chrétien de Troyes's romance of Erec (c. 1165), she first appeared as King Arthur's sister. In 12th- and 13th-century elaborations of Arthurian legend, two themes, of healing and of hostility (owing to unrequited love), were developed: in the early 13th-century Vulgate cycle, for example, she was responsible for stirring up trouble between Arthur and his queen, Guinevere, yet finally appeared as a beneficent figure conveying Arthur to Avalon. Her magic powers were explained as learned from books and from the enchanter Merlin. Although later versions of the legend placed Arthur's death in a Christian context, traditions of a living Arthur being tended by Morgan le Fay (until the time should come for him to return to his kingdom) survived in some 13th- and 14th-century texts, many of them associated with Sicily—perhaps taken there by Norman conquerors—where the term Fatah Morgan is still used to designate a mirage sometimes seen in the Strait of Messina.



Source - Encyclopedia of Britannica Online Academic Edition.

badboy70
28-05-06, 18:44
i'm gonna read a book about avalon :D

ben croft
28-05-06, 23:06
I need more info on Avalon too. :D

PirateRose
29-05-06, 06:02
apple hrmmm?

Perhaps there is a connection with adam and eve? although the bible does not say what the fruit is they eat, it is commonly assiciated with an apple.