PDA

View Full Version : The Ultimate Hammer Horror Collection (UK DVD)


TombRaiderLover
25-09-06, 17:54
http://www.dvdtimes.co.uk/content.php?contentid=62885

Optimum Home Entertainment have announced the UK Region 2 DVD release of The Ultimate Hammer Collection for 23rd October 2006 priced at £149.99. From the vaults of the legendary Hammer production house come these 21 classic films, the cream of Hammer’s Horror, Science Fiction and Fantasy productions, featuring iconic performances from Vincent Price, Peter Cushing and Christopher Lee among a host of others. This box-set also includes “The Nanny”, a Hammer classic never before seen on UK DVD starring the legendary Bette Davies.

The Films:


She

The Nanny

Dracula Prince of Darkness

The Plague of the Zombies

Rasputin the Mad Monk

The Reptile

The Witches

One Million Years B.C.

The Viking Queen

Frankenstein Created Woman

Quatermass and the Pit

The Vengeance of She

The Devil Rides Out

Prehistoric Women

Scars of Dracula

The Horror Frankenstein

Blood from the Mummy’s Tomb

Straight on Till Morning

Fear in the Night

Demons of the Mind

To The Devil A Daughter

The Extras: Included in the set are audio commentaries, trailers, interviews and the full-length documentary “To the Devil…the Death of Hammer”.

The box-set includes six audio commentaries, which include contributions from the following:

Roy Ward Baker – The veteran director made seven films for Hammer between 1967 and 1973, as well as an episode of the company’s television series Journey to the Unknown. He appears on the commentary for Scars of Dracula.

Christopher Lee – Although they were never a double act, Peter Cushing and Christopher Lee are indelibly linked to the studio that made them international stars. Lee appears on the commentary for Scars of Dracula.

Jimmy Sangster – Writer, producer and director, Jimmy Sangster was one of the original architects of Hammer horror. He wrote The Curse of Frankenstein in 1957 and saw 15 subsequent scripts filmed by the company. He appears on the commentaries for The Nanny, The Horror of Frankenstein and Fear in the Night.

Peter Sykes – Peter Sykes’ relatively brief directing career included two Hammer films, both of which are featured in this box set. He appears on the commentary for Demons of the Mind and in the documentary that accompanies To The Devil A Daughter.

http://ec1.images-amazon.com/images/P/B000HN31KQ.01.PT01._SS400_SCLZZZZZZZ_V39946273_.jp g

VonCroy360
25-09-06, 19:03
:cln: 21 DVD-s. And I never watched most of those movies.
Is it for the whole region 2 or the UK only?

:)

Paperdoll
25-09-06, 19:05
I'd love to have that O_O'

BtoFu
25-09-06, 19:27
Most of these suck..unless you like cheese of course.

Paul H
25-09-06, 19:39
Some good movies there, although I'm surprised they left out Dr Jekyll and Sister Hyde and Twins of Evil. They are both great Hammer classics.

Neteru
25-09-06, 20:04
Most of these suck..unless you like cheese of course.Maybe they do to you with today's kinds of films. But to me, when I was a kid and these aired on TV, Hammer Horror were great.

DREWY
25-09-06, 23:48
The Devil Rides Out? Is that based on Dennis Wheatley's book? That was an awesome read. Love to see that.
Yes special effects have moved on since, but these relied on atmosphere to be scary - not a computer.

wantafanta
26-09-06, 02:08
http://home.att.net/~dalibrul/dracula.jpg


Christopher Lee was the scariest Dracula ever. I saw him do Saturday Night Live once!

DREWY
26-09-06, 02:12
He had the eyes. Especially in black and white films.

Mr.Burns
26-09-06, 02:13
Most of these suck..unless you like cheese of course.

Cheesy by today's standards. If you look at the original horror films of the 1920's, you'd probably think that, "these are not scary at all, how could they think that was the case?" At that time, there was no such thing as freddy kruger, jason, chucky and all the other famous characters of the slasher flic genre. Movies at that time were what most people today would call psychological thrillers. Over the years, that aspect of horror films was starting to get dull so the concept of violence was introduced albeit rather slowly. The Hammer collection has always been accepted in the film community as a milestone in the horror genre. Hammer studios put out a vast number of horror movies including the remake and subsequent sequels of Christopher Lee's Dracula. After awhile, horror films started to stagnate and then came a little indie flick called the Texas Chainsaw Massacre. This was the first of the slasher flicks and thus paved the way to the new era of horror movies which used cheap scare tactics and increasing amounts of blood and gore. Yet again we are seeing the horror genre stagnate and perhaps you have noticed that horror movies are relying less on blood and gore and more on psychological terror. The Hammer films are from a different era, a different kind of horror. But to horror fans, they're classics that defined a decade of film making.

::sighs:: I know that seemed too much like horror propaganda but the horror genre is one of my most favorite film genres and I studied it extensively during film school. This actually is my view on horror films.

Mr.Burns
26-09-06, 02:15
http://home.att.net/%7Edalibrul/dracula.jpg


Christopher Lee was the scariest Dracula ever. I saw him do Saturday Night Live once!


Well, personally I find Max Shrek to be the scariest, though most people probably don't know who he was. But yea, Chris Lee definitely redefined the Dracula form. For the record, the Dracula movies are my favorite horror films.

wantafanta
26-09-06, 02:15
whoops - my mistake - sorry!

TombRaiderLover
26-09-06, 06:06
Well, personally I find Max Shrek to be the scariest, though most people probably don't know who he was. But yea, Chris Lee definitely redefined the Dracula form. For the record, the Dracula movies are my favorite horror films.
Yeah, Max Schreck was brilliant as Count Orlock (Nosferatu)

VonCroy - Sorry, not sure.

jackles
26-09-06, 07:07
For one glorious moment I read that price as 14.99.....and then realised the futility of that thought!

Back in the *cough* 70's they used to have a Hammer horror on every Friday night and me and my mate used to sit up watching them alone at night while her parents went out! Used to be great fun!

Bit of a hit and miss selction I think as I'm sure there were others that could have been added as well! But still gooooooooooooooooooooood!

BtoFu
26-09-06, 15:38
Cheesy by today's standards. If you look at the original horror films of the 1920's, you'd probably think that, "these are not scary at all, how could they think that was the case?" At that time, there was no such thing as freddy kruger, jason, chucky and all the other famous characters of the slasher flic genre. Movies at that time were what most people today would call psychological thrillers. Over the years, that aspect of horror films was starting to get dull so the concept of violence was introduced albeit rather slowly. The Hammer collection has always been accepted in the film community as a milestone in the horror genre. Hammer studios put out a vast number of horror movies including the remake and subsequent sequels of Christopher Lee's Dracula. After awhile, horror films started to stagnate and then came a little indie flick called the Texas Chainsaw Massacre. This was the first of the slasher flicks and thus paved the way to the new era of horror movies which used cheap scare tactics and increasing amounts of blood and gore. Yet again we are seeing the horror genre stagnate and perhaps you have noticed that horror movies are relying less on blood and gore and more on psychological terror. The Hammer films are from a different era, a different kind of horror. But to horror fans, they're classics that defined a decade of film making.

::sighs:: I know that seemed too much like horror propaganda but the horror genre is one of my most favorite film genres and I studied it extensively during film school. This actually is my view on horror films.

You're talking to me like like I'm ill-informed of how crap most of them are...The Satanic Rites of Dracula was my first horror flick at the age of 5 - he gets caught in a bloody bush and this was to be his undoing. Fair enough Hammer was a studio with a vision and a lick of integrity, but it doesn't excuse the fact that the vast majority of them don't hold up well now and frankly didn't even hold up back in the 80's when I was a little nipper watching the HammerShaw Legend of the Seven Golden Vampires and other studio efforts of the same ilk. I hope you're not insinuating that I'm not a horror fan just because I don't appreciate one singular vein in the body of work that it encompasses.

Mr.Burns
27-09-06, 01:25
You're talking to me like like I'm ill-informed of how crap most of them are...The Satanic Rites of Dracula was my first horror flick at the age of 5 - he gets caught in a bloody bush and this was to be his undoing. Fair enough Hammer was a studio with a vision and a lick of integrity, but it doesn't excuse the fact that the vast majority of them don't hold up well now and frankly didn't even hold up back in the 80's when I was a little nipper watching the HammerShaw Legend of the Seven Golden Vampires and other studio efforts of the same ilk. I hope you're not insinuating that I'm not a horror fan just because I don't appreciate one singular vein in the body of work that it encompasses.
Oh not at all, I wouldn't insult you and that was not my intention. For that, my apologies if I did insult you. You're comment just got me thinking about the progression of the genre over the years and how it has changed. I was just posting my thoughts on that progression and was not attempting to bash your love of horror films. As for the films, well, yes there were quite a few of those films that weren't good. But even bad films do end up getting noted in film history. Some of them I couldn't help but laugh at and I'm sure that people that saw them during their original release probably did as well. Those films are still highlighted simply because of the fame that Hammer recieved, otherwise they'd fade away into obscurity.