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Andromeda66
01-10-06, 17:34
Some people love life too much to ever let go. Australian biologist Philip Rhoades is one of them.

In six months time, Rhoades hopes to build Australia's first cryonics centre to deep freeze his parents after they die, in the hope that future advances in nanotechnology will bring them back to life.

The bodies will be drained of blood, filled with preservative chemicals, dippedi nto liquid nitrogen and entomed upside down in cylinders. decades later medicine may advance to the point where such bodies can be revived.Rhoades' mother Dorothy, 74, a science teacher, and father Gerald 79, an industrial chemist, will be the first to be frozen at the centre in Cowra, 200 km from Sydney, after they die. Later, Rhoades himself and one of his sisters, Jocelyn, will undergo the process. But Rhoades' girlfriend, although accepting his views, did not want to be suspended after her death.

"So far she has not shown interest which is sad because I'd really miss her in future", says Rhoades.
Cryonics is the preservation of legally dead human beings or pets at very low temperatures (below -196deg Centigrade) in the hope that future advances in sciences can bring them back to life, youth and health. Rhoades started researching this a decade back, and was surprised to find it was still in its infancy. He signed up with the Cryonics Institute in Michigan and began working with the Cryonics Asoociation of Australia(CAA).


"There was a growing realisation that we needed a cryonics centre in Australia. There are practical problems if an Australian wants to be suspended in US. Ifyou know you are dying, you can fly to the US. But if you die suddenly, you will first be treated in Australia before being sent to the US cryonics centres. Then you are not too sure about the quality of the suspension", says Rhoades, who wants resources to be available in Australia by the time cryonics becomes big.

"With quantum computing and sophistical nanotechnology, I am optimistic that in the next 20 to 50 years, we would be able to live forever unless a nuclearwar or global calamity strikes. My whole basis is that if you have a choice to prolong life, why cut it short?" asks Rhoades, who is often told by his girlfriend that the future may not be worth living in, with the way the world is going.

However, the scientist feels mankind is at a cusp in history, where science and medicine are growing at an exponential rate. "We are not quite at a stage where medicine and science can keep us healthy forever, but there is a greater than zero chance of revival, if frozen", he explains.

Between life and death...

1. When a person registered with a cryonics institute dies, ice is applied to the body, followed by injection of an anticoagulant(heparin etc)
2. the body is transported to a funeral home. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation is given to keep oxygenated blood circulating. The patient's blood is removed with washout solution and a mixture of anti-freeze substances.
3. The body is filled with cryo-protectant mixture. Cooling to -130deg Centigrade takes place under computer control until 'vitrification' (solidification without freezing).
4. Following vitrification, patients are places upside down in individual aluminium containers, which are finally immersed in liquid nitrigen at a temperature of -196deg Centigrade and kept in a cryostat for long-term care

More information at www.cryonics.org (http://www.cryonics.org)
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Personal view:
What is it with the 'happily ever after' rut?
but there is a greater than zero chance of revival, if frozen.
Only just.


What do you guys think?

MiCkiZ88
01-10-06, 17:44
whart do I think of this..

Just plain crazy.. :eek:
We've been having some lessons at school about this and we've come to a conclusion that is has to be a really fast prosedure cause the ice breaks the cells.. that means both freezing and melting procedure.. so.. there's a pretty huge change of not coming back to live.. hence the person is already dead.. it's just the corpse..

Andromeda66
01-10-06, 17:55
whart do I think of this..

Just plain crazy.. :eek:
We've been having some lessons at school about this and we've come to a conclusion that is has to be a really fast prosedure cause the ice breaks the cells.. that means both freezing and melting procedure.. so.. there's a pretty huge change of not coming back to live.. hence the person is already dead.. it's just the corpse..

Even if they DO succeed in getting the body's system functioning, I dont think it'll work. There's more to the body than just biofluid regulation, in my opinion.

da tomb raider!
01-10-06, 18:34
Sometimes, I wish that people could just live their life, and stop worrying so much about death. It's part of life. Well, sorta...

Shark_Blade
01-10-06, 18:54
Yeah. No body lives forever you know. Enjoy it while you can.:)