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View Full Version : There are 10 directions (Caution: Extreme Boredom May Ensue!)


wantafanta
17-01-07, 20:57
There is True North. The earth revolves around an axis which passes through True North and True South, like a top spinning on its south pole. Then there is Magnetic North. Your compass does not point to the North you will see on most maps. It points to a location about 1000 miles from the North Pole. The Magnetic North pole lies somewhere in Canada and moves a little bit each year. It is where the earth's magnetism converges.
To find True North from your compass you will need to either add or subtract several degrees. This is called declension or variation. The amount of degrees depends on where you are with your compass. If your compass points west of true north, you will need to add a few degrees to know where true north is. If the compass is pointing east of true north, you will need to subtract a few degrees. East is least and West is best is how you remember. (Least=subtract).
So, we have 10 directions: True North, South, East, West and Magnetic North, South, East, West plus up and down.

Ampersand
17-01-07, 21:03
Well that's interesting to know. :D

Ikas90
18-01-07, 00:38
Why does up and down count, but left and right don't? Left and right can point anywhere, you know :D

Mr.Burns
18-01-07, 00:42
Ah thank you so much. I've been arguing with my coworkers for two years now about that. We have to use a compass to determine where the satellites are pointing and the compasses point magnetic north. Where'd you find this?

laralives
18-01-07, 01:11
I'd rather stick to well known roads :pi:

wantafanta
18-01-07, 01:56
Ah thank you so much. I've been arguing with my coworkers for two years now about that. We have to use a compass to determine where the satellites are pointing and the compasses point magnetic north. Where'd you find this?

I fly flight simulators for a hobby and before I learned how to plan real flights, I would look at maps and plot a straight line to fly. Trouble was, some charts had 2 arrows. One for True north, the other for Magnetic north. It got very confusing until I read up on it. Airplane charts and instruments all use Magnetic headings, so pilots don't have to worry about converting from magnetic to true heading.

Draco
18-01-07, 06:53
I've known this since I had my first globe.