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View Full Version : OT - T-Rex Really a Chicken


Nora Charles
13-04-07, 04:20
Well sort of off- topic - I mean there is a T-Rex in TRA isn't there?:p

link (http://www.news.com.au/story/0,23599,21549465-1702,00.html)
US researchers who studied tiny bits of soft tissue from a 68 million-year-old T-rex fossil say its molecular structure is very close to that of the modern chicken.

xBoricua
13-04-07, 04:25
I'm thinking this should be in the General Chat section. Interesting though.

Edit: by the way welcome to the forums

Tyrannosaurus
13-04-07, 04:51
I hope it comes as no surprise to anyone here, unless, of course, you deny evolution. Bob Bakker studied several chicken bones years ago and concluded that Tyrannosaurus legs were virtually identical, just scaled up. Hell, Sir Richard Owen, who coined the term "dinosaur" (and he didn't even believe in evolution) was one of the first people to note the anatomical similarities between birds and dinosaurs.

Well, I may be a close to a chicken, but I'm not chicken, if you catch my drift. :D

YvesSL
13-04-07, 04:59
No, it's chicken = a t-rex

Shark_Blade
13-04-07, 05:17
lol does t-rex taste like chicken?

Ward Dragon
13-04-07, 05:32
I hope it comes as no surprise to anyone here, unless, of course, you deny evolution. Bob Bakker studied several chicken bones years ago and concluded that Tyrannosaurus legs were virtually identical, just scaled up. Hell, Sir Richard Owen, who coined the term "dinosaur" (and he didn't even believe in evolution) was one of the first people to note the anatomical similarities between birds and dinosaurs.

Well, I may be a close to a chicken, but I'm not chicken, if you catch my drift. :D

Indeed :) I like Bakker. He wrote Raptor Red and advised the makers of the Jurassic Park movie about how to make the dinosaurs (he even gets a mention in the movie where Timmy says that one of Bakker's books was much longer than Dr. Grant's book :p)

RichieRobson
13-04-07, 05:37
lol does t-rex taste like chicken?

no more like turkey

Shark_Blade
13-04-07, 05:51
no more like turkey
You ate a giant lizard before?:yik: yuck! :p

RichieRobson
13-04-07, 05:52
look i was hungy ok? :ton:

Shark_Blade
13-04-07, 05:59
ok. :whi: I won't tell anyone. I 'square'.

Kiss-Bite
13-04-07, 06:06
I also watched a Dino documentary on the UK History channel a few weeks ago which had an interesting fact, the T-rex & other similar dino types also had wishbones, a bone that is found in modern birds. :D

PirateFromPeru
13-04-07, 06:15
T-Rex is a chicken huh? If you cut his head off, does he run around in a headless panic for fifteen minutes? :vlol:

It's kinda the same thing with velociraptors. Their bones are very bird-like. Raptor also means 'bird of prey.' Since raptors hunt in packs, I guess present day raptors are Harris' hawks in Texas and Central America. The only bird of prey that hunts in packs (at least to my knowledge.)

Ward Dragon
13-04-07, 06:38
T-Rex is a chicken huh? If you cut his head off, does he run around in a headless panic for fifteen minutes? :vlol:

It's kinda the same thing with velociraptors. Their bones are very bird-like. Raptor also means 'bird of prey.' Since raptors hunt in packs, I guess present day raptors are Harris' hawks in Texas and Central America. The only bird of prey that hunts in packs (at least to my knowledge.)

Have you read Jurassic Park? Somewhere in the novel, a velociraptor's head gets blown off and it's still running around and slashing the air. That came into my mind when I read your post :)

Mad Tony
13-04-07, 06:42
Shouldn't this be in general chat? As it has nothing to do with Anniversary?

LaraMan2
13-04-07, 07:05
I hope it comes as no surprise to anyone here, unless, of course, you deny evolution. Bob Bakker studied several chicken bones years ago and concluded that Tyrannosaurus legs were virtually identical, just scaled up. Hell, Sir Richard Owen, who coined the term "dinosaur" (and he didn't even believe in evolution) was one of the first people to note the anatomical similarities between birds and dinosaurs.

Well, I may be a close to a chicken, but I'm not chicken, if you catch my drift. :D

...

PirateFromPeru
13-04-07, 07:17
Shouldn't this be in general chat? As it has nothing to do with Anniversary?
Probably was brought up due to the fact a t-rex is in TRA. But yeah, a mod could move this or even close.

Tomb Raider Master
13-04-07, 09:34
Thread moved to General Chat section.

scion05
13-04-07, 11:02
Shouldn't this be in general chat? As it has nothing to do with Anniversary?

Errrr, isn't you signature a bit... rude...

Lara Croft!
13-04-07, 17:01
I have heard before that birds are the only descendants of dinosours,so this doesn't surprise me!

Shark_Blade
13-04-07, 17:19
Isn't crocodiles the only decendent of the dinosaurs left?

Greenkey2
13-04-07, 17:43
I adore paleaontology - have done since I was a little kid :D This news is not amazingly unexpected, but really cool all the same :tmb: The idea that biological material of any kind (not counting coal and amber :p) can survive so long and still be recovered intact is pretty damned incredible :eek:


Indeed :) I like Bakker. He wrote Raptor Red and advised the makers of the Jurassic Park movie about how to make the dinosaurs (he even gets a mention in the movie where Timmy says that one of Bakker's books was much longer than Dr. Grant's book :p)

Bakker rules! :tmb: I have the sneaking suspicion that he also had a pretend cameo in Jurassic Park's sequel, the Lost World. That man who jumps out of the jeep to watch a pachycephalosaurus (think that's the right name/spelling) slam into a vehicle during the stampede scene strikes an uncanny resemblence, don't you think? ;) The hat, glasses and beard are spot on.

Lara Croft!
13-04-07, 17:48
Isn't crocodiles the only decendent of the dinosaurs left?

I don't know,I just told what I have heard!:D

Greenkey2
13-04-07, 17:56
Dinosaurs and reptiles (including crocodiles) split many millions of years ago :wve: I did a short course as an introduction to the subject only last year - but I lent the book to a friend and I can't remember exactly when the split happened! :p

Suffice it to say that the view most paleaontologists adhere to now is that dinosaurs were a completely separate order from what we know today as birds, reptiles and amphibians.

Tyrannosaurus
14-04-07, 02:17
Isn't crocodiles the only decendent of the dinosaurs left?At best they are our cousins, not decendents.

Tyrannosaurus
14-04-07, 02:24
Indeed :) I like Bakker. He wrote Raptor Red and advised the makers of the Jurassic Park movie about how to make the dinosaurs (he even gets a mention in the movie where Timmy says that one of Bakker's books was much longer than Dr. Grant's book :p) Bakker's definitely the man, but when Grant shuts the door as soon as Tim mentions Bakker--well, that pretty much summarizes the movie's attitude toward him. That and the fact that an obvious Bakker caricature is eaten by a Tyrannosaurus in the Lost World. Grant, you see, is based on John Horner, whose ideas polluted JP3 (the man doesn't even have a PhD), and I'm damn bitter about it. He's the one advocating the nonsensical theories that I was a complete scavenger, or that I would lose in a fight against a Spinosaurus, which is nonsense. Someone needs to have a Horner caricature espousing Horner's views on Tyrannosaur behavior and then end up as food for one in the fourth movie.

I wish people would realise that there's a heck of a lot more to know about dinosaurs than what's in Jurassic Park. The paleontology of that movie (and espescially Crichton's book) is pretty outdated now. Bakker's Raptor Red, IMHO, was the most realistic dinosaur novel ever written. I loved the fact that it engages the animals from their point of view. Introduce humans into the issue, and you complicate matters by having to tell a human story. Who the hell wants one?

Izzie404
14-04-07, 03:35
I think humans are related closely to Bananas and Fruit Fly's, so this doesn't come as much surprise...

PirateFromPeru
14-04-07, 05:25
Some dinosaurs had skeletons that were bird-like while others were more lizard-hipped. I liked dinosaurs when I was a kid so this gives me a chance to share some knowledge. I think it's a good chance that most dinosaurs evolved into birds. Take the duck-billed dinosaurs such as Parasaurolophis and Corythasauris (I think that's how you spell them). Try telling me that they aren't the ancestors of today's ducks and geese. Wood ducks have a long crest on their head, so it may be possible that something like Parasaurolophis (since it had a long crest too) could have possibly evolved into something like the wood duck. :confused: ;) :)

Ward Dragon
14-04-07, 06:45
Bakker's definitely the man, but when Grant shuts the door as soon as Tim mentions Bakker--well, that pretty much summarizes the movie's attitude toward him. That and the fact that an obvious Bakker caricature is eaten by a Tyrannosaurus in the Lost World. Grant, you see, is based on John Horner, whose ideas polluted JP3 (the man doesn't even have a PhD), and I'm damn bitter about it. He's the one advocating the nonsensical theories that I was a complete scavenger, or that I would lose in a fight against a Spinosaurus, which is nonsense. Someone needs to have a Horner caricature espousing Horner's views on Tyrannosaur behavior and then end up as food for one in the fourth movie.

I wish people would realise that there's a heck of a lot more to know about dinosaurs than what's in Jurassic Park. The paleontology of that movie (and espescially Crichton's book) is pretty outdated now. Bakker's Raptor Red, IMHO, was the most realistic dinosaur novel ever written. I loved the fact that it engages the animals from their point of view. Introduce humans into the issue, and you complicate matters by having to tell a human story. Who the hell wants one?

I see. I wasn't aware of John Horner, but I was totally put off by the Spinosaurus in JP3. I cried when the T-rex died :( T-rex would have totally won that battle in real life :D I was also very annoyed at JP3 because at the beginning they set the movie up for the raptors to do really cool stuff, but they never followed through with it because they focused almost exclusively on the Spinosaurus :( I was also disappointed that Lost World didn't have the Carnotaurs in it because I remember them doing some really cool camouflaging things in the book and I would have loved to see that in the movie.

Tyrannosaurus
14-04-07, 18:13
Some dinosaurs had skeletons that were bird-like while others were more lizard-hipped. I'm afraid you're a little confused about dinosaur classifcation. Dinosaurs are divided into two orders: Ornithischia ("bird-hipped") and Saurischia ("lizard-hipped"). However, here's the duzy: The dinosaurs which gave rize to birds (Theropoda) are Saurischians. The name meaning doesn't actually have anything to do with relation.

I liked dinosaurs when I was a kid so this gives me a chance to share some knowledge. I think it's a good chance that most dinosaurs evolved into birds. Take the duck-billed dinosaurs such as Parasaurolophis and Corythasauris (I think that's how you spell them). Try telling me that they aren't the ancestors of today's ducks and geese. Wood ducks have a long crest on their head, so it may be possible that something like Parasaurolophis (since it had a long crest too) could have possibly evolved into something like the wood duck. :confused: ;) :) No paleontologist believes that duck-billed dinosaurs (Hadrosaurs) were related to birds. The similarites are superfical and not deep, like the dolphin and the shark, but not even.

And besides, evolution is neither linear, orderly, or about progression. That birds evolved from dinosaurs is a given, but that isn't an explaination for where they went. It's like the fool who asks, "If people evolved from monkeys and apes, then how come we still have monkeys and apes?" The answer: Because there still are ecological niches for them. We can ask with equal relevance why we still have bacteria, sponges, fish, lizards, dogs, and scorpions.