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View Full Version : Jail for retailers who sell adult video games


Doctorb
30-07-12, 17:29
Story HERE (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-19042908).


Although I doubt it would stop underage kids playing adult titles, but will it effect age restricted games being indirectly targeted at kids? Will this effect the new TR's marketing campaign?

Cochrane
30-07-12, 17:50
Many countries all over the world already have similar laws on the books. Generally speaking, as long as these laws don't require censorship, they don't seem to have a very negative effect on game sales.

That being said, of the underage kids that play mature games, very few have actually bought them legally, so I don't think it will actually stop any kids.

jackles
30-07-12, 17:52
Just been watching that on the news...don't parents purchase the games for kids anyway? Kind of defeats that issue.

Dennis's Mom
30-07-12, 18:32
I agree the majority of mature games that wind up in the hands of underaged kids were purchased by adults.

However, laws like this one make legislators feel like they've "done something" to solve a problem, however non-existent the problem is.

voltz
30-07-12, 18:47
And due to all this "political correctiveness", folks who really haven't done anything wrong will end up with a criminal mark on their records.

Tyrannosaurus
30-07-12, 19:51
I guess we can give up on having a quality AO rated game.

strawberry22
30-07-12, 21:20
Just been watching that on the news...don't parents purchase the games for kids anyway? Kind of defeats that issue.

This :\

TR FAN 18
30-07-12, 21:48
This will not make any difference whatsoever! There will be still be parents buying 18-rated games likes Call of Duty and GTA for their kids.

innocentvenus
30-07-12, 22:16
Love it when the parents don't use the rating system they whined for on games and then complain when their child plays said game they bought that's rated M.

Here's an idea politicians:

Instead of jailing the people selling these games to adults, jail the parents who buy the games for their kids!!!!!!

Oh wait. That's potential loss of votes right there. Let's appease the voters who don't raise their kids and expect society to do it for them.

moodydog
30-07-12, 22:22
No mention of a prison sentence in the article. The most likely thing for the retailers is that they will get fined if found out.
It doesn't change anything though; kids can still get access to these games.

voltz
31-07-12, 08:34
Instead of jailing the people selling these games to adults, jail the parents who buy the games for their kids!!!!!!

http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b279/Flyingmonkeyofdoom/Junk/bbslap.gif

Doctorb
31-07-12, 17:19
No mention of a prison sentence in the article. The most likely thing for the retailers is that they will get fined if found out.
It doesn't change anything though; kids can still get access to these games.

From the Guardian:

Under the regulations, retailers could face a prison sentence of up to six months and a fine of up to 5,000 for selling a game to someone under the age-rating classification.

Sorry, I posted the BBC link because it was easier to read.

Of course, once a few people start getting prosecuted the finger may start to point at parents and games designers.

DragonSlayer
31-07-12, 17:23
The retailers shouldn't be jailed it's the parents who should be jailed for buying the game in the first place, if a parent were to abandon their child for a few days with nothing but a plate of fish to eat social workers would take the child into protective custody, but a parent buying little Johnny an 18 rated game becomes a case of move along nothing to see here.

Gregori
31-07-12, 17:44
I played and watched all types of violent material when i was very young and I didn't become a psychopathic monster. They might aswell ban the news media as its full of real footage and pictures of actual violence.

ozzman
31-07-12, 18:29
guess just about all the guys working at the gamestop where i live should be in jail , they've all been selling me M games since i was 15 XD

Phlip
31-07-12, 19:14
I played and watched all types of violent material when i was very young and I didn't become a psychopathic monster.
Some kids get engrossed in it and believe it. Everyone's different.
They might aswell ban the news media as its full of real footage and pictures of actual violence.
Though this is true.


In the case of getting rid of the BBFC ratings, I support that. I didn't get the point in having two systems.

Gregori
31-07-12, 20:00
i think those kids that believe it were messed up to begin with :pi:

Lara My Love
02-08-12, 03:42
well then all of the stores in my town should be in jail xD
im 13, watching horror movies, playing horror games, and as normal; tomb raider series. in all the years i have been watching or playing, i havent got a single nightmare. but i think its right that people shouldnt sell violent/m+ games to younger kids, its just not right. even tough i buy m+ games/movies.

Ward Dragon
02-08-12, 04:20
i think those kids that believe it were messed up to begin with :pi:

I pretty much agree. I don't think videogames are capable of completely changing how a person thinks. People see what they want to see, and if somebody was willing to do something drastic then they'd find a trigger regardless of whether it was a videogame, movie, news story, celebrity, etc.

In any case regarding the age ratings, I don't agree with jail time for selling a videogame. I think a fine is better if the store did sell the game to an underage child. It adds enough financial risk to hopefully make it not profitable to sell mature games to children, but the clerk doesn't end up in jail if he's had a busy day and forgets to ask for ID if the kid looks old enough.

I don't think children should be allowed to buy mature games on their own without their parents' knowledge. On the other hand, responsible parents know what their children's personalities are like and whether the child is mature enough to handle a mature-rated game. I'm not opposed to children in general playing older games if their parents think it's alright and are keeping track of what their children are playing. But unfortunately irresponsible parents don't give a crap and the law isn't going to change that, so I don't think this new law will make much difference regarding children playing games.

The main difference is probably that game developers/publishers only have to worry about one ratings system now, so that's probably better for them (clearer guidelines to estimate what their game will be rated, probably fewer fees if they don't have to get it rated by an extra system, less confusion in the advertising because they have one less rating to worry about in trailers/websites/etc.)

moodydog
02-08-12, 07:48
The next thing they are going to do is go round to peoples houses to do surprise inspections, to see what games kids are playing. :whi:

Phlip
02-08-12, 13:16
i think those kids that believe it were messed up to begin with :pi:

I pretty much agree. I don't think videogames are capable of completely changing how a person thinks. People see what they want to see, and if somebody was willing to do something drastic then they'd find a trigger regardless of whether it was a videogame, movie, news story, celebrity, etc.

I think if the kid's young enough and they spend a decent amount playing a violent game, it could easily become somewhat the norm to them, and so repeating such actions is feasible.